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Home Nuclear Battery - power for 70 years - 12/18/15
written for KeelyNet by Jerry W. Decker Ⓒ

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KeelyNetI recently came across a patent with the most remarkable claim. It is GB 763062A - A new apparatus for producing electric current - December 5th, 1956 - describing a low weight, compact nuclear battery which produces 10 amps at 100-110 volts for up to 70 years and requires appropriate shielding.

This device produces 1000 watts and an average home requires between 5-10,000 watts so this device could be scaled up for home power. As well for electric cars which require some 30kw to 100kw to drive the electric motor.

How Many KW of Power Needed For an EV? - According to Electro Automotive: A small car (2500lbs. factory curb weight) uses an AC motor that pulls 43KW peak, 14KW continuous from your electric car's batteries at 156 volts. A large car (3500lbs. factory curb weight) uses a larger AC motor which pulls 78KW peak, 34KW continuous at 312 volts.

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According to the present invention we provide apparatus comprising a generator unit which includes a magnet, a means for suspending a chemical mixture in the magnetic field, the mixture being composed of elements whose nuclei becomes unstable as a result of bombardment by short waves so that the elements become radioactive and release electrical energy, the mixture being mounted between, and in contact with a pair of different metals such as copper and zinc, a capacitor mounted between those metals, a terminal electrically connected to each of the metals, means for conveying the waves to the mixture and a lead shield surrounding the mixture to prevent harmful radiation from the mixture.

The mixture is preferably composed of the elements Cadmium, Phosphorous and Cobalt having atomic weights of 112, 31 and 59 respectively. The mixture, which may be of powdered form, is mounted in a tube of non-conducting, high heat resistivity material and is compressed between granulated zinc at one end of the tube and granulated copper at the other end, the ends of the tube being closed by brass caps and the tube being carried in a suitable cradle so that it is located between the poles of the magnet. The magnet is preferably an electr-magnet and is energized by the current produced the by the unit.

In operation with the quartz tube containing the above mixture located between the granulated copper and the granulated zinc and with the tube in position between the poles of the magnet, the transmitter is switched on and the ultra shortwaves (300mhz) coming frmo it are received by the antennae mounted at each end of the tube and in contact with the copper and zinc respectively, the waves being thus passed through the copper and zinc and through the mixture

...so that the mixture is bombarded by the short waves and the cadmium, phosphorous and cobalt associated with the mixture become radioactive and release electrical energy which is transmitted to the granulated copper and the granulated zinc, causing a current to flow between them in a similar manner to the current produced by a thermocouple.

It has been established that with a mixture having the above composition, the optimum release of energy is obtained when the transmitter is operating at a frequency of 300mhz.

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The provision of a quartz tube is necessary for the mixture evolves a considerable amount of heat whileit is reacting to the bombardment of the short waves. It is found that the tube will only last for one hour and that the tube will become discharged after an hours operation, that is to say, the radioactivity of the tube will only last for one hour and it is therefore necessary, if the unit is to be run continuously, for the transmitter to be operated for a period of some fifteen to thirty seconds duration once every hour.

With a quartz tube having an overall length of some forty five millimetres and an inside diameter of five millimetres and containing thirty milligrams of the chemical mixture, the estimated energy which will be given off from the tube for a discharge of one hour, is 10 amps at between 100 and 110 volts. To enable the tube to give off this discharge, it is only necessary to operate the transmitter at the desired frequency for a period of some fifteen to thirty seconds duration.

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This is reminescent of the work of Paul Brown on his Resonant Nuclear Battery - The magnetic energy given off by alpha and beta particles is several orders of magnitude greater than either the kinetic energy or the direct electric energy produced by these same particles. However, the myriads of tiny magnetic fields existing at any time cannot be individually recognized or measured. This energy is not captured locally in nature to produce heat or mechanical effects, but instead the energy escapes undetected. Brown has invented a way to "organize" these magnetic fields so the great amounts of otherwise unobservable energy could be harnessed.

