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10/29/09 - Not dark energy, dark fluid
KeelyNet The simplest way of explaining the universe's acceleration is to invoke a cosmological constant, originally proposed by Einstein to allow the universe to remain the same size in the presence of matter. This describes a universe filled with uniform, outward-pushing energy. But there are other possible explanations for acceleration. One idea is that the entire universe exists on a membrane, or brane, floating inside an extra dimension. While matter will be confined to three dimensions, gravity could be leaking into this extra dimension. When the universe becomes large enough, this gravity could interact with matter in the brane, to produce acceleration on large scales. A deviation could also be a sign that dark energy is a more complex "fluid" that exerts varying pressures in different directions. The snag is that telling the difference between a more exotic form of dark energy and a modification to our understanding of gravity could be tricky. "If we were to detect a departure," says cosmologist Alessandra Silvestri of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, we might not be able to tell whether there is a flaw in general relativity or just evidence that dark energy is "some sort of fancy fluid". - Full Article Source and check out the theories of Osborne Reynolds where the Aether is a dilatant fluid at;

UFOs, Osborne Reynolds, and the One Wind
Osborne Reynolds' Submechanics of the Universe
A structured context for: matter, energy, space, time and PSI phenomena

Demonstration of Dilatancy in a Toy
Wacky Wall Crawlers - Patent 3,601,923

In 1968 while employed as a research engineer at the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, I invented a device which consisted of a dilatant fluid enclosed and sealed in a rubber sack. At the time I had no idea what dilatancy was, so I asked some of my associates in the physics department, got the basic vocabulary and set off to the Franklin Institute Library to do some research. This was the beginning of my education in rheology and the work of Osborne Reynolds. Also in 1968, totally unknown to me, the Osborne Reynolds Centennial Celebration was being conducted at the University of Manchester.

Whilst researching the prior art in dilatancy, I was surprised and intrigued to find, in a book on rheology (4, p. 4), that Osborne Reynolds' had based an entire theory of the universe on a dilatant medium. I continued to pursue my applications and subsequently received a patent on a toy (5) and later, through the US Navy, I was granted a patent on an impact absorber based on the same principle (6). The rheologically dilatant suspension used in my patents has a critical shear rate which can be kinaesthetically perceived on handling it. Below a critical shear rate it behaves as a liquid, above this rate it behaves as a solid. There seemed to be some analogy between this critical flow rate and relativistic phenomena at the speed of light.

"If the elastic container 10 is made up in the form of a snake or reptile, as shown in FIG. 15, having a head portion 68 and a body portion 70, a child can amuse himself and acquire tactile sensitivity in many ways. Thus he can elongate all or portions of the snake rapidly and form a plurality of lumps as in FIG. 9 which ultimately will become absorbed and when released and dropped on a surface will twist and wiggle until it returns fully to its original shape and form."

Speed is Everything

10/29/09 - iRobot's Soft Morphing Blob 'Bot Takes Its First Steps
The Pentagon has unveiled a new robot that's most a blob of goo. Called the "chemical robot," or ChemBot, it moves by changing its shape, by inflating and deflating different areas. Researchers say the research could lead to robots that can seep through cracks, and help rescue people trapped in collapsed buildings. / It gets around by way of a process called “jamming,” in which material can transition between semiliquid and solid states with only a slight change in volume. In ChemBot’s case, a flexible silicone skin encapsulates a series of pockets containing a mix of air and loosely packed particles. When air is removed from the compartments, the skin attempts to equalize the pressure differential by constricting the particles, which shift slightly to fill the void left by the evacuated air.(via http://www.therawfeed.com/) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Maple Seeds Inspire New Monocopter Flying Machine
Clark School Aerospace Engineering students solve 60-year-old design dilemma by mimicking Maple tree seeds. Kids call 'em "helicopters" -- maple seeds that rotate as they fall to the ground. They're actually monocopters because they have one blade. And, for 60 years, they've been an engineering dilemma. Graduate student Evan Ulrich is the primary inventor of a new flying machine modeled after the maple tree seed. It works. Ulrich demonstrated several of his devices to a gaggle of reporters on an engineering plaza in College Park, today. Ulrich placed the awkward looking device on the ground, walked back to his remote radio controller, and began turning controls. The machine vibrated. Its single propeller started turning, and, woosh, the gizmo was up in the air and flying. Ulrich, who will earn his doctorate in May, says the prototypes cost about $500 each. But the flying monocopter might turn into a $100 toy with enough mass production. How does it feel to fly it? "It's a blast," says inventor Ulrich. Two patent applications have been filed, and Ulrich envisions the toy version of this monocopter being in production within months. In the 1950s, researchers first tried to create an unmanned aerial vehicle that could mimic a maple seed's spiraling fall. Ever since, their attempts have been foiled by instability, resulting in a lack of control over the tiny (less than one meter) vehicles, which were easily knocked off course by wind. As recently as June 2009, this was considered as an open challenge for engineers. The Clark School students have solved the steering problem and provided a solution that allows the device to take off from the ground and hover, as well as perform controlled flight after its initial fall to the ground after being deployed from an aircraft. The device can also begin to hover during its initial descent, or after being launched by hand. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Electrisitree solar/wind energy in One
The growing popularity of solar panels — which capture renewable energy generated from the sun — should lead to new forms of solar panels that are more attractive than the common gray, flat panels seen on top of buildings, Strang said. His resulting invention, the Electrisitree, is the answer to that problem, he said. The fronds on the artificial palm tree, when put outside, would absorb light just like solar panels, said Strang. “They’re more aesthetically pleasing,” Strang said of the product. Eventually, Strang said, he plans to develop a version of the Electrisitree that would have spinning branches, so the machine would also function as a turbine, to capture wind power. Strang estimates one eight-foot tall tree would cost homeowners roughly $15,000 to install. One tree generates roughly 80 watts of power, according to Strang. It would take eight to power a 1,200-square-foot home, Strang said. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Competitors strive to create new life-forms
KeelyNet Building microscopic critters via genetic tinkering was confined to the world's most sophisticated laboratories a generation ago. But with more powerful computers and cheaper equipment, it is within reach of students at high schools, community colleges and universities, hundreds of whom are competing this year to create the coolest new organism on the planet. The International Genetically Engineered Machine (IGEM) competition, which will be held Halloween weekend at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., is built on the premise that life can be broken down into a warehouse of off-the-shelf, interchangeable parts and reassembled into creatures that have never existed. Adherents call this kind of science synthetic biology. Critics call it scary. "It's sold as, 'it's light, it's fun, it's hip, it's green.' It's not being sold as risky, as untested. One of the big concerns is that kids are being taught that DNA is a computer code, and you can program biological organisms the same way you can program a computer. I think that's going to prove to be a bad analogy." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Air Conditioned Bed Sheets to save Energy
AIR-CONDITIONED bed sheets, a contraption devised by a Tamworth inventor, have won first prize in a national competition to find the best new energy-saving products. The energy-saving sheets are designed to reduce the cost of cooling homes in warm climates at night. They work by blowing chilled air into the bed space either from a sort of leaky lilo placed above or under your top sheet or in your duvet. This would cool your top sheet or duvet. Alternatively, chilled air can be blown directly into the empty space in your mattress and this will cool your bottom sheet. The sheets have been patented, but they are still in the invention phase and have not yet been produced. Mike is on board with the company European Thermodynamics to produce the sheets, he just needs an investor to help fund production. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Creepy Human Gait Robot
Boston Dynamics is at it again. This time, they’ve created a creepy biped with a natural gait. It may look very similar to BigDog, because it really is almost the same system. Named PETMAN, this biped system is being designed to help test chemical protection suits. This bot can stress the suit by walking, running, and even crawling in a room filled with poison gas. Not only can PETMAN walk, run, and crawl, but it can also sweat and change its temperature. That’s pretty cool. Like BigDog, the most impressive part is when they give it a shove and it recovers with a motion that seems almost organic. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Using Plasma to produce Nanoparticles
Plasma is like a gas, but many of its atoms have been stripped of an electron or two. These positively charged atoms swim about in a crackling-hot sea of negatively charged loose electrons, making plasmas great electrical conductors. Scientists have harnessed it to make welding torches, fluorescent lights and bright, sharp big-screen TVs, as well as those glass novelty globes full of snaking purple current that make your hair stand on end when you touch them. But plasma can do more, much more, and Idaho National Laboratory's Peter Kong is giving the world a glimpse of its true potential. Kong, technical lead for plasma processing at INL, has built a career of putting plasma to work. He's using it to mass-produce nanoparticles, a project that in August received $1 million in federal stimulus funding. He's also employing plasma to find ways to store hydrogen efficiently, and he'll soon start a project using plasma to convert natural gas, coal and heavy oil to gasoline and diesel. These last two efforts could help the United States break its addiction to foreign oil and, perhaps, to fossil fuels altogether. "I found plasma to be a very interesting subject," he says, "one that could be applied to a lot of areas other than welding, cutting or spraying." One of these areas is the production of nanoparticles, bits of matter tens of thousands of times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. Because nanoparticles are so tiny, a high percentage of their constituent atoms are on their surfaces rather than hidden away inside. Surface interactions thus dominate the lives of nanoparticles, and as a result, nano-sized specks of a particular substance often have different physical and chemical properties than larger chunks. Scientists are just beginning to exploit nanoparticles, but they hold great promise in many applications, including anti-microbial and cancer-fighting drugs, stronger, corrosion-resistant materials and more efficient solar panels, fuel cells and batteries. But nanoparticles can be difficult and expensive to make. Kong is hoping to change that with his unique Plasma Nanoparticle Fabricator, a man-sized conglomeration of cables and shiny steel that looks a bit like a robotic squid. Sand-size grains of material fed into the PNF get vaporized by a plasma arc exceeding 12,000 degrees Celsius, twice as hot as the surface of the sun. As the vapor exits the reactor's processing zone, the gas cools down so fast—a rate of 1 million degrees per second—that its atoms have very little time to glom together. Each atom clumps with only a few others, forming nanoparticles. Other nanoparticle-production methods grind raw materials down, burn them up using fossil fuels or dunk them in various chemical baths. But Kong's PNF is a step above. It makes high-quality (very small and relatively uniform) nanoparticles more cheaply and can handle a wider range of raw materials. And, because it converts 100 percent of its feedstock to nanoparticles, it generates no byproducts. Other conventional plasma reactors can't come close to this conversion rate, which the PNF achieves with a much longer plasma arc. Also contributing are the higher, more uniform temperatures in the PNF's processing zones, and the fact that raw materials remain in these zones for longer periods of time. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Gyrowheel: Revolutionary Way To Learn To Ride A Bicycle
The Gyrowheel has a fast spinning disk inside that can spin for up to three hours on a full charge of its built-in rechargeable NiMH battery. The spinning disk is completely enclosed for safety. The Gyrowheel replaces the front wheel of the child’s bike, and the spinning disk inside keeps the bike upright and stable, even when a wobbling child is aboard. The Gyrowheel has three speeds, with the highest speed being the most stable. At this speed the wheel is able to resist knocks and shoves even when it is stationary, and without a bicycle attached can travel upright, letting itself down gently when it stops. The gyroscope gives the bicycle high stability even at very slow speeds. As the novice rider gathers more confidence, the speed can be decreased, until the child is riding unaided. The Gyrowheel has been tested on over a hundred children, and all learned to ride very quickly without needing training wheels. Daniella Reichstetter, the CEO of Gyrobike, the Gyrowheel’s developer, explained that the old system of training wheels did nothing more than stop the child falling over, and could start the novice off with bad habits and riding techniques that had to be unlearned when the training wheels were removed. The wheel was originally intended to teach someone how to ride a unicycle, but Reichstetter and her team soon realized the device could be used equally well on a young child’s bicycle to help them learn more safely and quickly. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Carbon Nanotubes Make Tomatoes Grow Faster
Tomato seeds exposed to nanoparticles in the form of carbon nanotubes that are only 1/50,000 the width of a human hair, sprouted sooner and grew faster in what researchers are describing as a step toward the “goals of nanoagriculture.” - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - First Hyperlens For Sound Waves Created
KeelyNet Ultrasound and underwater sonar devices could “see” a big improvement, thanks to development of the world’s first acoustic hyperlens. Created by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the acoustic hyperlens provides an eightfold boost in the magnification power of sound-based imaging technologies. Clever physical manipulation of the imaging sound waves enables the hyperlens to resolve details smaller than one sixth the length of the waves themselves, bringing into view much smaller objects and features than can be detected using today’s technologies. The key to this success is the capturing of information contained in evanescent waves, which carry far more details and higher resolution than propagating waves but are typically bound to the vicinity of the source and decay much too quickly to be captured by a conventional lens. “We have successfully carried out an experimental demonstration of an acoustic hyperlens that magnifies sub-wavelength objects by gradually converting evanescent waves into propagating waves,” said Xiang Zhang, a principal investigator with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and director of the Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center at the University of California, Berkeley. “Our acoustic hyperlens relies on straightforward cutoff-free propagation and achieves deep subwavelength resolution with low loss over a broad frequency bandwidth.” Zhang and his co-authors fashioned their acoustic hyperlens from 36 brass fins arranged in the shape of a hand-held fan. Each fin is approximately 20 centimeters long and three millimeters thick. The fins, embedded in the brass plate from which they were milled, extend out from an inner radius of 2.7 centimeters to an outer radius of 21.8 centimeters, and span 180 degrees in the angular direction. “As a result of the large ratio between the inner and outer radii, our acoustic hyperlens compresses a significant portion of evanescent waves into the band of propagating waves so that the image obtained is magnified by a factor of eight,” says co-author Fok, a graduate student in Zhang’s lab. “We chose brass as the material for the fins because it has a density about 7,000 times that of air, a large ratio that is needed to achieve the strong anisotropy required for a flat dispersion of the sound waves.” / (This is PURE KEELY! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Getting bugged by e-mail subpoenas
KeelyNet What if Congress proposed that every telephone call made or received in the United States should be recorded, just in case something anyone said might later be relevant in a legal proceeding? You'd be outraged. I'd be outraged. Those on the left, on the right and on the yellow line down the middle of the political road would see it as an unconscionable invasion of privacy and march on Capitol Hill with pitchforks and torches to be sure such a proposal never passed. If the law wants to put our conversations under surveillance, it had better first prove to a judge that it has a very good reason for doing so. So where is our outrage over the way judges and lawyers now are often able to go back in time and retrospectively listen in on our e-mail and text exchanges? These exchanges are often as loose and unguarded as actual spoken conversations -- sloppy, blunt, intimate, haphazard -- but because they usually end up living on some disk or server somewhere whether we want them to or not, the courts, with a little effort, can go back and, in effect, eavesdrop... Just as it would be a shame if we had to conduct all our private conversations as though a judge and jury were listening, it's become a shame that the cautious person must make that very assumption when conducting private e-conversations via instant message, text or mail services. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Alcohol Activates Cellular Changes That Make Tumor Cells Spread
Alcohol consumption has long been linked to cancer and its spread, but the underlying mechanism has never been clear. Now, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have identified a cellular pathway that may explain the link. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Highway Hypnosis
KeelyNet Highway hypnosis is a mental state in which the person can drive a truck or automobile great distances, responding to external events in the expected manner with no recollection of having consciously done so. In this state the driver's conscious mind is apparently fully focused elsewhere, with seemingly direct processing of the masses of information needed to drive safely. 'Highway Hypnosis' is just one manifestation of a relatively commonplace experience, theoretically where the conscious and subconscious minds appear to concentrate on different things; workers performing simple and repetitive tasks and people deprived of sleep are likely to experience similar symptoms. Therefore, it is a sort of subconscious "driving mode." / (Reminds me of how chickens are hypnotized by drawing a chalk line and putting their beak on it so they go into a catatonic trance...see my 3 eBooks on Hypnotic Phenomena and how to do it. - JWD) - Full Article Source and Hypnosis eBooks 3 for $24.95 on CD

10/29/09 - Mind control via serial port
KeelyNet Zibri] found a very simple method for using brain waves as a controller via a DB9 serial port. He’s using Uncle Milton’s Force Trainer which we saw yesterday in the brain controlled Arduino. In that project the Arduino tapped into the LEDs and interfaced those signals with a computer via USB. This time the connection was made using an RS-232 transceiver to pass data from the programming header inside of the toy’s base unit to a computer over the serial port. Tapping into the programming header has a lot more potential and should be more reliable than sniffing logic out of LED connections. [Zibri] has written an application to display the received data but it doesn’t look like he’s made the code available for download. Apparently he tipped us off about a week ago. We recall seeing this submission but as you can tell it’s a little bit light on the detail. So if you want your tips to be at the front of the line, make sure you do what you can to fill us in on all the details of your project. At our request [Zibri] provided a picture of the PCB from the Force Trainer’s base unit. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - The Force Trainer brings Star Wars to Life
KeelyNet Ever wanted to use the force to move objects with your brain? Will it may not be possible without the use of technology, but where there’s a will, there’s a way. The Force Trainer comes with a headset that uses brain waves to allow players to manipulate a sphere within a clear 10-inch-tall training tower. The wireless headset reads your brain activity, in a simplified version of EEG medical tests, and the circuitry translates it to physical action. If you focus well enough, the training sphere will rise in the tower. A state of deep concentration is needed to achieve a Force-full effect. Star Wars sound effects and audio clips are emitted from the base unit to cue progress to the next level (from Padawan to Jedi). The Force Trainer is expected to sell for between $90 and $100. / Scientists call the technology BCI, or Brain Computer Interface, and more sensitive, medical-grade versions are used to help amputees move artificial limbs and victims of paralysis communicate using a computer and software that reacts thought. The Force Trainer, expected to sell for about $120, is not medical-grade hardware, but it uses a headset to monitor the brain, and then transmits a signal to a base that features a fan and a ball in a tube. The headset is calibrated to sense beta waves, a specific type of brain waves associated with concentration. When you focus, the headset reads the electrical pattern from inside your head and sends a signal to a microchip that switches on the fan in the base unit and levitates the pingpong in a clear tube. The more intense the focus and concentration, the faster the fan spins and the quicker the ball rises. When concentration is broken or weak, the ball drops. A computer chip programmed with the voice of Yoda the Jedi master guides users through several increasingly different levels of control. Another mind toy, Mattel’s Mind Flex, uses the same mind-bending technology to guide a ball through a series of obstacles. It will be available in the fall. / The toy company Uncle Milton brings you closer than ever to the Force with its Star Wars Force Trainer. As part of its new series of Star Wars science products unveiled at the 2009 NY Toy Fair, the Force Trainer will help budding Jedis learn to master their thoughts and channel their own powers of the Force. The Force Trainer comes with a headset and base unit. Once the user places the headset on, this component captures brain signals and sends that information to the base unit which controls a floating ball, or Training Sphere, similar to the one found in the first Star Wars movie (episode IV). The more the user can focus their mind on something, the higher the Training Sphere will float within a clear tube chamber. To control the height of the ball, the user has to control the intensity of their brain activity, a challenging balance between active concentration and mental rest. The voice of Yoda helps guide the user through mastery of all 15 levels of game play. The Force Trainer will become available this coming August and will cost just under $130. - Full Article Source and Star Wars Shop - Force Trainer $129.99

10/29/09 - (Colored) Lights Help Injured Mice Walk Again
KeelyNet "Researchers have been able to affect the brains of lab mice using light. Working in a new field called Optogenetics (optical stimulation plus genetic engineering), scientists injected lab mice with genes that can stimulate or inhibit neural activity based on the color of the light they're exposed to, and can be targeted to infect only on certain cell types. Additionally, another gene has been added to make neurons glow green when firing, allowing two-way communication between a brain and a machine." - Full Article Source and Spectro-Chrome Color Therapy and Uses of Color and Dinshah Health Society

10/29/09 - Swiss Experimenter Breeds Swarm Intelligence
"Researchers simulated evolution with multiple generations of food-seeking robots in a new study of artificial swarm intelligence. 'Under some conditions, sophisticated communication evolved,' says one researcher. And in a more recent study, the swarms of bots didn't just evolve cooperative strategies — they also evolved the ability to deceive. ('Forget zombies,' joked one commenter. 'This is the real threat.') 'The study of artificial swarm intelligence provides insight into the nature of intelligence in general, and offers an interesting perspective on the nature of Darwinian selection, competition, and cooperation.' And there's also some cool video of the bots in action." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Clean Smells Promote Ethical Behavior
"The researchers see implications for workplaces, retail stores and other organizations that have relied on traditional surveillance and security measures to enforce rules. Perhaps the findings could be applied at home, too, Liljenquist said with a smile. 'Could be that getting our kids to clean up their rooms might help them clean up their acts, too.' The study titled "The Smell of Virtue" was unusually simple and conclusive. Participants engaged in several tasks, the only difference being that some worked in unscented rooms, while others worked in rooms freshly spritzed with Windex." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Nigerian "Scam Police" Shut Down 800 Web Sites
KeelyNet "Nigerian police, in what is named Operation 'Eagle Claw,' have shut down 800 scam web sites and arrested members of 18 syndicates behind the fraudulent scam sites. Reports on Breitbart.com and Pointblank give details on the busts. The investigation was done in cooperation with Microsoft to help develop smart technology software capable of detecting fraudulent emails. From Breitbart: 'When operating at full capacity, within the next six months, the scheme, dubbed "Eagle Claw," should be able to forewarn around a quarter of million potential victims.'" (Give these guys a raise! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - New Optomechanical Crystal Allows Confinement of Light and Sound
"Physicists and engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed a nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound. The interaction of light quanta (photons) and sound quanta (phomons) are so strong that they produce significant mechanical vibrations. 'Indeed, Painter points out, the interactions between sound and light in this device—dubbed an optomechanical crystal—can result in mechanical vibrations with frequencies as high as tens of gigahertz, or 10 billion cycles per second. Being able to achieve such frequencies, he explains, gives these devices the ability to send large amounts of information, and opens up a wide array of potential applications—everything from lightwave communication systems to biosensors capable of detecting (or weighing) a single macromolecule. It could also, Painter says, be used as a research tool by scientists studying nanomechanics. "These structures would give a mass sensitivity that would rival conventional nanoelectromechanical systems because light in these structures is more sensitive to motion than a conventional electrical system is."'" - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - "2012" a Miscalculation; Actual Calendar Ends 2220
KeelyNet "News is spreading quickly here that scientists writing in a popular science periodical (Dutch) have debunked the 2012 date (google translation linked) featuring so prominently in doomsday predictions/speculation across the web. On 2012-12-21, the sun will appear where you would normally be able to see the 'galactic equator' of the Milky Way; an occurrence deemed special because it happens 'only' once every 25.800 years, on the winter solstice. However, even if you ignore the fact that there is no actual galactic equator, just an observed one, and that the visual effect is pretty much the same for an entire decade surrounding that date, there are major problems with the way the Maya Calendar is being read by doomsday prophets." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Tesla Roadster Breaks Distance Record For Electric Car
"The CEO of an Australian ISP has driven his Tesla Roadster into the record books, completing 501km on a single electric charge in the 2009 Global Green Challenge — beating the Roadster's official specifications, which rate the all-electric sports car as being capable of a maximum of 390km (242mph) per charge. The previous record was held by another Roadster in the 387km Rallye Monte Carlo d'Energies Alternatives in April this year. In a race specifically designed for alternative energy vehicles (such as hydrogen and electricity), the Roadster was the only vehicle to complete the entire course. Though to be fair, that race course was a mixture of twists, turns and hills." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Russia Develops Spaceship With Nuclear Engine
KeelyNet "The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos has developed a design for a piloted spacecraft powered by a nuclear engine, the head of the agency said on Wednesday. 'The project is aimed at implementing large-scale space exploration programs,' Anatoly Perminov said at a meeting of the commission on the modernization of the Russian economy. He added that the development of Megawatt-class nuclear space power systems (MCNSPS) for manned spacecraft was crucial for Russia if the country wanted to maintain a competitive edge in the space race, including the exploration of the Moon and Mars." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Study Says US Needs Fewer? Science Students
'It's an article of faith: the United States needs more native-born students in science and other technical fields. But a new paper by sociologists at the Urban Institute and Rutgers University contradicts the notion of a shrinking supply of native-born talent in the United States. In fact, the supply has actually remained steady over the past 30 years, the researchers conclude, while the highest-performing students in the pipeline are opting out of science and engineering in greater numbers than in the past, suggesting that the threat to American economic competitiveness comes not from inadequate science training in school and college but from a lack of incentives that would make science and technology careers attractive. Cranking out even more science graduates, according to the researchers, does not give corporations any incentive to boost wages for science/tech jobs, which would be one way to retain the highest-performing students.' - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Auto parts makers target new markets
KeelyNet In reaction to the auto meltdown, Canadian firms are looking at aerospace. mining, alternative energy producers and even lawn mowers. “We just know it's not good to have your eggs in one basket,” says Marty Solcz, executive vice-president and chief operating officer of the privately held company. The automotive meltdown over the past year has delivered a blaring wakeup call to Canada's auto parts makers – the need to diversify. The near failures of General Motors Corp. and Chrysler LLC sent shock waves through the North American parts industry as plummeting vehicle production battered business for many companies. Eager to insulate themselves from any further deterioration in the sector, parts companies are now hitching their fortunes to broader industrial areas by tapping into everything from solar and wind energy technology to consumer products, aerospace and mining equipment. Auto production cutbacks have put an end to an era when simply shipping to assembly plants in Ontario and the U.S. Midwest was enough. One such program is to produce power conversion units for Stirling Energy Systems, which builds solar dishes that convert the sun's energy to electrical power. Stirling is supplying a solar farm in the Mojave Desert and will begin manufacturing 100 of its SunCatcher units a day next year. Tapping the expertise of auto parts makers on such projects makes sense, notes Jeff Collins, vice-president of global supply chain for Stirling, which is in Scottsdale, Ariz. “From a buyer perspective, there is no industry like the auto industry in terms of taking a concept, assisting the customer in developing the concept, incorporating ideas like design for manufacturability, design for assembly [and] design for serviceability,” Mr. Collins says. The contract, which will generate $200-million in revenue annually for Linamar, involves more than a supplier shipping a part, he says. “It's tapping into their engineering capability, their knowledge of manufacturing, their knowledge of their supply chain and their thinking about how to assemble this in high volume.” Linamar has set up a so-called skunk works team that will do research and development into new products and processes at the technology centre the company opened in Guelph last month. In another move to tap the auto parts industry's expertise, Stirling has sourced the reflective surface in the SunCatcher's 11.6-metre-in-diameter parabolic dish to metal basher Tower Automotive LLC. Toronto-based Martinrea, which competes against Tower for auto maker contracts, is using its expertise in metal forming to find new customers. “You've got a stamping press, it doesn't really care what it's stamping,” says chief operating officer Nick Orlando. “If you want to stamp parts for air conditioners or parts for washing machines, refrigerators, stoves, it really doesn't matter.” (You see this Jim R.? - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - 'Younger wife' for marital bliss
The secret to a happy marriage for men is choosing a wife who is smarter and at least five years younger than you, say UK experts. These pairings are more likely to go the distance, particularly if neither has been divorced in the past, according to the Bath University team. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - The Sex-Housework Link
KeelyNet Housework may seem like the ultimate romance-killer. But guess what? A new study shows that for husbands and wives alike, the more housework you do, the more often you are likely to have sex with your spouse. Earlier studies have hinted at this connection for men; the sight of a husband mopping the floor or doing dishes sparks affection in the hearts of many wives. But the more-housework-equals-more-sex link for wives, documented in a study of 6,877 married couples published online recently in the Journal of Family Issues, is a surprise. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - That money is washing away
There's a growing public workforce, retiring early but living longer while drawing benefits. Do the math. The basic problem is that pension funds created to finance retirement benefits for thousands of public employees -- teachers, police officers, firefighters, and state, city and county workers of every description -- lack sufficient funds to meet their obligations. The result could be sharp reductions in future benefits, significant tax increases, or both. In 1950, about two-and-a-half times as many Americans were employed in manufacturing as in government -- 15 million in manufacturing, 6 million in government. Today, governments have 22.5 million employees, while manufacturing has 13.4 million. No state has added either construction or manufacturing employees in the past recessionary year. But 32 states have added government employees. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Cash for Clunkers Tab: $24,000 Per Vehicle
KeelyNet This summer's so-called Cash for Clunkers program cost taxpayers $24,000 per vehicle sold, according to an analysis by Edmunds.com. Nearly 690,000 vehicles were sold during the Cash for Clunkers program, officially known as the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS), but Edmunds.com analysts indicate that only 125,000 of the sales were incremental. The rest of the sales would have happened anyway. Analysts divided three billion dollars by 125,000 vehicles to arrive at the average $24,000 per vehicle sold. The average transaction price in August was $26,915 minus an average cash rebate of $1,667. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Tintii Gives Colorful Boost to People and Objects in Your Photos
KeelyNet Windows/Mac/Linux: If you're a fan of photos that are desaturated save for an interesting burst of color left behind—often a vibrant one like a yellow flower or red carpet—Tintii makes it easy to play with the technique. Tintii is available as a stand-alone tool, the one we're reviewing here, and as a plugin for Photoshop and Paint Shop Pro. The stand-alone version is free to try out the application, activating the plugins costs $16. For casual use however the stand-alone version is more than adequate for tinkering and experimenting with your photos. The sample photo in the screenshot above only took a matter of seconds to tinker with before we arrived at a pleasing outcome. Tintii has a host of settings which are probably best played with to see their full effects. You can adjust the decay and edge parameters for both saturation and hue, increase the number of color detections—it starts with the basic primary colors but you can increase from there activating and deactivating colors within the photo's palette. Finally you can play with the channel mixer to further push and tweak the colors. Tintii is available as a free stand-alone tool, registering the plugins is $16. Tintii is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - UN investigator warns US on use of drones
A U.N. human rights investigator warned the United States Tuesday that its use of unmanned warplanes to carry out targeted executions may violate international law. Philip Alston said that unless the Obama administration explains the legal basis for targeting particular individuals and the measures it is taking to comply with international humanitarian law which prohibits arbitrary executions, "it will increasingly be perceived as carrying out indiscriminate killings in violation of international law." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Faster Maintenance with Augmented Reality
KeelyNet In the not-too-distant future, it might be possible to slip on a pair of augmented-reality (AR) goggles instead of fumbling with a manual while trying to repair a car engine. Instructions overlaid on the real world would show how to complete a task by identifying, for example, exactly where the ignition coil was, and how to wire it up correctly. A new AR system developed at Columbia University starts to do just this, and testing performed by Marine mechanics suggests that it can help users find and begin a maintenance task in almost half the usual time. A user wears a head-worn display, and the AR system provides assistance by showing 3-D arrows that point to a relevant component, text instructions, floating labels and warnings, and animated, 3-D models of the appropriate tools. An Android-powered G1 smart phone attached to the mechanic's wrist provides touchscreen controls for cueing up the next sequence of instructions. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Software That Fixes Itself
Martin Rinard, a professor of computer science at MIT, is unabashed about the ultimate goal of his group's research: "delivering an immortal, invulnerable program." When a potentially harmful vulnerability is discovered in a piece of software, it takes nearly a month on average for human engineers to come up with a fix and to push the fix out to affected systems, according to a report issued by security company Symantec in 2006. Rinard's group hopes that its new software, called ClearView, will speed this process up, making software significantly more resilient against failure or attack. ClearView works without assistance from humans and without access to a program's underlying source code (an often proprietary set of instructions that defines how a piece of software will behave). Instead, the system monitors the behavior of a binary: the form the program takes in order to execute instructions on a computer's hardware. By observing a program's normal behavior and assigning a set of rules, ClearView detects certain types of errors, particularly those caused when an attacker injects malicious input into a program. When something goes wrong, ClearView detects the anomaly and identifies the rules that have been violated. It then comes up with several potential patches designed to force the software to follow the violated rules. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Insecurity not education determines church attendance
KeelyNet The long-standing theory has been that the higher educated someone is the less religious he will be. But new research in 60 countries proves otherwise. It is economic security that leaves churches empty. "Higher educated people rely more on facts and less on beliefs that can't be validated or are clearly false. Or at least that's the theory," Van Tubergen says. "But that's not what we've seen." Why not, he can't say. "That's not what we investigated, but we have a hunch. Other research has shown that highly educated people are indeed less religious. But at the same time they tend to be more actively involved in political parties, associations and thus also in churches. Less educated people are more religious, but less active about it. There is a higher rate of churchgoers amongst educated believers than low-skilled believers." The two other elements of modernisation can be explained: economic (in)security and the nature of social relationships. "Economic uncertainty has enormous impact on church attendance. In countries with large socio-economic inequality, the rich often go to church because they too could lose everything tomorrow, as was clear from the dramatic collapse of Enron and Lehman Brothers." Religiosity is also strongly influenced by the social environment, says Van Tubergen. "There have to be parents, neighbours or fellow villagers who say 'let's go' or 'why have I not seen you in church on Sunday?' Whether your friends are practising, what your teachers tell you and how your future partner feels about it are major influences. People who grow up in a religious environment often remain very religious." But changes in life can change that pattern, such as moving to a city and decreasing social control as a result of that. People who do so are more likely to become detached from their religion. On the other hand, religious communities tend to be very close-knit and children often remain in the community," Ruiter says. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Deep brain stimulation eases tics in Tourette's syndrome
Deep brain stimulation, already used for treating Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia, can ease the tics and other symptoms associated with Tourette's syndrome, British researchers reported today in the journal Neurology. Tourette's is a congenital neuropsychiatric disease affecting an estimated 1% of the population. It is characterized by physical tics, such as eye blinking, shoulder shrugging and head-and-shoulder jerking. It is also marked by vocal outbursts, many of which are obscene, providing great embarrassment. Sufferers often also have obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. There is no cure for Tourette's and no medication that works in all patients. Deep brain stimulation involves embedding electrodes deep in the brain--often called a brain pacemaker--and applying a minute electrical current to specific areas of the brain, depending on the condition being treated. Its underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Isolated case reports have suggested that the technique might be useful in Tourette's, so Dr. Andrea Cavanna of the University of Birmingham and her colleagues decided to perform a formal study. They treated 18 patients, with an average age of 30, who also had obsessive-compulsive disorder and who did not respond to other forms of therapy. Three of the patients were lost to follow-up. But the other 15, who were followed for two years, had an average of 52% fewer tics and a 26% to 33% improvement in the symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. The treatment did not interfere with their cognitive abilities. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Halloween props: Servo eyes (watch the video)
KeelyNet If you’re wanting to spice up a Jack-o-lantern, why not give it some spooky eyes that will look around? [todbot] shows us how to set this up using an Arduino and 3 servos. His rig uses a hobby servo to control the entire head’s orientation and a smaller servo for each eye’s movement. Their motion is random, but quite convincing. He has them all stuck together with popsicle sticks, but you would probably move the location of the large servo to rotate the entire pumpkin, or whatever other prop you put it all in. You can download the Arduino sketch and give it a try your self. We might suggest building a simple rack and pinion rig to rotate both eyeballs with a single servo. / (I saw these at the Exploratorium in San Francisco several years ago, but their's had a tracking sensor so the eyes FOLLOWED YOU! - JWD) - Full Article Source and Video - Scary Shifty Servo Eyeballs and Halloween prop: glowing spooky LED eyes