The weight of the strontium-90 used to generate 75 watts of power in the Nucell prototype is approximately the same as the weight of 2 millimeters of wire cut off the end of a small paper clip. Projected sizes of the Nucell battery will range from the size of a soup can to the size of a small barrel or waste can for a 50 kilowatt model.

The alpha and beta particles utilized in the Nucell battery have a limited ability to penetrate matter; alpha particles can be contained by a piece of paper; beta particles require 0.03" of aluminum. The Nucell battery is housed in a stainless steel, high-vacuum container, making it a safe, impermeable source of power.

Keelynet

Your (Mostly) Dead Predecessors

"Heavier-than-air flying machines are impossible." (Lord Kelvin, president, Royal Society, 1895)

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." (Thomas Watson, chairman of IBM, 1943)

"There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in their home." (Ken Olsen, president, chairman and founder of Digital Equipment Corp., 1977)

"The telephone has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us." (Western Union internal memo, 1876)

"Airplanes are interesting toys but of no military value." (Marshal Ferdinand Foch, French commander of Allied forces during the closing months of World War I, 1918)

"The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to nobody in particular?" (David Sarnoff's associates, in response to his urgings for investment in radio in the 1920's)

"Professor Goddard does not know the relation between action and reaction and the need to have something better than a vacuum against which to react. He seems to lack the basic knowledge ladled out daily in high schools." (New York Times editorial about Robert Goddard's revolutionary rocket work, 1921)

"Who the hell wants to hear actors talk?" (Harry M. Warner, Warner Brothers, 1927)

"Everything that can be invented has been invented." (Charles H. Duell, commissioner, US Office of Patents, 1899)

"The [flying] machine will eventually be fast; they will be used in sport, but they are not to be thought of as commercial carriers." -- Octave Chanute, aviation pioneer, 1904.

"The ordinary 'horseless carriage' is at present a luxury for the wealthy; and although its price will probably fall in the future, it will never come into as common use as the bicycle." -- The Literary Digest, 1889.

"[It] is, of course, altogether valueless.... Ours has been the first, and will doubtless be the last, party of whites to visit this profitless locality." -- Lt. Joseph D. Ives, Corps of Topographical Engineers, 1861, on the Grand Canyon.

"Landing and moving around on the moon offer so many serious problems for human beings that it may take science another 200 years to lick them." -- Science Digest, August, 1948.

"X rays are a hoax." "Aircraft flight is impossible." "Radio has no future." -- Physicist and mathematician Lord Kelvin (1824-1907)

"I think there is a world market for maybe five computers." -- Thomas Watson, Chairman, IBM, 1943.

"The bomb will never go off, and I speak as an expert in explosives." -- Adm. William Leahy, U.S. Atomic Energy Project, 1945.

"Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons." -- Popular Mechanics, 1949.

"We don't like their sound, and guitar music is on the way out." -- Decca Recording Co., in rejecting the Beatles, 1962.

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Guidelines for Alternative Science

Alternative science covers a wide range of interests. Generally, it includes gravity control, free energy, electronic healing techniques, all forms of energy conversion, antigravity, levitation, overunity, time travel (as well as slowing down or speeding up local time).

Also clearly covered is the art of power generation (ideally zero point or aether conversion), space travel, physics of matter and energy, sound/acoustics and how it can be used to produce useful phenomena, electric or magnetic forces to produce useful phenomena, various types of motors, vacuum energy, dimensional travel and shifts, medicine, hydrogen generation and how it is used.

It also covers oil/petroleum and how it can be used to produce energy and products, weather control for cancelling earthquakes, tsunamis, fires, floods and to produce rain or clear weather on demand, oxygen/ozone therapy, nitrogen as a motor driver, water generation and manipulation via steam and vacuum, ecological restoration techniques, biophysics, rejuvenation and an unending list of other subjects, most of which are accepted by 'orthodox' science.

Vanguard Sciences