10/29/09 - The Underground Market of Sperm Donors
KeelyNet Those "in need" are single women, lesbian couples, and married couples challenged by male infertility who can't afford the expense -- or in some countries, who don't have the "right" social status -- for traditional sperm banks. Trent is an independent contractor in a growing online gray market of free sperm donors. This market now includes Craigslist ads, Yahoo groups with names like Free Sperm Donors or Spermdonorneed, and websites like DIY Baby, the Free Fertility Clinic, and Feelingbroody.com, a site in the United Kingdom that acts as a matchmaker between free donors and women desiring to become pregnant. Big sperm clinics evolved in order to give women more control by making the process of getting a sperm donor less secretive and safer, and also to offer the highest-quality product. Today, that means genetically sound, disease-free sperm that has been quarantined for six months. That's just the minimum to meet FDA mandates. Donors also pass psychological health checks, background checks, and tout their Ivy League degrees or resemblance to A-list celebrities. Dr. Cappy Rothman, the medical director of the California Cryobank, told me that his customers will walk away knowing more about their donor than he does about his wife of 40 years. The problem is that with less secrecy and more established legal standards, sperm donation has also become an expensive and exclusive process. Vials of sperm cost up to $500 each, and an insemination through a private doctor's office can run more than $1,000 for each pregnancy attempt, depending upon one's insurance. Single women and lesbian couples now make up 50 percent of the business of sperm banks like the California Cryobank, which sells on average 30,000 vials of sperm a year. In the United Kingdom, clinics that are part of the national health care system will not inseminate a single woman in her 20s, nor will they offer any background information about a donor. Unlike in the United States, the concept of an "Open Identity" donor who would give the child the opportunity to meet his or her biological father at 18 does not exist in the United Kingdom. And for donors, says Rothman, "It's now harder to get accepted to our bank than it is to get into Harvard. We only accept nine out every 1,000 applications." This has led to the booming gray market. Since free sperm donors are the Wild West of sperm donation, there are no official statistics on how many there are. Based on an extensive web search, most of the donors are based in the United States and England, but some come from as far away as Bahrain. There has been no official legal crackdown on free sperm donors because technically it's not illegal, but the FDA does have mandated requirement that sperm donors must meet. "If it was a sperm bank not meeting the mandate, no one would be arrested and thrown in jail for a civil suit, but the bank would be shut down," says Dr. Rothman. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Painful ‘4-hour erection’ may soon be history
A research team from United States and China suggests adenosine deaminase enzyme therapy could successfully prevent or treat penile fibrosis in men with priapism. Penile fibrosis is a condition associated with the build up of scar tissue and eventual impotency. “Coping with priapism is hard enough, but knowing that it can ultimately lead to fibrosis within the penis adds insult to injury,” said Dr Gerald Weissmann, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, where the study is published. “Because of our study, we have revealed that increased adenosine signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the progression of priapism to penile fibrosis,” said Yang Xia, a scientist involved in the study from the University of Texas-Houston Medical School’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “This finding led to a novel therapeutic possibility to treat and prevent this dangerous complication seen in priapic humans by targeting on this signaling pathway in the near future,” Xi added. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Exploring With an Armada of Autonomous Robots
KeelyNet JPL has a fun article on their website detailing what future robotic exploration might entail: an armada of robots could one day fly above the mountain tops of Saturn's moon Titan, cross its vast dunes and sail in its liquid lakes. This is the vision of Wolfgang Fink, from the California Institute of Technology. He says we are on the brink of a great paradigm shift in planetary exploration, and the next round of robotic explorers will be nothing like what we see today. "The way we explore tomorrow will be unlike any cup of tea we've ever tasted," said Fink. "We are departing from traditional approaches of a single robotic spacecraft with no redundancy that is Earth-commanded to one that allows for having multiple, expendable low-cost robots that can command themselves or other robots at various locations at the same time." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Toyota to release solar charger for electric vehicles
Toyota is developing a solar charging station for electric cars and plug-in hybrids, making a green technology even greener. It has also designed a battery charger for mounting inside an electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid to recharge the storage batteries. Toyota's solar charging station will consist of solar cells capable of generating 100/200V of electricity. The station includes storage batteries to store the electricity generated until it is required to recharge electric vehicles. The station also has a communication facility to authenticate users' identification information, and to communicate the amount of charge and other data to a remote data center. The communication system is expected to use LANs and Mobile networks. Earlier this year Toyota Industries unveiled a new public charging station for electric vehicles, which went on sale a few months ago at a cost of 450,000 Yen (around 4,600USD). Both the earlier public charging station and the new solar charging system were developed in collaboration with Nitto Kogyo Corporation. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Discovery - chemical that attracts mosquitoes to humans
KeelyNet The groundbreaking research, published this week in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains why mosquitoes shifted hosts from birds to humans and paves the way for key developments in mosquito and disease control. Entomology professor Walter Leal and postdoctoral researcher Zain Syed found that nonanal (sounds like NAWN-uh-nawl) is the powerful semiochemical that triggers the mosquitoes' keen sense of smell, directing them toward a blood meal. A semiochemical is a chemical substance or mixture that carries a message. "Nonanal is how they find us," Leal said. "The antennae of the Culex quinquefasciatus are highly developed to detect even extremely low concentrations of nonanal." Mosquitoes detect smells with the olfactory receptor neurons of their antennae. Leal and Syed found that nonanal acts synergistically with carbon dioxide, a known mosquito attractant. "We baited mosquito traps with a combination of nonanal and carbon dioxide and we were drawing in as many as 2,000 a night in Yolo County, near Davis," Syed said. "Nonanal, in combination with carbon dioxide, increased trap captures by more than 50 percent, compared to traps baited with carbon dioxide alone." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Finalists announced for Twitter star seance
The Tweance? Yes, the Halloween seance to be performed upon the heavenly medium that is Twitter. Famous and entirely reliable psychic Jayne Wallace is to tweet her way to and through heaven and hell this Friday, between the hours of 10 a.m. and midday British Thoroughly Awful Time (3 a.m. to 5 a.m. Pacific) An attempt to use the gestalt of Twitter to contact Michael Jackson, Kurt Cobain, River Phoenix and William Shakespeare. Yes, you can go to twitter.com/Tweance at the appointed time and listen to William Shakespeare himself. - Full Article Source

KeelyNet

10/28/09 - Imagine a world without America...
KeelyNet On the front blackboard was what looked like a piece of modern art; different colored streaks like jagged lightning descending from upper left to lower right. I walked in and discovered it was a chart detailing the decline of every major civilization, the Roman, the Greek, the Persian, the Carthaginian, the Ottoman; even the Mayan and Aztec. Decline! "Could this ever happen to America?" I thought about that for about eight seconds before deciding, "No!" The world loved us too much. And they had a lot of reason to love us even more than they did.

No. We're here for keeps. So, here comes professor Niall Ferguson with a convincing argument that America is waving a feeble goodbye while China is storming onto center stage. He may be right, particularly considering present management, but it may stall or even reverse America's decline if enough Americans put aside the Niagara of anti-Americanism – imported and domestic – and consider how far up America is declining from.

Who, from professor to peasant, is able to name another country that ever amassed more power and abused it less than America? Or, amassed more wealth and distributed it more fairly? What other country was ever attacked, then rallied and destroyed the aggressors and, instead of the traditional rape and plunder, rewarded its attackers with rehabilitation and democracy? And what country ever won a war and wound up with less territory than when the war began?

After spending much blood and treasure ejecting the Japanese from the Philippines, America gave the Philippines independence. The victorious Soviet forces subjugated Eastern Europe. Victorious American and British forces liberated Western Europe. All we asked from the nations we liberated was enough land to bury our dead.

Continents don't forget things like that quickly. Every German mother in that war prayed that her son would be captured by the Americans or the British, not the Soviets. That kind of compliment is not achieved by propaganda. Far from least and far from last, America had the nuclear bomb exclusively for four solid years. After the war it was never used, not even to brandish, blackmail or bluff.

Instead, America took the lead and founded the United Nations, fully allowing for America to be out-voted as that great "Parliament of Man" became a VIP lounge for dictators, aggressors, oppressors, thugs, thieves, sexual predators and other varieties of truly awful people.

Folk wisdom tells us, "Be nice to those you meet on your way up. You may meet them again on your way down." America was nice on our way up. A rip-roaring patriot published a list of almost a hundred countries that owed their existence, their freedom or their prosperity to America. I could only challenge the inclusion of two or three. "The world looks DOWN on America with the UTMOST ENVY." - Full Article Source

KeelyNet

~ ~ ~ 10/28/09 - Your attention for a moment please! ~ ~ ~
As you might know, KeelyNet went down last Friday from a crashed hard drive and worse on Dan's server in Dallas. Really bad so we decided it was best to move to another host which is hostgator.com. I am currently uploading all the files to restore KeelyNet so if you find some weirdness like missing pics or missing files, could you please
email me with the specific location, filename or url?
Once I get it all done, I'll update the news in a day or two I 'spect.
I would appreciate it mucho! Thanks! - Jerry

10/04/09 - Magnetic Switch invention could 'change the world'
KeelyNet A light-bulb clicked, and inventor Larry Fullerton from New Hope, along with Correlated Magnets Research LLC, trademarked "MAGNIT," yes with an "I," technology. Mark Roberts, is the president of CMR. He said that everyone can and will most likely use this technology in their daily lives. "For example a door during the daytime, I have it with five pounds of force to where I can open and shut the door. At night I hit the lock on it, it's 400 pounds of force,"said Roberts. It's force that is formed through a unique coding made up of many small magnetic fields. "They're stronger than ordinary magnets, twice as strong," said Fullerton. The concept is complex in theory, but the end product should be user friendly. To put this in practical terms, regular magnets will stick together just about any way they touch, they can also be very dangerous. Programmable magnets will only stick together in one precise position, but they can be released with just a simple twist. Larry and Correlated Magnetics Research already have 60 patents filed. - Source. This has already been invented and detailed on KeelyNet, read about it at Vorktex vs patented Hildenbrand Magnetic Switch.

10/04/09 - Is a New Model Needed for Breakthrough Science?
Meeting today's biggest challenges--climate change and energy independence, for example--will take major scientific breakthroughs. To accomplish them, the nation needs research organizations that are far more mission-focused and collaborative than the current principal investigator (PI)–centered model of academic research. That's the opinion of physicist Eric Isaacs, the new director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. Only the government now has the ability to make that kind of investment in scientific excellence, Isaacs said in his talk, because today's "different conditions" make it "very difficult to reconstruct Bell Labs." But, he tells Science Careers, the Energy Department's national labs already incorporate elements of the model. Funded by the government and run by private entities such as universities or companies, they focus on particular problems and emphasize collaboration among scientists and engineers to find solutions. Researchers need not spend their time writing grant proposals or depend primarily on the cheap labor of aspiring scientists who will soon be looking to launch their own careers. Everyone is expected to perform at a high level, but no one endures a single, make-or-break tenure decision. Instead of success in running the independent, mom-and-pop operations so important at universities, a major element in evaluations is a scientist's ability to collaborate. - Source

10/04/09 - Cell Phone door/safe unlocker invention
KeelyNet A GRADE 11 pupil from Cambridge High School has invented a device that opens a safe from anywhere in the world – all through a cellphone. Yet to be named, the invention allows a call to a cellphone located inside a safe to open the door once it rings. Azharuddin Mohamed, 16, of Buffalo Flats, said the idea came after he heard an Amalinda man relating how he had to drive 50km to hand over the keys every time a client wanted to use his guesthouse. He said the conversation inspired him to find a solution. “I have even tested it from as far away as Cape Town, the UK and Hong Kong, and people were amazed,” he said. Azharuddin explained that the cellphone inside the safe was connected to an electrical circuit which triggered the solenoid (a current-carrying coil of wire) in the safe door, allowing it to open. The battery in the cellphone never dies because it works on an electric current. - Source

10/04/09 - What's next for X?
Five years after the first privately funded space plane won the $10 million Ansari X Prize, the spirit behind the contest has spread far beyond spaceflight. Have realities kept pace with the expectations sparked back in 2004? What are the next multimillion-dollar feats on the horizon? What Space Prizes are you excited about going forward? What would you recommend to NASA’s Centennial Challenges program? We’ve thought about space prizes along the following lines:

* Rapid point-to-point travel, say, New York to Paris in less than 60 minutes.
* An Orbital Debris X Prize, that is, a prize for the team able to target and remove a specific pieces of orbital debris.
* Asteroid rendezvous and mapping.
* Asteroid deflection – demonstrate the ability to deflect an asteroid in a precise and controlled fashion.

Perhaps my favorite space X PRIZE and the one that I’m spending the most time promoting is what I call a "Beamed Energy Propulsion X Prize." If you stop and think about it, the form of propulsion used today hasn’t changed in over 1,000 years - since the invention of fireworks by the Chinese. Basically, you burn (oxidize) a material in a tube, hot gases come out one end and the vehicle flies in the opposite direction. Sure, our rockets have gotten bigger and more efficient, but the basic design remains unchanged. - Source

10/04/09 - Hilarious SNL cut to the bone sketch about all of Obama's Failures
The do nothing president. "Saturday Night Live" opened its show with a particularly harsh send-up of President Obama last night. The critique focused on failed promises, as a checklist repeatedly appeared to the right of the screen that had "NOT DONE" checked off next to the following categories: global warming, immigration reform, gays in the military, limits on executive powers, torture prosecutions, closing Gitmo, withdrawing from Iraq, improving the status of the fight in Afghanistan, health care reform, etc. - Source

10/04/09 - New Touchless 3D Fingerprinting System
A new non-contact, 3-D fingerprinting system could make spotting the bad guys faster and easier, whether it’s at the border or the police precinct. By projecting patterns of light onto a finger and analyzing the image, researchers from the University of Kentucky are able to create a more accurate print than those made with ink or sensor plates. The researchers say the system is more efficient than traditional fingerprinting and significantly reduces the number of incorrect matches. Lines of light are projected on a finger to illuminate the print. The light is warped by the ridges and valleys of the fingertip, allowing researchers to generate a 3-D fingerprint. - Source

10/04/09 - Moving Windmills
In late 2006, a Malawian newspaper first wrote about a remarkable young man from a remote rural village north of the capital city. This is his story. A very inspiring clip that shows what persistence and dedication can do to change lives. / A self-taught hacker brought a little light to his tiny home. [William Kamkwamba] dropped out of school because his family lacked the $80 per year for tuition. At the age of 14 he read books from the library and gained the knowledge he needed to built a 12 watt wind generator from junk parts. Wow! We’re pretty used to hearing about creative people who end up getting punished for their hacks. Fortunately he has been rewarded for his brilliance. He’s now studying at the African Leadership Academy in Johannesburg with a well-deserved scholarship. His story comes to the surface now because a book about his experiences has just been released. We need more people like this, and they should be rewarded for their efforts like he has been. We’ve put the book on our hold list at our Public Library and can’t wait to gain some knowledge from [William's] experiences. ( via http://hackaday.com ) - Source

10/04/09 - Illegal Toxic Waste Can Be Spotted From Space
Today’s environmental detectives can use radar, helicopters and even satellite images to help them spot illegal toxic waste dumps and help catch those responsible. Ironically, the tightening of restrictions on waste disposal and the enforcement of new recycling laws have made illegal dumping more likely, turning it into big business for the criminals involved. - Source

10/04/09 - Eating Sweets Every Day In Childhood ‘Increases Adult Aggression’
KeelyNet A study of almost 17,500 participants in the 1970 British Cohort Study found that 10-year-olds who ate confectionary daily were significantly more likely to have been convicted for violence at age 34 years. Researchers from Cardiff University found that 69 per cent of the participants who were violent at the age of 34 had eaten sweets and chocolate nearly every day during childhood, compared to 42% who were non-violent. This link between confectionary consumption and violence remained after controlling for other factors. The researchers put forward several explanations for the link. Lead researcher Dr Simon Moore said: “Our favoured explanation is that giving children sweets and chocolate regularly may stop them learning how to wait to obtain something they want. Not being able to defer gratification may push them towards more impulsive behaviour, which is strongly associated with delinquency.” - Source

10/04/09 - Electric Car Nano-Batteries Aim For 500-Mile Range
"Consortium members read like a Who's Who in technology research for the Battery 500 Project which aims to use nanotechnology to extend the range of all-electric cars 200 miles beyond the 300-mile range of gasoline powered cars. IBM, the University of California at Berkeley and all five of our US National Labs are collaborating to make the 500-mile electric car battery. Within two years, they promise to have a new kind of battery technology in place for the 500-mile electric car. If that happens, then I predict a mass exodus from gasoline to electric powered cars that will make the Toyota Prius look like a fad." - Source

10/04/09 - Wireless Network Modded To See Through Walls
"The way radio signals vary in a wireless network can reveal the movement of people behind closed doors, say researchers who have developed a technique called variance-based radio tomographic imaging which processes wireless signals to peer through walls. They've tested the idea with a 34-node wireless network using the IEEE 802.15.4 wireless protocol (the personal area network protocol employed by home automation services such as ZigBee). The researchers say that such a network could be easily distributed by the police or military wanting to determine what's going on inside a building. But such a network, which uses cheap off-the-shelf components, might also be easily deployed by your neighbor or anybody else wanting to monitor movements in your home." / Basically, they blast Wi-Fi on one side and read the signals on the other side with multiple receivers. Moving bodies inside the room can be detected because they interfere slightly with the waves. - Source

10/04/09 - Coupon Fairies to help others save money
KeelyNet Is this a growing trend? Grocery Aisle Coupon Fairies. You reach for an item at your local grocery store, and notice that on the shelf next to it is a coupon thoughtfully left behind by another shopper. But wait, is this a thoughtful way to keep clipped coupons from going to waste? Or just a way for shoppers to feel good about themselves, but create more litter for grocery store employees to clean up? Somebody wrote about finding a $1 coupon for Dentastix: Some thoughtful shopper decided not to use a coupon he/she'd clipped, but left it for the next lucky shopper looking to buy. What a great thing to do instead of just throwing them out :) Have you ever found a coupon left by someone else? It's quite possible that this is the first time it's ever happened. - Source

10/04/09 - Coolest Robot yet!
This robot is called OmniZero.9. It smoked the competition this weekend at the 16th annual ROBO-ONE competition in Toyoma, Japan. It walks, rolls and carries. Watch the video! / There are so many biped bots circulating the web that we tend to overlook them. This one caught our eye this morning due to its interesting ability to change its layout. Named OmniZero.9, this biped can drive on 4 wheels like a car, walk like a biped, and even carry a person. While it certainly doesn’t look like the most comfortable mode of transportation, it looks less awkward than some of the latest “innovations” coming from big names. ( comment via http://hackaday.com ) - Source

10/04/09 - Corporations Now Have a Right To "Personal Privacy"
"Thanks to a recent ruling (PDF) by the US Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit, corporations now have a right to 'personal privacy,' due to the application of a carelessly worded definition in the Freedom of Information Act. FOIA exempts disclosure of certain records, but only if it 'could reasonably be expected to constitute an unwarranted invasion of personal privacy.' But in its definitions, FOIA makes the mistake of broadly defining 'person' to include legal entities, like corporations. The FCC didn't think that 'personal privacy' could apply to a corporation, so they ignored AT&T's claim that releasing data from an investigation into how AT&T was overcharging certain customers would violate the corporation's privacy. The Third Circuit thought that the FCC's actions were contrary to what the law actually says. So now the FCC has to jump through more hoops to show that releasing data on their investigation into AT&T's overcharging is 'warranted' within the meaning of 5 USC 552(b)(7)(c) before it can release anything." - Source

10/04/09 - Dissolvable Glass For Bone Repair
"Sticks and Stones May Break My Bones, but Glass Will Certainly Mend Them! The old schoolyard ditty may be changed to reflect developments using metallic glass that will dissolve in situ instead of the traditional stainless steel or titanium hardware, which require removal by surgery once the bone has healed. Physics World reports that researcher Jörg Löffler at ETH Zurich has created an alloy of 60% magnesium, 35% zinc, and 5% calcium, molded in the form of metallic glass. Through rapid cooling, the alloy forms a molecularly amorphous glass that slowly dissolves over time, supporting the injury long enough for healing, then slowly dissolving away." - Source

10/04/09 - Communicator Clothing
KeelyNet "The crew of the classic science-fiction show's Starship Enterprise wore small devices on their chests that they could tap to communicate instantly with their colleagues. Such communications technology is now closer to reality thanks to a Finnish company which this week demonstrated high-tech clothing that can send and receive messages via satellite. The demonstrator antenna, built by the Patria Aviation Oy company, looks like a simple patch of cloth but is capable of operating in the Iridium and GPS frequency band as part of clothing. The Iridium satellites allow two-way voice and data communication, while GPS provides positional data to the user. Iridium could also relay the position of the user." - Source

10/04/09 - Sony Prototype Sends Electricity Through the Air
"Sony announced Friday that it has developed a prototype power system based on magnetic resonance that can send 'a conventional 100 volt electricity supply over a distance of 50 centimeters to power a 22-inch LCD television.' Unfortunately, Sony's prototype wasted 1/5 of the power fed into it and additional losses 'occurred in circuitry connected to the secondary coil so the original 80 watts of power was cut by roughly a quarter to 60 watts once it had made its way through the system.'" - Source

10/04/09 - California Requests Stimulus Funding For Bullet Train
"Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger requested $4.7 billion in federal stimulus money Friday to help build an 800-mile bullet train system from San Diego to San Francisco. 'We're traveling on our trains at the same speed as 100 years ago,' the governor said. 'That is inexcusable. America must catch up.' Planners said the train would be able to travel from Los Angeles to San Francisco in two hours and 40 minutes, traveling at speeds of more than 200 miles per hour. About time! There comes a point when 'let's add another lane' is no longer a viable option!" - Source

10/04/09 - Biogas brings green revolution
KeelyNet Nepalese villager Khinu Darai used to have to walk about five kilometres (three miles) every day to collect firewood so she could cook meals for her family. Then two years ago, she bought a biogas plant under a government scheme to encourage villagers to convert to greener energy -- an event the 30-year-old mother of three says transformed her life. “Biogas is a blessing for my family. These days I don’t have to go into the jungle to collect wood,” she told AFP outside her simple mud-brick home in the southern village of Badrahani. “It is clean and safe, and we are healthier now as we are not breathing in smoke all the time.” In all, 82 households in Badrahani have bought biogas plants at heavily subsidised rates under the scheme, which is funded by the Dutch and German governments. Biogas is a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide produced by feeding cow dung, human waste and water into an airtight underground tank known as digester and allowing it to decompose. Environmentalists say biogas has huge potential in Nepal, where nearly 80 percent of the population of 27 million live in rural areas with no electricity, leaving them dependent on firewood for cooking and heating. This means they live in smoke-filled houses, causing respiratory problems, particularly for young children, while the destruction of forests is also a major cause for concern. BSP research and development officer Mahaboob Siddiki said it had not always proved easy to convert villagers. “Because the gas is produced from cow dung and human waste, villagers thought it was impure, and that it would be shameful to cook food using it,” said Siddiki, who has worked on the project since it began 26 years ago. “Several times, we were chased away from some of the villages, but we never gave up,” he said, calling the technology a “win-win situation” for villagers and the environment. It is a view shared by Bibhimaya Tamang, a 45-year-old farmer from Badrahani who uses slurry -- a by-product of biogas -- to fertilize her crops, giving her higher yields and more income from the vegetables the family grows. “Staying in a smoke-filled kitchen for hours was painful. It hurt my eyes and I used to cough a lot while cooking,” she told AFP. “Using biogas has been so much better.” - Source

10/04/09 - Did Chicago Lose Olympic Bid Due To US Passport Control?
"Yesterday, Chicago lost its bid for the 2016 Olympics (which went to Rio de Janiero instead), and it's looking very likely that US border procedures were one of the main factors which knocked Chicago out of the race: 'Among the toughest questions posed to the Chicago bid team this week in Copenhagen was one that raised the issue of what kind of welcome foreigners would get from airport officials when they arrived in this country to attend the Games. Syed Shahid Ali, an I.O.C. member from Pakistan, in the question-and-answer session following Chicago's official presentation, pointed out that entering the United States can be "a rather harrowing experience." ... The exchange underscores what tourism officials here have been saying for years about the sometimes rigorous entry process for foreigners, which they see as a deterrent to tourism.'" - Source

10/04/09 - Massive Texas wind farm operating
The world's largest wind farm officially got up and running Thursday, with all 627 towering wind turbines churning out electricity across 100,000 acres of West Texas farmland. The Roscoe Wind Complex, which began construction in 2007 and sprawls across four counties near Roscoe, is generating its full capacity of 781.5 megawatts, enough to power 230,000 homes, the German company E.ON Climate and Renewables North America said. "This is truly sign milestone for us," said Patrick Woodson, the company's chief development officer. "In three years to be able to take this project from cotton fields to the biggest wind farm in the world is something we're very proud of." The complex is about 220 miles west of Dallas and 300 miles south of the land where billionaire oilman T. Boone Pickens had planned an even larger wind farm before he scrapped the idea in July. Texas leads the nation in wind power production, and this wind farm tops the capacity record of 735.5 megawatts set by another West Texas farm southwest of Abilene. - Source

10/04/09 - 30 Dumb Inventions
KeelyNet The 20th century saw many astounding technological innovations. The automobile revolutionized the way people live and work, the internet changed the way people think about information, and the U.S. of A put a man on the moon. But some technological advances that came in the earlier part of the 20th centry weren't exactly meant for the history books. Because they were stupid. - Source

10/04/09 - Study pushes for 'net-zero' solar homes in Texas
Building all new homes with solar power so they can generate the same amount of energy they use would dramatically clean Texas skies and save billions of dollars in utility bills, an environmental group said in a report released Thursday. The Environment Texas Research and Policy Center's study concludes that "net-zero" homes would cut energy demand so much that seven otherwise necessary power plants would not have to be built and consumers would save more than $5 billion. The group estimated that the reduced annual emissions in the nation's leading greenhouse-gas producing state would be the equivalent to cutting the pollution of more than 3 million cars by 2030. Energy supply is a huge concern in Texas, which is growing so fast that an estimated 2.2 million single-family homes are expected to be built between 2010 and 2030. The study found huge energy savings if 10 percent more net-zero houses are built each year for the next decade, then by 2020 all new homes were built that way. There are only a handful of net-zero homes in Texas and thousands among the 40,000 U.S. Department of Energy research homes around the country. In Austin, where the goal is for all new homes to be net-zero capable by 2015, a 40-house net-zero development is under construction about 2 miles from downtown. The average house there is about 1,450 square feet with a price tag of about $270,000. - Source

10/04/09 - You Snooze, You Lose--Weight
Lose weight while you sleep? It sounds too good to be true—but recent research indicates that there is a connection between how much you weigh and the amount of shut-eye you get per night. A study in the May issue of Psychoneuroendocrinology found a significant disruption in nighttime ghrelin levels in chronic insomniacs. According to the study, this hormone imbalance leads insomniacs to experience an increase in appetite during the day, leading to weight gain over time. In addition to creating an imbalance in ghrelin and leptin, sleep deprivation causes levels of the stress hormone cortisol to rise, which increases cravings for high-carb, high-calorie “comfort foods.” Furthermore, the brain secretes growth hormone during the deep-sleep phase, helping the body convert fat to fuel. Without enough deep sleep, fat accumulates. Sleep expert Michael Breus, clinical director of the sleep division at Southwest Spine & Sports in Scottsdale, Ariz., says that there is no magic number of hours people should sleep but that the average adult needs about five 90-minute sleep cycles per night, so 7.5 hours seems optimal as a minimum. - Source

10/04/09 - Church for Men
KeelyNet You’ve become passive, and you’ve allowed women to become the breadwinners, says Bob Rauscher, a director at Chandler’s Cornerstone Christian Fellowship. So, he says, it’s time for men to “change the tide” and return to being the family leaders who God assigned them to be, and Cornerstone believes it has the way: Man Church. “This is not for wimps or wusses, this is for men that want it straight and are ready for battle to take back the culture and to protect their families from the lures and temptations that are taking men out of the home and are threatening families everyday,” according to Rauscher’s description in a church news release. No women allowed. No singing, organ music or long sermons. Just 15 minutes once a week in the early morning at Cornerstone where you’ll hear inspirational advice for men about issues like marriage, the workplace and being a father, Rauscher said. And there are coffee and doughnuts. - Source

10/04/09 - Egyptians Angry Over Virginity Faking Product
A leading Egyptian scholar has demanded that people caught importing a female virginity-faking device into the country should face the death penalty. Abdul Mouti Bayoumi said supplying the item was akin to spreading vice in society, a crime punishable by death in Islamic Sharia law. The device is said to release liquid imitating blood, allowing a female to feign virginity on her wedding night. There is a stigma about pre-marital sex in the ultra-conservative Arab societies. - Source

10/04/09 - Break the Banks
The Obama administration, which has spent much of the past year bailing out banks and protecting the markets, has done shockingly little to help the middle class that has borne the brunt of the financial meltdown. Two acts are particularly revealing. Trillions of dollars of taxpayer infusions—direct cash, loan guarantees, capital purchases, policies to keep banks' cost of capital at virtually zero—have kept the banks afloat. It is amazing that the administration didn't leverage these infusions to negotiate these two simple policies that would have made banking more sensible for the middle-class Americans whose tax dollars have bailed out the banks. Too many banks refuse to reform mortgages and refuse to lend to midsize companies yet simultaneously pursue the activities that do little to create jobs but do much to generate the type of paper profits that fueled the last bubble: proprietary trading, highly leveraged private-equity deals, and foreign investment. These activities are not the fuel for domestic job growth that federal dollars and guarantees should provide. They are also more likely to lead to significant losses that will once again require taxpayer intervention. - Source

10/04/09 - Could a Gravity Trick Speed Us to Mars?
KeelyNet A flight to the Red Planet currently takes at least six months, which is why we send robots—the trip is boring, fuel costs are astronomical, and cosmic radiation is nobody's friend. But NASA engineer Robert Adams has a solution: the two-burn maneuver, an all-but-forgotten secret of orbital mechanics that could cut travel time in half. Dreamed up in 1929 by Hermann Oberth, one of the fathers of rocket science, the technique relies on the simple fact that faster-moving objects have more energy than slower ones. So, let's say you're in a spaceship at a fueling station in Earth orbit, near the moon: First you thrust back toward the planet (burn number one), where the force of gravity accelerates the craft. Then you point yourself in the right direction and punch the rockets again (burn number two). The result? "More bang for the buck from my propellant," Adams says. - Source

10/04/09 - Paid to do nothing
The U.S. Postal Service, struggling with a massive deficit caused by plummeting mail volume, spends more than a million dollars each week to pay thousands of employees to sit in empty rooms and do nothing. It’s a practice called “standby time,” and it has existed for years — but postal employees say it was rarely used until this year. Now, postal officials say, the agency is averaging about 45,000 hours of standby time every week — the equivalent of having 1,125 full-time employees sitting idle, at a cost of more than $50 million per year. - Source

10/04/09 - Startup That Builds Biological Parts
Synthetic biology is the quest to systematically design and build novel organisms that perform useful functions, such as producing chemicals, using genetic-engineering tools. The field is often considered the next step beyond metabolic engineering because it aims to completely overhaul existing systems to create new functionality rather than improve an existing process with a number of genetic tweaks. "Think of it as rapid prototyping in biology--we make the part, test it, and then expand on it," says Reshma Shetty, one of the company's cofounders. "You can spend more time thinking about the design, rather than doing the grunt work of making DNA." A very simple project, such as assembling two pieces of DNA, might cost $100, with prices increasing from there. - Source

10/04/09 - Physicists Explain How Human Eyes Can Detect Quantum Effects
KeelyNet By greatly amplifying one photon from an entangled photon pair, physicists have theoretically shown that human eyes can be used as detectors to observe quantum effects. Usually, detecting quantum phenomena requires sensitive photon detectors or similar technology, keeping the quantum world far removed from our everyday experience. By showing that it’s possible to perform quantum optics experiments with human eyes as detectors, the physicists can bring quantum phenomena closer to the macroscopic level and to everyday life. - Source

10/04/09 - Could a pill give you back the muscles of your youth?
The U.S. and Danish researchers studied the ability of stem cells - 'master cells' that repair damaged tissue - to build muscle. They found that as we age, the chemical messages that tell the stem cells to get to work become weaker. As a result, the body takes longer to repair the damage. Their findings, reported in the journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, pave the way for a pill that magnifies the messages - and so strengthens muscles. The researchers worked on pieces of muscle cut from the thighs of young men, aged between 21 and 24, and older men aged between 68 and 74. After the samples were taken, the men had the leg that was being studied put in plaster to make the remaining muscle weaken. When the casts were taken off, the men exercised with weights to rebuild their muscles and more samples were removed. Before exercising, the young men had twice as many muscle-repairing stem cells as the older men. - Source

10/04/09 - Most Babies Born Today May Live Past 100
"I guess it's good news for individuals and a challenge for societies," said Dr. Kaare Christensen, an epidemiologist with the Danish Aging Research Center at the University of Southern Denmark, the study's lead author. "If this trajectory continues, half the babies will be 100 and I think that gives us a new perspective for how to plan your life, basically," he said. "If you're going to retire when you are 60 or 65, it looks quite different when your life expectancy is 75 or 80 than when it's 100." Christensen said that while the progress in life span during the first part of the 20th century came by reducing infant mortality, increases in longevity since then have come from improving life at older ages, and that will need to persist for the projection to hold up. Christensen said that the aging population will also likely be a more vibrant population, with a higher quality of life than people of that age now. "The good news is people will generally be functioning well -- it's more like they're postponing their aging process," he said. - Source

10/04/09 - Pee Power: Batteries That Run on Urine
Scientists have come up with a nickel-based electrode that can oxidize urea, the major component of animal urine, and create large amounts of cheap hydrogen that could be burned or used in fuel cells. "One cow can provide enough energy to supply hot water for 19 houses," said Gerardine Botte, a professor at Ohio University developing the technology. "Soldiers in the field could carry their own fuel." Because storing and releasing hydrogen requires high pressure, low temperatures and a lot of electricity, scientists have been searching for ways to more easily use it for energy. Now they hope that by attaching hydrogen to another element it will make it easier to store and transport. If the urine can be used in a car battery, scientists estimate that a urine-powered vehicle could possibly travel 90 miles per gallon. Scientists in Singapore developed a battery powered by urine in 2005, and urine-powered AA and AAA batteries are already being sold in Japan. - Source

10/02/09 - Bhaskara's Wheel - Interesting claim of replication
KeelyNet A typical application of gravity in a perpetual motion machine is Bhaskara's wheel, whose key idea is itself a recurring theme, often called the overbalanced wheel. The first documented perpetual motion machine was described by the Indian author Bhaskara in the 11th century. It was a wheel with containers of mercury around its rim. As the wheel turned, the mercury was supposed to move within the containers in such a way that the wheel would always be heavier on one side of the axle. / (The video could easily be faked by simple air blowing across the rim of the wheel, note there is no audio. And yet, the idea of an overbalanced wheel always intriques me and I think it has been done before. - JWD) - Source

10/01/09 - Using Aluminum Oxide Paint To Secure Wi-Fi
"The BBC reports on people using aluminum oxide in their paint to block Wi-Fi signals from leaving their home or business. Aluminum oxide resonates at the same frequency as Wi-Fi signals and other radio waves, blocking data from going outside a building. It's not a flawless solution, as it may also block AM/FM signals. You or your neighbors may be unwittingly using this already, as most pre-finished wood flooring uses aluminum oxide as a protective coating." - Source

10/01/09 - Hardware Hackers Create a Cheaper Bedazzler
KeelyNet "Hardware hacker extraordinaires Ladyada (Adafruit Industries) and Phil Torrone (of MAKE magazine) have just published an open source 'Homeland Security' project, a non-lethal LED-Based Incapacitator: THE BEDAZZLER. After attending a conference where the $1 million 'sea-sick flashlight' (THE DAZZLER) was demoed by Homeland Security, the duo decided to created an under-$250 version, and just released the source code, schematics and PCB files. The team also released a 5 minute video describing the 'official version' as well as how they created the 'open source hardware' version." - Source

10/01/09 - Auto-Detecting Malware? It's Possible
"If antivirus protectors could collect data from machines and users, including geographic location, social networking information, type of operating system, installed programs and configurations, 'it would enable them to quickly identify new malware strains without even looking at the code,' says Dr. Markus Jakobsson. In a recent article, he outlines some examples of how this could work. The bottom line is this: 'Let's ignore what the malware does on a machine, and instead look at how it moves between machines. That is much easier to assess. And the moment malware gives up what allows us to detect it, it also stops being a threat.'" - Source

10/01/09 - The Grand Unified Theory of Superman's Powers
KeelyNet Ryan North, of Dinosaur Comics fame, asked his friend Ben Tippett to write a scientific paper-style analysis of Superman's powers after listening to Tippett describe his unified theory of the Kryptonian's abilities. Tippett, trying to understand Superman's powers from a physics perspective, has posited that Superman doesn't have multiple superpowers, but one amazing ability: It is our opinion that all of Superman's recognized powers can be unified if His power is the ability to manipulate, from atomic to kilometer length scales, the inertia of His own and any matter with which He is in contact. - Source

10/01/09 - Solo hybrid drivers may lose carpool lane privileges
The days may be numbered for hybrid car owners who have enjoyed traveling solo in California's carpool lanes. The stickers granting that privilege to 85,000 hybrid owners are set to expire Jan. 1, 2011. There are proposals in Sacramento to extend the deadline, but they would exclude most of the vehicles that originally qualified for the program, such as the Toyota Prius, the Honda Civic hybrid and the original Honda Insight. - Source

10/01/09 - Secret of Oz offers fixes for the Economy
KeelyNet Debt-buster explains, 'No amount of 'stimulus' can pull us out of this hole'," said award-winning filmmaker, Bill Still. "It's the interest payments on the national debt that are sucking the life out of the economy." Still's newest film, "The Secret of Oz," will premier at the Louisville International Film Festival on Friday, Oct. 2, but is available for purchase right now at WND's SuperStore. "The numbers are staggering and inescapable," warned Still. "In 2009 the U.S. government will spend $700 billion on interest payments on the national debt – nearly 25 percent of the national budget. Compare that to $18 billion for the entire NASA budget. We are spending more on interest payments every year than we have spent totally on the war in Iraq. This system has got to go!" The solution, according to "The Secret of Oz," is no more national debt. How do we fix this? Amazingly, the film says that the fix for the economy is hidden in symbols embedded in one of the most beloved children's stories of all time, "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz." The yellow brick, the emerald city of Oz, even Dorothy's silver slippers (changed to ruby slippers for the movie version) were powerful symbols of author L. Frank Baum's belief that the voting electorate – not the big banks – should control the quantity of a nation's money. "Just look at history. The issue was just the same in the 1896 Presidential election as it is today," said Still. "'The Wizard of Oz' was written in 1900 after L. Frank Baum saw that the populist monetary reform movement was going to die. It was a desperate flare which Baum fired up into the dark night of history, hoping that someone in the future would pay attention to the greatest issue of their time – and ultimately ours – humankind's escape from the debt money system." Now, a little more than 100 years later, "The Secret of Oz" reemphasizes the overwhelming importance of the issue: "This system is literally the primary cause of most of the world's hunger, poverty, misery and disease." "The solution is not complicated," says Still. "We can fix the economy in a single year. The solution is nothing new or radical. It's been done time and time again throughout history. Abraham Lincoln did it to win the Civil War. Benjamin Franklin did it to pull Pennsylvania through the Revolution. This is the secret that's been hidden from us for 100 years. We just have to know about it." ( www.secretofOz.com ) - Source. Additional information From Silver to Ruby - "In L. Frank Baum's original novel, The Wonderful Wizard of OZ, Dorothy's shoes were silver, not ruby. However, when the MGM musical went into production, Hollywood had just begun using a process known as Technicolor. The filmmakers decided that silver wouldn't pop quite that well once the film went from black and white to color and thus, it was decided that Dorothy's slippers would become ruby."

10/07/09 - PhotoSketch Auto composits New Image from crude sketch and Photos
PhotoSketch is an internet-based program that can take a rough, labeled sketch and automagically turn it into a naff montage. According to authors, their software can take any rough sketch, with the shape of each element labeled with its name, find images corresponding to each drawn element, judge which are a better match to the shapes, and then seamlessly merge it all into one single image. PhotoSketch's blending algorithm analyzes each of these images, compares them with each other, and decides which are better for the blending process. It automatically traces and places them into a single photograph, matching the scene, and adding shadows. Of course, the results are less than perfect, but they are good enough... - Source

PhotoSketch: Internet Image Montage from tao chen on Vimeo.

10/07/09 - Green job subsidies will destroy far more jobs than they create
Proponents of the bill’s effort to reduce carbon emissions by imposing an enormously expensive cap-and-trade system are finding it a tough sell. The American people simply aren’t buying the idea that global warming is a dire crisis that justifies a blank-check response. Reality is just not cooperating with doom-and-gloom global warming predictions. No warming has occurred for the last decade. And now the recession has heightened concerns about the economy and jobs. As a result, proponents of the Waxman-Markey bill—currently being debated in the Senate—have changed their sales pitch. Rather than present this big energy tax as a costly but necessary step to save the planet, supporters now claim that it would be an economic boon, a green-job-generating machine. “Make no mistake: this is a jobs bill,” said President Obama as the bill neared a vote in the House last June. “It will make possible the creation of millions of new jobs.” A study by The Heritage Foundation estimates a loss of 1,145,000 jobs from the Waxman-Markey bill. These are net job losses, after any “new” green jobs are taken into account. The three analyses of the bill done by the federal government also predict net job losses. Real world experience bears this out. Governments that subsidize or mandate green jobs reap fewer overall jobs and a weaker economy. Green job advocates once touted Spain’s aggressive alternative energy policy as a model for America. But, today, Spain’s green-jobs bubble has burst. Unemployment there stands at 18 percent, nearly twice that of the United States. Gabriel Calzada, economics professor at Madrid’s King Juan Carlos University, estimates that each green job Spain creates prevents 2.2 other jobs from being created. The Danish think-tank CEPOS recently studied wind energy in Denmark, another oft-cited model for America. CEPOS found than each wind energy job there costs the government $90,000 to $140,000 annually—much more than the jobs pay. Nor are these jobs sustainable. Once the government handouts end, so do the jobs. The same lesson can be seen in the United States. California has led the states in pursuing a green jobs agenda. Environmentalists often cite it as a model for the rest of the nation. But California also stands out as having higher unemployment and energy costs and a weaker economy than nearly every other state. Waxman-Markey would take the nation down the same job-killing path. Some jobs would be destroyed entirely. Others would be outsourced to nations that don’t drink the cap-and-trade Kool-Aid. - Source

10/07/09 - Hoyt Fluid Power engine
KeelyNet The Engine creates a source of direct hydraulic pressure that can be stored and utilized to perform any engine-driven work. The Reciprotating Internal Combustion Engine from Hoyt Engine Alternative cleanly and economically produces hydraulic fluid power that can be stored or utilized to perform any traditionally engine-driven work, including powering heavy earthmoving equipment and the full range of road-going vehicles. A wide variety of fuel types can be accommodated in this intriguing, potentially disruptive engine technology designed as a tightly packaged free-piston (compression ignition) power unit that fully accommodates, complements, and enhances emerging Hydraulic Hybrid system designs, affording staggeringly high performance potential yet, when driven reasonably, yields fuel efficiencies equivalent to about 100 MPG in a full-sized passenger car or utility vehicle. - Source

10/07/09 - New soil tester to assess earth's health
A Tel Aviv University (TAU) invention, the Optical Soil Dipstick (OSD) designed by Eyal Ben-Dor will help scientists, urban planners and farmers understand the changing health of the soil, as well as its agricultural potential and other associated concerns. It could be used as a whistle-blower to catch polluters. "I was always attracted to drug development and diagnostics, which spurred the development of this OSD device," said Ben-Dor, geography professor at TAU. "It's like a diagnostic device that measures soil health. Through a small hole in the surface of the earth, we can assess what lies beneath it." As climate change alters our planet radically, Ben-Dor explains, this dipstick could instantly tell geographers what parts of the land are best, or worst, for farming, says a TAU release. / Ben-Dor said there’s currently no simple and inexpensive way to test for soil health in the field. Soil maps of individual states are only compiled every 10 or 20 years, and each one costs millions of dollars. One testing process even requires the use of a bulldozer that dredges up large tracts of land to be sampled and analyzed in a laboratory. Testing can be much simpler with the dipstick, a thin catheter-like device that is inserted into a small hole in the soil to give real-time, immediately accurate and reliable information on pollution and the all-round health of the soil, Ben-Dor said. The Optical Soil Dipstick, which is expected to cost about $10,000 per unit per application, is currently in the prototype stage. - Source

10/07/09 - Plastic power
KeelyNet Inside a converted textile mill in Lowell, Mass., Rick Hess unfurls a roll of brown plastic film attached to a small electric meter. "Three volts," he says, smiling. "And that's just from the light in this room. Imagine what this reads when we're outside." Hess, who runs solar upstart Konarka, is showing off Power Plastic, a new lightweight, flexible, and cheap material that converts indoor and outdoor light into electricity. Think of it as a solar panel that rolls up like camera film. "Soon you may not even need batteries," Hess says, holding a prototype of a portable device that will recharge your cellphone in an hour. "We can put this stuff anywhere." Lowell-based Konarka (named after a temple dedicated to a Hindu sun god) currently sells small amounts of its Power Plastic for use on outdoor umbrellas and tote bags that will recharge a cellphone whether you're on the go or on the beach. Konarka's film rolls off a converted printing press that used to belong to Polaroid. It prints a secret plastic ink onto rolls of thin film. As it absorbs light, the polymer ink emits electrons, producing electricity. In a few years, Hess says, Konarka will have perfected a translucent version of its product that could be built into the windows of skyscrapers, generating enough power to run whole buildings. Power Plastic, however, does have its drawbacks. So far it is not nearly as efficient or durable as traditional silicon panels. Konarka's cells convert about 6% of the light that hits them into electricity, whereas silicon solar panels typically are 16% to 20% efficient. Hess says Konarka hopes to double its efficiency within a few years. Power Plastic also doesn't last nearly as long - about five years as opposed to more than 30 with silicon panels. But Hess argues that it doesn't matter because his product will be cheap to replace. Barry Maranta, president of SkyShades, an Australian company that makes solar patio umbrellas and lightweight awnings for parking lots, says he plans to purchase a few hundred thousand square meters of Power Plastic this year. (It sells for $100 to $200 per square meter.) He hopes to put enough Power Plastic on parking lot canopies at Orlando International Airport to generate $150,000 of electricity a year, which translates into a 35% return on investment over a decade... - Source

10/07/09 - Seasonal Flu Shots Double Risk of Getting Swine Flu, Says New Study
"A Canadian study currently under peer review apparently suggests that individuals given seasonal flu shots are twice as likely to get swine flu. The 'perplexing' study has thrown influenza health plans into disarray, with Quebec, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Ontario and Nova Scotia all suspending seasonal flu shots for anyone under 65 years of age. The study appears to be confined to Canada; the US, Britain, and Australia have not reported the same problem, so some are suggesting that the research has 'study bias.' However, the research appears to be 'solid' according to Dr. Ethan Rubinstein, head of adult infectious diseases at the University of Manitoba. 'There are a large number of authors, all of them excellent and credible researchers. And the sample size is very large — 12 or 13 million people taken from the central reporting systems in three provinces.'' - Source

10/07/09 - RGB laser
KeelyNet Last month we had the pleasure of bringing you [FireMyLaser's] green laser spirograph. Just green is great for a while, but why not add red and blue for a full spectrum of color! [c4r0] steps in at this point to bring us his red green blue laser. He dug around inside Blu-ray players and DVD drives until he had a collection of lasers, refractors, and other filters that fit his needs. With some careful toothpick alignment and glue, his setup was complete. But then he went further by modified his galvo scanner to accept the RGB laser; requiring a custom circuit board and new software, both available on his site. The original is in Polish, but Google does a decent translation. Check after the jump for a video. - Source

10/07/09 - Tourists To ISS Two At a Time Starting In 2012
"The US firm Space Adventures said on Friday it will be able to send two space tourists into orbit at once from 2012 onwards, on Soyuz spacecraft. 'We have been working on this project for a number of years,' said Sergey Kostenko, the head of the company's office in Russia. Each Soyuz will carry two tourists and a professional astronaut. One of the tourists will have to pass a year-and-a-half training course as a flight engineer. Space Adventures has been authorized by the Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos to select and contract candidates for space tourist trips." - Source

10/07/09 - Dow Chemical Rolling Out Solar Shingles Next Year
KeelyNet Dow Chemical plans on selling solar shingles as early as next year. The solar version can be integrated with normal asphalt shingling and will be introduced in 2010, with a wider roll-out scheduled for 2011. "The shingle will use thin-film cells of copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS), a photovoltaic material that typically is more efficient at turning sunlight into electricity than traditional polysilicon cells. Dow is using CIGS cells that operate at higher than 10 percent efficiency, below the efficiencies for the top polysilicon cells -- but would cost 10 to 15 percent less on a per-watt basis." - Source

10/07/09 - 72% of Banks Say Their Employees Committed Fraud
"The financial crisis appears to be exacerbating fraud by bank employees: a new survey found that 72 percent of financial institutions say that in the last 12 months they have experienced a case of data theft by one of their workers. Meanwhile, most banks don't want to talk about the insider threat problem and remain in denial, says a former Wachovia Bank executive who handled insider fraud incidents at the bank and has co-authored a new book called Insidious — How Trusted Employees Steal Millions and Why It's So Hard for Banks to Stop Them that investigates several real-world insider fraud cases at banks." The article dispels one assumption that might commonly be made about such insider fraud: "Interestingly, it's not the stereotypical offshore or outsourced employee who's most risky to their organizations. Nearly 70 percent of financial institutions say their full-time employees are most likely to pose an insider fraud threat..." Technology workers placed third in the roster of the job categories most abused. - Source

10/07/09 - FBI Investigates Liberator of Court Records
"Federal court documents aren't free to the public, they cost $0.08/page through a system called PACER. During a period when the US Government Printing Office was trying out free access at a number of courthouses around the US, a 22-year-old programmer named Aaron Swartz installed a small PERL script at the 7th US Circuit Court of Appeals library in Chicago — a script that uploaded a public document every three seconds to Amazon's EC2 cloud computing service. Swartz then donated over 19 million documents to public.resource.org. That's when the FBI took interest in the programmer responsible for this effort and ran his name through government databases. How did he discover this? His FOIA was approved, of course, and he received the FBI's partially redacted report on himself. The public.resource.org database was later merged with that of the RECAP Firefox extension, which we discussed a couple of months back." - Source

10/07/09 - New Graphical Representation of the Periodic Table
KeelyNet "The great power of Mendeleev's periodic table was that it allowed him to predict the properties of undiscovered elements. But can this arrangement be improved? Two new envisionings of the periodic table attempt to do just that. The first uses a new graphical representation that shows the relative sizes of atoms as well as their groups and periods. The other uses the same kind of group theoretical approach that particle physicists developed to classify particles by their symmetries (abstract). That helped particle physicists predict the existence of new particles, but may have limited utility for chemists who seem to have discovered (or predicted) all of the elements they need already." (via slashdot.org) - Source

10/07/09 - TestPrepReview.com - Free Online Practice Tests
There are many resources that you can use as you begin the test preparation process. You will find much information about most tests completely free and online at official websites, containing test dates, the types of questions, how long the test will take, and most other questions concerning the details of the test. The internet also provides access to test study guides and free practice tests that will help you prepare as well. Here, you'll find a lot of resources and information about the test preparation process. Hopefully you'll learn the right methods of preparing for the test in your future. Most of your initial studying can come from free online test prep resources. - Source

10/07/09 - 50 Questions That Will Free Your Mind
KeelyNet These questions have no right or wrong answers. Because sometimes asking the right questions IS the answer. From I, Robot; "There have always been ghosts in the machine. Random segments of code, that have grouped together to form unexpected protocols. Unanticipated, these free radicals engender questions of free will, creativity, and even the nature of what we might call the soul. Why is it that when some robots are left in darkness, they will seek out the light? Why is it that when robots are stored in an empty space, they will group together, rather than stand alone? How do we explain this behavior? Random segments of code? Or is it something more? When does a perceptual schematic become consciousness? When does a difference engine become the search for truth? When does a personality simulation become the bitter mote... of a soul?"

Dr. Lanning's Hologram: Good to see you again, son.
Detective Del Spooner: Hello, doctor.
Dr. Lanning's Hologram: Everything that follows, is a result of what you see here.
Detective Del Spooner: What do I see here?
Dr. Lanning's Hologram: I'm sorry, my responses are limited. You must ask the right question. - Source

10/07/09 - Roman Coin Hoards Show More War Means Fewer Babies
Coins buried by anxious Italians in the first century B.C. can be used to track the ups and downs of the Roman population during periods of civil war and violence. In times of instability in the ancient world, people stashed their cash and if they got killed or displaced, they didn't come back for their Geld. Thus, large numbers of coin hoards are a good quantitative indicator of population decline, two researchers argue in in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science Monday. - Source

10/07/09 - New Nickel-Lithium Battery Has 'Ultrahigh'ť Energy Storage
Researchers have found a way to create a battery out of Nickel and Lithium that can store more than 3.5 times the energy of lithium-ion batteries and are much safer to boot. Your standard issue Li-ion battery can hold about 55 watt hours of energy per pound of battery. Today’s modern electric cars need about 25 kilowatt hours (kWh) of power to go 100 miles. As an example, The Tesla Roadster has a 53 kWh Li-ion battery pack and goes just a bit more than 200 miles on a full charge. Doing some calculations, you’ll find that the weight of a Li-ion battery quickly becomes the limiting factor in increasing the driving range of an electric car—you need roughly 500 pounds of Li-ion battery for every 100 miles or range, give or take. Taking the Roadster as an example again, its battery pack weighs about 1000 pounds—just a bit more than 1/3 of the entire car’s weight. Their experimental battery cell has already obtained a “practical energy density” of about 194 watt hours per pound of battery material. Imagine if that Tesla Roadster had 1000 pounds of Ni-Li batteries in it—that’s a 700 mile range. - Source

10/07/09 - Report questions value of handwashing to fight flu
A news article in Thursday's online issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal points to a Canadian report from 2007 that concluded there is no evidence that proper hand hygiene prevents transmission of flu viruses. Most acute respiratory diseases are caused by viruses, but since none of the studies tested for that, the studies do not offer any information about whether handwashing helps limit the spread of influenza in particular, the report's authors said. Current evidence suggests flu viruses are mainly transmitted at a short range of one to two metres by inhaling particles from someone who is infected. The virus can also survive on surfaces, and theoretically could be transmitted by contaminated hands and surfaces, according to the report. Handwashing recommendations are therefore based on practicality rather than evidence, says the report, which is based on the findings of a 13-member panel of experts chaired by Dr. Donald Low, microbiologist-in-chief at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. Low wasn't available for an interview on Thursday, but he told the journal that handwashing, "is a simple thing to do and it may protect you from some other illnesses." - Source

10/07/09 - There I Fixed It: A blog about hacking, poorly.
KeelyNet Thereifixedit.com is a site filled with dubious innovations. Some of them are cool, some of them are clever, and most of them are terrifying. Anyone who has ever stood in front of a broken household appliance with a roll of duct tape, one screw driver with a bit chipped off the flat part, and determination will laugh themselves silly browsing through this site. Maybe some of the ghetto hacks we covered before should be in this list. - Source

10/07/09 - Where Are All the Cool Robots?
"They are all around you, if you know where to look!" says Sean Brennan, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Penn State. When someone says "robots", we may think of the Terminator or the Iron Giant, Brennan explains, but in their most basic form, robots are simply computer-controlled devices that respond to commands and to the world around them. Take your car, for example, Brennan says. You might not think of it as a robot, but don’t underestimate its complexity. Modern vehicles have several hundred processors, each usually controlling some subsystem of the vehicle. Pressing the accelerator doesn’t direct more fuel to the engine; instead, it tells an engine control unit "robot" to give you more power. Performing calculations impossible for a human—accounting for engine conditions, exhaust status and incoming airflow, for example—the engine controller changes the fuel injection timing and spark timing to best meet your commands. They may not seem exotic, Brennan says, but look around and you’ll see dozens of examples of these "invisible" robots. The laser focusing system on DVD players and the automatic door opening systems in supermarkets—robots. Your car’s stock paint job and the parts in your iPhone? Manufactured by robots. And if you’ve flown recently, the fly-by-wire system used by your pilot is a kind of robot. Many researchers believe that programming meaningful intelligence into humanoid robots may be a reality within decades. When that time comes, will our android-assisted future be one of carefree ease as in The Jetsons or closer to the nightmare scenario of Blade Runner? - Source

10/07/09 - Thermoelectric Solar Power
KeelyNet [Colin] has put together an instructable for a solar power generator that uses the thermoelectric effect instead of the photovoltaic (PV) effect. We have seen Peltier devices used in cooling cans, solder paste, backs, and hacked hard drives. This is the first hack we have seen where a Peltier device is used to generate electricity from heat, essentially running the device backwards. The thermoelectric effect is the same principle that is used to generate electricity in radioisotope thermoelectric generators used in deep space probes such as Cassini. / How it works: This generation method uses a Peltier cell to generate electricity. Peltier cells are designed to be used as heat pumps. When you apply power to a Peltier cell, it begins pumping heat, and one side becomes cold and the other, hot. However, you can do the opposite and generate power from a temperature differential on the sides. To generate this differential, a Fresnel lense focuses light onto one side of the Peltier, and it becomes hot. The other side has a heatsink attached along with a fan that is powered by the Peltier. - Source

10/07/09 - Exploring a universe where nothing isn't empty
We appear to live in a universe where getting rid of all ordinary matter still leaves a fabric full of quantum fields and virtual particles—and getting rid of that turns out to be energetically unfavorable. What quantum mechanics has done, Wilczek suggested, is show us what sort of physics operates once you do the equivalent of taking the water away. What's left, in the case of our universe, is space that isn't really empty—instead, it's filled with quantum fields (notably the Higgs field) and virtual particles that pop briefly into existence before being annihilated by collisions with their antiparticle counterparts. The striking thing about this, in contrast to the multiverse, is that we actually have evidence for the existence of these vacuum fields and virtual particles. The clearest the authors described comes in the form of the Casimir effect, in which two plates are brought close to each other in a vacuum. Their proximity excludes the existence of some of the quantum fields in the space in between them, leaving that area, in effect, more empty than the vacuum outside the plates. The net result is a pressure that drives the plates together, and that force has been experimentally verified. That led to another key point: the vacuum that persists in empty areas of the universe is actually more energetically favorable than space that's devoid of Higgs fields and virtual particles. In short, if you somehow devised an experiment that could clear these things out, they'd spontaneously re-form. So, empty space isn't really empty as we might understand it, but it's a lot easier to have that stuff there than having space that was closer to our traditional conception of empty. - Source

10/07/09 - Halloween props: Low cost popup
[Backroads] has put together this nicely detailed writeup explaining how to make a low cost popup prop. He’s using a single pneumatic valve and a home made PVC piston to raise and lower a scary mask. He’s using an off-the-shelf 110v AC valve controller to control the valve. A flickering light, a “screamer” and a fog machine help fill out the project. The result is quite nice. We would be tempted to put a pressure sensor in front of it to optimize the scare timing. - Source

10/07/09 - What if the AI brain you create doesn't want to participate?
An audience member asked if Randal would give the emulated brains a choice about whether or not they wanted to participate in the experiments that had been created for, and he took the question very seriously. "Absolutely -- if you've got something that thinks like we do, what's the difference there." This immediately aroused the audience's attention. Just what is it we are talking about creating here. Another audience member asked a question about creating "copies" of our consciousness, and how, of course, each copy would be different, and Randal agreed. "Every copy of a brain will have its own set of self awareness, unless you believe there is something intrinsic about the biology." - Source

10/07/09 - Plasma Rocket Could Travel to Mars in 39 Days
KeelyNet Last Wednesday, the Ad Astra Rocket Company tested what is currently the most powerful plasma rocket in the world. As the Webster, Texas, company announced, the VASIMR VX-200 engine ran at 201 kilowatts in a vacuum chamber, passing the 200-kilowatt mark for the first time. The test also marks the first time that a small-scale prototype of the company's VASIMR (Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket) rocket engine has been demonstrated at full power. - Source

10/07/09 - Antioxidants make us more, not less, prone to diabetes
We've all heard about the damage that reactive oxygen species (ROS) - aka free radicals - can do to our bodies and the sales pitches for antioxidant vitamins, skin creams or "superfoods" that can stop them. In fact, there is considerable scientific evidence that chronic ROS production within cells can contribute to human diseases, including insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Tiganis said whether antioxidants are ultimately good for people will probably depend on their state of health or disease. "In the case of early type 2 diabetes and the development of insulin resistance, our studies suggest that antioxidants would be bad for you." Under some conditions, treatments designed to selectively increase ROS in muscle - if they can be devised - might even help, he says. It's not the first time studies have suggested that antioxidants can be a negative, Tiganis adds. Studies in worms have suggested that antioxidants can shorten lifespan, as have some epidemiological studies in humans. - Source

10/10/09 - Build a Hydrogen Fuel Cell in Your Kitchen
KeelyNet Scitoys has a great tutorial on how to build a working hydrogen fuel cell with objects from around the house. And the best part is, the whole thing will take you 10 minutes or so, which makes this a perfect project to do with your attention-span-lacking kids to introduce them to renewable energy concepts. Especially if there's a science fair or something coming up. Plus, it's a really great DIY illustration of how the cell works, if you're curious yourself. And who doesn't want a hydrogen fuel cell next to their fridge? What you'll need: From Scitoys

* A popsickle stick or similar small piece of wood or plastic.
* A 9 volt battery clip.
* A 9 volt battery.
* Some transparent sticky tape.
* A glass of water.
* A volt meter.
* One foot of platinum coated nickel wire, or pure platinum wire. - Source

10/10/09 - Round robot rolls out big things for CSU student
Greg Schroll's invention could impact everything from space exploration to search and rescue operations. As an undergraduate student at MIT, Schroll put together a spherical robot - a moving orb that's controlled remotely. It's been done before, but always with limitations. "They can't climb over large objects," Schroll said. "They can't climb steep inclines easily, [they are] incapacitated if they fall into a little ditch." Schroll literally overcame the obstacle by attaching a set of gyroscopes to store momentum. "Kind of like storing a running start, but you can do it while you're just standing still," he said. "It gives you this huge boost that you can basically use to climb over big obstacles or climb over big stairs." - Source

10/10/09 - New Invention Could Replace Polystyrene
Inventors with the Agricultural Resource Service, the chief scientific research agency for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, have discovered a way to turn common starches such as potatoes, wheat and corn into a polystyrene substitute. Polystyrene, also know as plastic #6, is used in products such as packing and construction materials, as well as disposable dinnerware. This new finding may offer a way to replace non-biodegradable polystyrene with a more eco-friendly alternative. Although the biodegradable foam is not waterproof, a corn-derived moisture barrier can be applied. Polystyrene, as a type of plastic, is one of many products derived from petroleum. However, the use of a biofoam, in place of plastic, would greatly reduce usage of petroleum. This polystyrene substitute is not the first bioplastic to be invented. The market is bursting with alternatives including polylactic acid (PLA), which is generated using corn instead of petroleum. Many of these substitutes can be commercially composted after use. - Source

10/10/09 - Tennessee engineers create hybrid ‘motor’
KeelyNet An invention developed by professors at Middle Tennessee State University and Tennessee Tech University doesn’t require Americans to replace their internal combustion powered vehicles. The Plug-in Hybrid Retrofit Kit would allow car owners to convert their regular autos to hybrid vehicles by retrofitting them with a small electrical system that disappears into the extra space between the brake structure and inside diameter of the rear wheels of most cars. It delivers an extra 10 to 20 horsepower per wheel, kicking in when critical momentum is achieved, giving a “coasting” effect that relieves fuel usage. “It gives you a virtual downgrade,” said inventor Charles Perry, a former IBM engineer who holds the Russell Chair of Manufacturing Excellence at MTSU. “The 15 horsepower that used to be provided by your engine is now provided by this.” MTSU professor Charles Perry’s Plug-in Hybrid Retrofit Kit is attached to a vehicle’s rear drum brake assembly and delivers 10 to 15 horsepower per wheel, allowing the driver to use less gasoline. - Source

10/10/09 - Declining Israeli education system is the real threat to their existence
The vast majority of Israeli citizens are inferior, in terms of scientific knowledge, to the citizens of South Korea, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan and Eastern Europe. We are rapidly approaching the current situation in developing countries, including our neighboring states. We are neither light unto the nations, nor beacon unto the Jews, nor candlelight unto Israelis; just nothing. All we have is darkness and plenty of groundless arrogance. For the young and skeptic among us it is worth mentioning that in June 1981, two days before the 10th Knesset elections, senior Likud politician Yaakov Meridor, who was considered a realistic candidate to succeed Prime Minister Begin, announced a revolutionary invention in the field of energy production: "23 kilocalories produce 17 thousand kilocalories. It's like taking a regular household light bulb and that bulb produces sufficient energy to illuminate an entire city like Ramat Gan.” Meridor said more: "Our invention is equal in importance to the invention of the wheel. The invention may make all the Arab oil wells unnecessary, and the Arabs will drink their oil if they like." Ignorance affects our chances of survival - In a country where only few people have heard about the law of conservation of energy, a ruthless charlatan like Meridor cannot only enter the Knesset, but also join the cabinet as minister of economy and determine the fate of Israel. Those who think that such a delusional story is extremely unlikely to reoccur should remember that in 1981, science studies were mandatory in Israeli high schools. Today the situation is much worse because in 2009, science is a luxury. In a country where most citizens do not know the difference between kilo calorie and kilo bandora, the number of charlatans and crooks will grow and all of them will enjoy increased income, fame and political strength. - Source

10/10/09 - Patent banks designed for N.J. inventors
To all those lonely-heart inventors out there looking for sugar daddies, the state has created an online dating service just for you. New Jersey has launched a web portal designed to bring patent-holders together with investors looking to make money off the next big thing. The service, dubbed a patent bank, is a searchable place inventors can upload information about their ideas that are available to be licensed. It can be found at www.nj.gov/patentbank. So far, the database mainly includes patents held through universities for products such as rehabilitation devices for ankles, medical treatment methods and specialized genes for asparagus plants. - Source

10/10/09 - Scientist’s oven makes fast-food healthier, faster
KeelyNet Kevin Keener, an associate professor of food science, displayed his radiant oven to the Purdue community Wednesday. Most fried foods from fast food restaurants have been fried once before they go to the restaurant and are fried again before they go to the customer. Keener’s Controlled Dynamic Radiant oven bypasses the need for a second frying. “I noticed the amounts of energy that go into frying something and made this to recreate the amounts of energy at different stages of frying,” Keener said. Using a radiant oven results in a 30-percent average reduction in oil. “When you have a large fry with 1,000 calories, that’s a significant amount of calories to be lost from fat,” Keener said. To skip frying, his invention uses tungsten halogen emitters (which look like really bright lights) to radiate energy into a food that passes through on a conveyer. There are 10 different heating zones that radiate different amounts of energy in the oven. Being able to control the amount of energy that goes into the food allows this oven to cook food faster than a fryer. “We can condense the cooking time of 3 and 1/2 minutes in a fryer to 1 and 1/2 minutes in the radiant oven,” Keener said. “Fast food could give on-demand cooking rather than giving the customer something that has been sitting for 40 minutes. It can be crispy and hot every time.” Kyle Fettig, a senior in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences, taste-tested two hash browns. One was cooked in the radiant oven and one was cooked in a conventional fryer. “The radiant oven hash brown is more crispy and has a better texture,” Fettig said. “I’d like to see it used around campus. If it can make a better hash brown, I’d like to see what else it could do.” - Source

10/10/09 - A ‘Vaccine’ for Cocaine
The vaccine itself does not destroy cocaine molecules, rather it induces antibodies that bind to it, making the opiate lose its ability to pass through the blood–brain barrier—and thus unable to trigger a high… - Source

10/10/09 - Ex-Staffers Winning Lucrative Defense Contracts
In the coming year’s military spending bill, members of a House panel continue to steer lucrative defense contracts to companies represented by their former staffers, who in turn steer generous campaign donations to those lawmakers, a new analysis has found. - Source

10/10/09 - Scientists Create Nanometric Butterfly Wings
KeelyNet A team of researchers from the State University of Pennsylvania (USA) and the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) have developed a technique to replicate biological structures, such as butterfly wings, on a nano scale. The resulting biomaterial could be used to make optically active structures, such as optical diffusers for solar panels. / (Or to make flying platforms... - JWD) - Source

10/10/09 - House cuts workweek to 2 1/2 days
The Democratic-led House -- in the middle of the biggest healthcare fight in a generation -- has now trimmed their workweek to just two and a half days, leaving members of Congress plenty of time to ski or play golf. House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) promised after the Democrats won the House in 2006 and then after Obama's election this year that the House would hold longer workweeks. But as the fall of 2009 wanes, the House has taken to starting on Tuesdays at 6:30 pm and adjourning "before the sun goes down" on Thursdays. But sometimes, they choose to work overtime: Since the House returned from recess on Sept. 8 of this year, it has stuck around to vote on a Friday just once. For what? Approving an a 5.8 percent increase in Congress' budget. - Source

10/10/09 - New Oklahoma law will publicy post details of women's abortions online
On Nov. 1, a law in Oklahoma will go into effect that will collect personal details about every single abortion performed in the state and post them on a public website. Implementing the measure will "cost $281,285 the first year and $256,285 each subsequent year." Here are the first eight questions that women will have to reveal, name and address is not required:

* Date of abortion
* County in which abortion performed
* Age of mother
* Marital status of mother (married, divorced, separated, widowed, or never married)
* Race of mother
* Years of education of mother (specify highest year completed)
* State or foreign country of residence of mother
* Total number of previous pregnancies of the mother: Live Births, Miscarriages, Induced Abortions - Source

10/10/09 - NASA Downgrades Asteroid-Earth Collision Risk
"NASA scientists have recalculated the path of a large asteroid known as Apophis and now say it has only a very slim chance of banging into Earth.. The Apophis asteroid is approximately the size of two-and-a-half football fields, and updated computational techniques and newly available data indicate the probability of an Earth encounter on April 13, 2036 for Apophis has dropped from one-in-45,000 to about four-in-a million, NASA stated." - Source

10/10/09 - eD, the electric DeLorean
KeelyNet Who wouldn’t want a DeLorean, honestly it has to be the one of the coolest cars around, what with its gull wing doors and stainless steel siding. Joking aside [Tom Neiland] and [Dave Delman] went even further, creating eD, the electric DeLorean. It contains around 910 pounds of deep cycle lead batteries, custom transmission adapter plate, and a WarP 9 DC motor controlled by a water cooled 2000 amp Z2K-HV, all together to produce 200 horsepower reaching over 85 miles per hour. The project cost ended up around $18,000 and they plan to add even more including a digital dash and Lithium batteries to extend the cars travel distance from the currently limited 30-40 miles on a single charge. Unfortunately the two couldn’t get their flux capacitor working, but we feel Dr. Brown would still be proud. - Source. (Note: this is NOT NEW, Carl Tilley used a Delorean in Tilley's experiments with a self-charging car which turned out to be fraudulent, but the car was battery powered. - JWD)

10/10/09 - Patent Claim Could Block Import of Toyota's Hybrid Cars
"Paice is a tiny Florida company that has patented a way to apply force to a car's wheels from an electric motor or internal combustion engine. Paice thinks that Toyota is infringing on its technology, and is going after the automaker in court. The legal spat became much more serious for Toyota this week, when the US International Trade Commission decided to investigate the matter. In the worst-case scenario for Toyota, the commission could ban the hybrid Camry, third-generation Prius, Lexus HS250h sedan and Lexus RX450h SUV." - Source

10/10/09 - 1 million FPS Slow Motion shows Beauty in Motion
This is not a hack. In fact it’s a promotional montage for a collection of scientific equipment that few of us could likely afford. But like yesterday’s giant marionettes over Berlin, sometimes even a costly and delicately-orchestrated achievement transcends its own not-a-hack-ness, fulfilling our brains’ lust for wonderment all the same. Kurzzeit of Germany produces ballistics measurement equipment. The video depicts various combinations of projectiles and targets at up to one million frames per second, revealing unexpected beauty in hitherto unseen phenomena, and is the best damn ten minutes you will waste on the internet all day! (via hackaday.com) - Source

10/10/09 - In-Game Advertising Makes Games Better?
Pretty much every time we hear about a game launching in-game advertising it sounds like a horrible idea that will only serve to detract from the experience. However JJ Richards of Massive wants you to give it a chance, claiming that if done correctly it can not only work, but actually enhance the overall experience. "In fact, according to Massive's research, gamers like ads. Here's the caveat: they have to add to the gaming experience. He describes a game that takes place in Times Square. With no ads, it's not real at all. With generic ads, it's a little better. 'Now imagine Times Square with ads you just saw on television or read in a newspaper—the latest movie release or television show or a new car model,' he said. 'Imagine further that it is up-to-the-minute, whether you played your game today or six months from now. That is much more realistic.' His argument is that gamers consume the experience of ads, not just the ads themselves. 'The ads add to and enhance that experience, and our research shows that it is highly effective for both game play as well as advertisers.'" - Source

10/10/09 - Muslims To Make Majority of Earth's Population in Near Future
KeelyNet Every fourth human being living on earth is a Muslim, a report from the department of religion of the US-based Pew Research Center said. There are 1 billion 570 million Muslims living in the world today, the research said. Brian Grim, a senior researcher at the think-tank said that the number was more than he originally expected. Up to 60 percent of Muslims live in Asia, 20 percent – in the Middle East and North Africa. The report also mentioned that over 300 million Muslims live in the countries where Islam is not the basic religion. In 2007, 45 percent of Americans considered Islam as a violence-inciting religion, although in 2009 the number reduced to 38 percent. In addition, the number of Americans familiar with peculiarities of Islam increased. The results of the poll showed that the number of Americans studying Islam has been growing steadily recently. The number of US citizens who consider Islam a source of violence has reduced considerably. - Source

10/10/09 - Brain Waves Surge Moments Before Death
A study of seven terminally ill patients found identical surges in brain activity moments before death, providing what may be physiological evidence of "out of body" experiences reported by people who survive near-death ordeals. Doctors at George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates recorded brain activity of people dying from critical illnesses, such as cancer or heart attacks. Moments before death, the patients experienced a burst in brain wave activity, with the spikes occurring at the same time before death and at comparable intensity and duration. At first, doctors thought the electrical surges picked up by electroencephalographs were caused by other machines or cell phones in the rooms of dying patients, lead author Lakhmir Chawla told Discovery News. The EECs were being used to monitor patients' level of consciousness as doctors and families wrestle with end-of-life issues. "We did it when patients want to withdraw life support, to make sure patients are comfortable, as we withdraw care," Chawla said. The medical staff kept seeing spikes in patients' brain waves just before death. "We thought 'Hey, that was odd. What was that?'" Chawla said. "We thought there was a cell phone or a machine on in the room that created this anomaly. But then we started removing things, turning off cell phones and machines, and we saw it was still happening." The doctors believe they are seeing the brain's neurons discharge as they lose oxygen from lack of blood pressure. "All the neurons are connected together and when they lose oxygen, their ability to maintain electrical potential goes away," Chawla said. "I think when people lose all their blood flow, their neurons all fire in very close proximity and you get a big domino effect. We think this could explain the spike." It's possible a cutoff of oxygen would trigger a similar but recoverable event that becomes seared into memory. "Not everyone reports this light sort of business. What you hear most often reported (in near-death experiences) is just a vivid memory," Chawla said. Brain researcher Kevin Nelson at the University of Kentucky, who studies near-death experiences, said it's well known that when the brain is abruptly deprived of blood flow it gives off a burst of high voltage energy. "It's unlikely with conventional brain wave recordings during death that they're going to see something that hasn't been seen already," Nelson said. - Source

10/10/09 - How dangerous could a hacked robot possibly be?
KeelyNet Researchers at the University of Washington think it's finally time to start paying some serious attention to the question of robot security. Not because they think robots are about to go all Terminator on us, but because the robots can already be used to spy on us and vandalize our homes. In a paper published Thursday the researchers took a close look at three test robots: the Erector Spykee, and WowWee's RoboSapien and Rovio. They found that security is pretty much an afterthought in the current crop of robotic devices. "We were shocked at how easy it was to actually compromise some of these robots," said Tadayoshi Kohno, a University of Washington assistant professor, who co-authored the paper. The researchers aren't so much worried about the scenario depicted in James Cameron's movie Terminator, where machines develop self-awareness and decide to wipe out humanity. They're afraid of a world where hackers can take control of the robots we've brought into our homes. Some of today's robots operate as wireless access points, and Kohno's team found that a nearby attacker could connect to someone else's robot quite easily. Robots such as the Rovio can also be controlled over the Internet, meaning that if a hacker could somehow sniff the victim's user name and password, he could turn the robot into a remote-controlled spy machine. "We think that consumers should at least be aware that there is the possibility that someone would listen in on their robot and take over their robot and have mobile eyes and ears in their home," said Tamara Denning a PhD student who also worked on the paper. "They're little computers." - Source

10/10/09 - 4 out of every 5 Mac users also own a Windows PC
There used to be something no self-respecting Mac owner would do: Admit to owning a Windows PC. Now, a whopping 85 percent of Mac owners 'fess up. Does it surprise anyone that Mac households also have larger incomes? While 36 percent of Mac owners report household incomes greater than $100,000, only 21 percent of total households make the same claim. So while today's Mac users may be a tad less devoted that those of years' past, they have more money and spend it on many more devices than average consumers. And that includes Windows PCs. - Source

10/10/09 - Nissan's new concept car 'feels like flying'
The "Land Glider", a tandem-ride ultra light-weight electric vehicle with a narrow body at the company's design center at Atsugi city in Kanagawa prefecture, suburban Tokyo. The car shifts its centre of gravity whilst turning by leaning like a motorcycle. The zero-emission electric "Land Glider" seats two people -- one in the front and one in the back. Just 1.1 metres (3.6 feet) wide, it can easily squeeze into tight parking spaces and through narrow streets. "In the past a car used to move only in a two dimensional way but the Land Glider can move in a three dimensional way," said Nissan's Ryusuke Hayashi, who is overseeing the project. "Although you are driving on the road, you feel as if you are flying," he said at a preview of the car. Inspired by motorbikes and glider aircraft, the four-wheel car has tilting wheels and moving fenders that enable it to lean by up to 17 degrees. Special sensors calculate the best tilt for negotiating a corner. Instead of a steering wheel, it has airplane-style controls. With a cocoon-like cabin and a body designed to look like it is protected with armour, the Land Glider also aims to give motorists a sense of security. - Source

10/10/09 - What costs $8,000 per gallon?
They allow you to make cyber material physical with a click of a button, but at times they like to get jammed with paper, run out of ink at the least opportune time, or possible just stop working altogether. The printer companies know of this love/hate relationship and at times they may exploit it. For instance, did you know that printer ink is $8000 per gallon? That makes the high cost of fuel or milk seem fairly trivial. Why is it so expensive? I wish I could say it was because it uses some rare trace element or requires special handling, but the real reason is because they can charge that much. That’s right! HP is a huge company and over 50% of their operating profits are from ink and toner for printers. Take a look at Kodak. They have broken away (a little) from the pack and decided to not gouge us AS MUCH. So instead of $20 per cartridge, they are selling their ink for $10 for black and $15 for color. Still expensive, but not AS expensive. The printer companies do say that you should only use their ink with their printers. I tend to think of this like the shampoo companies that say, “For best results, use with the SHAMpu brand conditioner.” It’s just another way to make more money, but the brand inks do tend to be thicker and of better quality than the third-party inks. Another wonderful idea printer companies have come up with is setting expiration dates on their inks that will either stop the printer from using that ink on a certain date or make a huge fuss about the expiration date passing. Supposedly this is because the printer companies cannot guarantee the quality of ink after a certain shelf life, so instead of telling you that, they can just make that cartridge unusable now. Why? So you have to go buy more ink, of course! - Source

10/10/09 - Researchers Develop a Penny-Sized Nuclear Battery
KeelyNet Researchers have begun developing a tiny nuclear battery the size of a penny that could provide power in a smaller, lighter, and more efficient package. Most people probably think of nuclear power that involves fission and the splitting of atoms. But nuclear power can also come from the natural radioactive decay of isotopes such as plutonium-238 -- a much gentler process that has powered nuclear generators aboard spacecraft such as NASA's Cassini probe. "The radioisotope battery can provide power density that is six orders of magnitude higher than chemical batteries," said Jae Kwon, an electrical and computer engineer at the University of Missouri. Kwon and colleagues want to miniaturize such batteries to power micro-devices and nanotech systems. The batteries won't pose any fission-related threats, but engineers do face a challenge in preventing the radioactive decay from damaging sensitive parts of the batteries. "The critical part of using a radioactive battery is that when you harvest the energy, part of the radiation energy can damage the lattice structure of the solid semiconductor," Kwon noted. The researchers hope to get around that problem by using a liquid semiconductor rather than a solid semiconductor. Eventually they also want to boost battery power, shrink its size, and eventually end up with a battery thinner than a human hair. - Source

10/10/09 - Hyperdrive Propulsion Could See LHC Test
The influential German mathematician David Hilbert first proposed an interesting side-effect to Albert Einstein's theory of relativity in 1924. In a book entitled “The Foundation of Physics,” Hilbert analyzed in great detail the interactions of a relativistic particle, as it was moving towards or away from a stationary mass. He determined that, to the inertial, distant observer, a particle traveling at more than half the speed of light would appear to be repelled by the stationary mass. US-based physicist Franklin Felber says that this idea has more or less been forgotten since, but adds that it could still do wonders. Felber has also performed calculations of his own, showing that, if Hilbert's theory is true, then relativistic particles should also repel stationary masses under the same conditions. This allows the particles to essentially deliver a specific impulse that is greater than its specific momentum, which means that it basically achieves speeds greater than the driving particle's speed. He says that this “hypervelocity propulsion” principle is similar to observations made on the elastic collisions of a heavy mass with a much lighter, stationary mass. The latter moves away at two times the former's speed. By placing a test mass next to a high-energy particle beam inside the LHC, and using resonant test mass, Felber believes that the largest particle accelerator in the world could determine whether his ideas are false or correct. - Source

10/10/09 - Physicists Measure Elusive 'Persistent Current' That Flows Forever
KeelyNet Physicists at Yale University have made the first definitive measurements of "persistent current," a small but perpetual electric current that flows naturally through tiny rings of metal wire even without an external power source. The team used nanoscale cantilevers, an entirely novel approach, to indirectly measure the current through changes in the magnetic force it produces as it flows through the ring. “They’re essentially little floppy diving boards with the rings sitting on top,” said team leader Jack Harris, associate professor of physics and applied physics at Yale. The findings appear in the October 9 issue of Science. The counterintuitive current is the result of a quantum mechanical effect that influences how electrons travel through metals, and arises from the same kind of motion that allows the electrons inside an atom to orbit the nucleus forever. “These are ordinary, non-superconducting metal rings, which we typically think of as resistors,” Harris said. “Yet these currents will flow forever, even in the absence of an applied voltage.” - Source

10/10/09 - Belief in the supernatural and the occult rising as atheism replaces religion
Logic demands that as society hurtles away from widespread religious practice and moves towards a more scientific, sceptical belief system, the tradition of the ghost story is skating close to death. Superstition should be replaced by cold, hard facts. However, UQ philosophy lecturer and atheist William Grey says the exact opposite appears to be true (and no, he doesn't believe in ghosts). Are we are turning into a bunch of scaredy cats? Maybe. - Source

10/10/09 - Underground City Envisioned in Nevada
KeelyNet "In Frank Herbert's famous 1965 novel Dune, he describes a planet that has undergone nearly complete desertification. Dune has been called the "first planetary ecology novel" and forecasts a dystopian world without water. The few remaining inhabitants have secluded themselves from their harsh environment in what could be called subterranean oasises. Far from idyllic, these havens, known as sietch, are essentially underground water storage banks. Water is wealth in this alternate reality. It is preciously conserved, rationed with strict authority, and secretly hidden and protected," according to the Sietch Nevada project description. "Sietch Nevada projects waterbanking as the fundamental factor in future urban infrastructure in the American Southwest. Sietch Nevada is an urban prototype that makes the storage, use, and collection of water essential to the form and performance of urban life. Inverting the stereotypical Southwest urban patterns of dispersed programs open to the sky, the Sietch is a dense, underground community. A network of storage canals is covered with undulating residential and commercial structures." These underground storage canals may replace the rivers losing water due to climate change in the Western United States. - Source

10/10/09 - US, other nations stop counting pandemic flu cases
Government doctors stopped counting swine flu cases in July, when they estimated more than 1 million were infected in this country. The number of deaths has been sitting at more than 600 since early September. Health officials had previously counted lab-confirmed cases, though the tally was skewed because many people who got sick never were tested. Other nations have stopped relying on lab-confirmed cases, too, and health officials say the current monitoring system is adequate. But not having specific, accurate counts of swine flu means the government doesn't have a clear picture of how hard the infection is hitting some groups of people, said Andrew Pekosz, a flu expert at Johns Hopkins University. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is relying on a patchwork system of gathering death and hospitalization numbers. Some states are reporting lab-confirmed cases. Others report illnesses that could be the new swine flu, seasonal flu or some other respiratory disease. Some say that's a more sensible approach than only counting lab-confirmed cases. Many people who got sick never get tested, so the tally of swine flu cases was off almost from the very beginning, they say. "It was a vast underestimate," said Dr. Zack Moore, a respiratory disease expert for the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services. - Source

10/10/09 - Uh-oh, here comes another Safety Measure
KeelyNet Terrorists invented a new way of blowing people up bypassing all security cordons. Suicide bombers no longer use belts with explosives, but instead hide them in their own bodies, more specifically, shove them into their rectums. Al Qaeda leaders were bragging about the new experiment in a video address released in the beginning of September, soon after the terrorist attack in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In the video, 23-year old Abdullah bin Hassan bin Taleh Assiri showed a metal cylinder filled with explosives and a detonator saying he would soon blow it up. If this know-how is widely used, airline passengers will be the first people to be threatened. Only an X-ray can detect an explosive in the rectum. However, not every airport can provide such X-rays. Besides, frequent X-rays can be very harmful for the health of frequent flyers. There is a way out. We have to be prepared that soon another safety measure will be added to airport metal detectors, emptying pockets, and removing belts and shoes. Passengers will be checked by special scanners with millimeter-wave that are safe in terms of radiation, but capable of detecting foreign objects in human body. “Why terrorists decided to transport explosives in their rectums versus stomachs? I think it’s because the stomach has a very aggressive acidic environment that can ruin explosives. As for weight, up to one kilogram of plastic explosives can be placed in the rectum,” surgeon Sergey Goryachev said. “The explosive yield of one kilogram of plastic explosives is 20-25 percent higher. If, for example, a terrorist will lean his butt against an airplane wall, it can blow up and cause depressurization of the aircraft. A catastrophe will be inevitable. Terrorists believe that in a crowd “rectum explosion” is not very effective. It can kill one or two people close to a suicide bomber and badly injure and burn three or four people, who would survive. But if plastic explosives are filled with cut nails, screws and other metal components, the effect will be different. A terrorist’s butt will “spit out” the metal fragments in a 30 to 40 degree area and will injure many people,” bomb technician Andrey Semipalov said. - Source

10/10/09 - Obama orders feds to cut energy use, emissions
Barack Obama on Monday ordered the federal government -- the nation's largest energy user -- to cut its greenhouse gas emissions and to reduce its impact on the environment. The president's executive order also requires all agencies to conserve water, reduce waste and use the government's enormous purchasing power to buy more environmentally sound products. Once the changes in place, they could touch everything from the kinds of vehicles in federal fleets to the use of recycled paper and non-plastic utensils in government cafeterias. Obama's edict is the first time a president is requiring the federal agencies to reduce their overall greenhouse gas emissions. In January 2007 , then-President George W. Bush signed a similar executive order that required the government to improve energy efficiency, but he didn't require greenhouse gas-reduction targets. Monday's order came a little more than two months before an international negotiating session on a new global plan to reduce emissions of heat-trapping gases. - Source

10/14/09 - 'Imagineer' touts geothermal energy invention
KeelyNet Alaskan entrepreneur Bernie Karl has pioneered modern technology to tap into one of Earth's oldest energy resources: hot water. Using imagination to fuel his engineering ambitions, this tenacious thinker and self-starter has figured out a way to generate electricity using water that's the temperature of a cup of coffee -- about 165 degrees Fahrenheit. After acquiring the 400-acre resort, Karl began trapping water from the underground hot springs, which produce enough power to heat the facility's greenhouses year-round. Most recently, Karl has turned his invention into a separate business by contracting with Peppermill hotel and casino in Reno, Nevada, to build a similar system there. His portable geothermal generator units cost from $350,000 to $375,000, each with the potential to generate enough power for 250 average American homes per year. 'Hot taps' - His energy-generating machine lies on a flatbed truck and can be hooked up to oil and gas wells or other heat-emitting sources to generate electricity. Karl adds a branch connection to an oil or gas pipeline, and the process begins when he "hot taps" into waste water coming through the pipes. The hot water enters the tubes of an evaporator encased in a common refrigerant found in many air conditioning systems. As the hot water passes through the evaporator, it begins to boil the refrigerant in the casing surrounding the tubes. The heat given off by the boiling refrigerant then causes an attached turbine to spin, which jump-starts a generator, producing electrical power. Next, cooling water enters from another source, recondensing the vapor refrigerant into a liquid. A pump pushes the liquid refrigerant back to the evaporator, so the cycle can start again. The difference in temperatures drives the entire "binary system." This setup works exactly the opposite of a refrigerator. "Oil companies don't drill wells for water, but they have some 5,000 kilowatts of geothermal power at their disposal in unused oil wells. Let's pick the low-hanging fruit and use the wells we have for oil for geothermal power," he said. Citing a 2007 Massachusetts Institute of Technology study, Karl said harnessing just 2 percent of Earth's internal energy could provide 2,000 times more energy than the entire planet currently consumes -- all free of polluting greenhouse gas emissions. "Everything goes back, there is no pollution, no smokestack," he said. "We are going to go recycle oil wells and recycle water and put it back in the ground." In a 2007 study, professors at MIT found that mining the huge amounts of heat that reside as stored thermal energy in the Earth's hard rock crust could supply a substantial portion of the electricity the United States will need in the future, probably at competitive prices and with minimal environmental impact. "... if we just drill deep enough, most of the U.S. can be transformed into a huge geothermal power zone while drastically reducing the nation's carbon footprint," the MIT report said. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Energy crisis is postponed as new gas rescues the world
KeelyNet The World Gas Conference in Buenos Aires last week was one of those events that shatter assumptions. Advances in technology for extracting gas from shale and methane beds have quickened dramatically, altering the global balance of energy faster than almost anybody expected. Tony Hayward, BP's chief executive, said proven natural gas reserves around the world have risen to 1.2 trillion barrels of oil equivalent, enough for 60 years' supply – and rising fast. "There has been a revolution in the gas fields of North America. Reserve estimates are rising sharply as technology unlocks unconventional resources," he said. This is almost unknown to the public, despite the efforts of Nick Grealy at "No Hot Air" who has been arguing for some time that Britain's shale reserves could replace declining North Sea output. Rune Bjornson from Norway's StatoilHydro said exploitable reserves are much greater than supposed just three years ago and may meet global gas needs for generations. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Einstein's theory of General Relativity may have been flawed
Now available in an online physics paper archive, the analysis by Cornell cosmologist Rachel Bean looks at how galaxies attract one another roughly one billion light-years away. Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, suggests that gravity should attract light just as strongly as it attract other matter, but the Hubble Space Telescope’s "COSMOS survey" data suggest gravity attracts light less than it does stars in the survey data. "The straightforward interpretation of the result is that something is wrong with General Relativity - space is not getting curved as much as time is." The analysis statistically finds only a 2% chance of its gravitational anomaly being wrong, but Bean cautions that, "more work needs to be done to see if this is real." Light bending less than galaxies under gravity's pull would offer a first real hint about the mysterious "dark energy" pulling galaxies apart at an accelerating rate, say both Bean and Carroll. First observed in 1998 measures of exploding stars, dark energy continues to confuse cosmologists, who expected to find gravity only pulling galaxies towards one another, not apart at an increasing rate. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Visualizing RFID - The Ghost in the Field
A video on Warren Ellis's blog introduces a new way to visualize RFID fields. The film is by Timo Arnall and Jack Schulze. The subject is introduced in words on the BERG site (a design consultancy); the tech behind it is explored at Touch, a project that experiments with near-field communications. "This image is a photographic mapping of the readable volume of a radio field from an RFID reader. The black component in the image is an RFID reader... The camera has been fixed in its position and the reader photographed. Using a tag connected to an LED we paint in the edges of the readable volume with a long exposure and animate them to show the form." - Full Article Source

Immaterials: the ghost in the field from timo on Vimeo.

10/14/09 - George DelaWarrs 3D field mapping for Radionics Analysis
KeelyNet With reference to the above article about visualizing RFID, I've seen photos of sound waves taken with a mechanical arm that swings up and down as it moves slowly across a horizontal track...thus scanning an X, Y grid. On the end of this arm, was a small microphone with a lightbulb that came on and changed intensity according to the sound it picked up at that spatial location. A camera with an open shutter was used to combine all the flashing lights in the dark room onto a single photo...its an incredible book about mapping sound, so this technology is not new and its just a matter of scanning to build an image of the invisible fields. George Delawarr of radionics fame scanned fields around many objects but in three dimensions which significantly increase the data points yet gives a 3D image. - JWD - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - OLPC pedal power
KeelyNet A One Laptop Per Child group out of Afghanistan have come up with a way to power the XO using pedals. The system interfaces a set of pedals with the Freeplay hand-crank charger, freeing up both hands for typing. Although not as compact, using both legs makes power generation much easier. Apparently a child as young as 3rd grade is able to pedal this well enough to power the computer in real time. We just hope this contraption is used for learning and betterment, and not in a pedal-for-porn scenario. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Ad-Aware 8.1 Speeds Up Scans, Improves Feature Set
Windows only: Just last week popular antivirus utility AVG updated to a new version; today the similarly popular adware-removal tool Ad-Aware sees its own update to Ad-Aware 8.1, featuring faster scans, improved design, and different modes to fit your needs. Ad-Aware is one of those tools that's gained a lot of popularity through its free version, which—unlike the $27 or $40 paid version—doesn't include all of the app's features, but it does the same basic adware scanning it's always done, only faster. For example, CNET reports quick scans that completed in about 3 minutes where the old version would take 10. If you were to pony up cash for the paid versions, you'd also get antivirus protection, a new behavior-based detection engine that learns what you don't deem a threat, and a real-time registry monitor. If all you're interested in, however, is running a basic adware scan, Ad-Aware Free has always and still is a good tool for the job. Ad-Aware is available for Windows only, comes in free and paid versions. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Wi-Fi Sees Through Walls DIY Home Edition
Joey Wilson and Neal Patwari of the University of Utah describe and demonstrate their through-wall wireless network tracking system. Joey enters a home surrounded by simple radio devices. He does not carry any kind of electronic device on his body, nor are any devices deployed inside the home, and the system is able to estimate his location. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Gadget and Gear Deals of the Day
Cheap monitors, discounted GPS devices, and HDTVs galore fill today's deal roundup. You're only here for the freebies? Fair enough, we also have free classical music and pregnancy tests. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - EPA To Reuse Toxic Sites For Renewable Energy
"The Daily Climate reports that President Obama and Congress are pushing to identify thousands of contaminated landfills and abandoned mines — 'brownfields' that could be repurposed to house wind farms, solar arrays, and geothermal power plants. Using already disturbed lands would help avoid conflicts between renewable energy developers and environmental groups concerned about impacts to wildlife habitat. 'In the next decade there's going to be a lot of renewable energy built, and all that has to go somewhere,' said Jessica Goad, an energy and climate change policy fellow for The Wilderness Society. 'We don't want to see these industrial facilities placed on land that's pristine. We love the idea of brownfields for renewable energy development because it relieves the (development) pressure on undisturbed places. The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory have identified nearly 4,100 contaminated sites deemed economically suitable for wind and solar power development, as well as biomass. Included are 5 million acres suitable for photovoltaic or concentrated solar power development, and 500,000 acres for wind power. These sites, if fully developed, have the potential to produce 950,000 megawatts — more than the country's total power needs in 2007, according to EPA data." - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - DIY Dyson vac hack
KeelyNet [James Dyson] may have built eleventy billion prototypes to perfect his famous cyclonic vacuum, but sometimes just one will do the trick. A cyclonic separator is used in workshops to keep larger cruft out of the dust collection system. The airflow inside a separator creates a vortex that flings heavier bits and particles to the periphery of the chamber, where they settle out the bottom, while relatively clean air escapes the vacuum port at the top. This makes for fewer filter changes and a more consistent pull from the vacuum. You can go buy a fancy professionally-made separator, but [neorazz] shows how to create one from an assemblage of PVC fittings and a five gallon bucket. The design may lack the power and slick design of the big units, but for garage hack use this may be all you ever need. They demonstrate it to be about 95% effective, and it’s very simple to make. A prior cyclonic separator hack appeared a bit more work-intensive, but the principle is all the same. It all comes down to what skills you possess and what parts you have on hand. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - High-Temp Superconductors To Connect Power Grids
"Somewhere in a triangle between Roswell (UFO) NM, Albuquerque (Left Turn) NM, and Amarillo (Do you know the way?) TX, a 22.5 square mile triangle of High Temperature Superconductor pipeline is to be built. Each leg of the triangle can carry 5GW of electricity. The purpose to load-balance and sell electricity between America's three power grids. Previously the Eastern Grid, Western Grid and Texan Grid have been separate, preventing cheap electricity being sold from one end of America to the other. The Tres Amiga Superstation, as it is to be called, will finally connect the three grids. The superstation is also designed to link renewable solar and wind power in the grids, and is to use HTS wire from American Superconductor. Some 23 years after its invention, today HTS comes of age. " - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - George Soros pledges $1bn to search for clean energy
Billionaire financier and philanthropist George Soros has pledged to invest more than $1bn (Ł625m) of his own money in clean energy technology to tackle climate change. Speaking in Copenhagen on Saturday evening, the Hungarian-born Soros also announced the foundation of the Climate Policy Initiative, which he will fund with $10m annually for the next decade. "I will look for profitable opportunities, but I will also insist that the investments make a real contribution to solving the problem of climate change." - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Cheap and easy top-down camera quadpod for Scanning
KeelyNet We keep waiting for evolution to give us that third arm but in the mean time, this may be the solution for holding the camera while you document your projects. [DHagen] has made a four legged tripod (quadpod) for his camera in order to use it as a digital copy machine. We’ve spent many a night trying to get a steady and sharp video of an LCD or array of LEDs in action to document our weekend tinkering and this will make that all a lot easier. His build uses materials that will total between $10-$20 at the hardware store down the street. A chunk of scrap wood is connected to the camera using a bolt in the threaded tripod hole of the camera. Two L-brackets are attached to the wood so that one is on either side of the camera lens. This leaves two mounting holes on either side of the lens to attach threaded rod using nuts. The assembly is capped off with a square of acrylic (plexiglas). Quick and clean. It’s not the cheapest camera mounting solution we’ve seen, but it sure does a good job. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - US court says software is owned, not licensed
Software company Autodesk has failed in its bid to prevent the second-hand sale of its software. After a long-running legal battle, it has not been able to convince a court that its software is merely licensed and not sold. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Buying green can be license for bad behaviour
Just being around green products can make us behave more altruistically, a new study to be published in a forthcoming issue of Psychological Science has found. But buying those same products can have the opposite effect. Researchers found that buying green can lead people into less altruistic behaviour, and even make them more likely to steal and lie than after buying conventional products. Buying products that claim to be made with low environmental impact can set up “moral credentials” in people’s minds that give license to selfish or questionable behavior. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Drink Coasters Can Test for Date-Rape Drugs
KeelyNet Drink coasters at several North Texas bars can test for substances such as GHB and ketamine. One of the coasters played a role in the arrest of a reserve Dallas police officer who is accused of spiking women's drinks at a Greenville Avenue bar. "It tells you that there is something foreign in that drink that shouldn't be there," said Dennis Burns of Drink Safe Texas, which makes them. Testing a drink is simple. The coaster has colored dots on the corners that change color if the drink is spiked. "And you can do that with your finger in the drink or the straw," Burns said. The Sugar Shack now uses the coasters. Establishments that offer them have a sign on the door to let people who might try to spike drinks know that there's a better chance they'll be caught. "We want our customers to feel safe when they go out to drink," Ludwig said. "We want them to feel like it's secure and safe in our establishment." The coasters cut into profits by about 40 cents each, but Ludwig said they are worth it. Drink Safe Texas also sells caps you can carry in your pocket to cover a beer bottle when it's unattended, as well as pocketsize drink testers such as the coasters that can be carried in a purse. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - AIDS vaccine results questioned - only 31% reduction
U.S. Army and Thai researchers announced to great fanfare last month that a combination vaccine had produced a statistically significant 31% reduction in new HIV infections in a trial of more than 18,000 people in Thailand -- a modest rate, but the first vaccine results that suggested it may eventually be possible to produce a vaccine against the deadly infection, which has killed more than 25 million people worldwide. In an unusual approach, the researchers decided to make the results public in a news conference rather than wait for formal publication of their findings. The complete results have never been made public. Now, however, a secondary analysis of the results have suggested that the vaccine was not quite as good as people had believed, reducing infections by only 24%, which was not statistically significant, according to researchers who spoke with Science magazine. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Preventing Laptop Theft with a USB Flashdrive
KeelyNet You can use a flash drive as a laptop alarm to prevent your laptop from being stolen. When a thief removes the laptop from the table, the USB flash drive will be disconnected from the laptop and a loud siren will sound. In addition to sounding an alarm, the software sends an alert to your cell phone. Even if the thief gets away with the laptop, its data is destroyed by the software, so your identity can’t be stolen. / (I'd suggest you cover the flashdrive with a napkin, book, paper, something so no one would see it. - JWD) Here's how:

1. Install free software on your laptop. lalarm.com/LaptopAlarm.
2. Fasten a neck strap to the flash drive.
3. Fasten the other end of the strap to a table.
4. Plug the flash drive into the USB port of a laptop.
5. Lock the laptop by pressing the Windows logo key and “L” key together.
- Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Dollar Reaches Breaking Point as Banks Shift Reserves
Central banks flush with record reserves are increasingly snubbing dollars in favor of euros and yen, further pressuring the greenback after its biggest two- quarter rout in almost two decades. Policy makers boosted foreign currency holdings by $413 billion last quarter, the most since at least 2003, to $7.3 trillion, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. Nations reporting currency breakdowns put 63 percent of the new cash into euros and yen in April, May and June, the latest Barclays Capital data show. That's the highest percentage in any quarter with more than an $80 billion increase. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - The Spy In Your Hand
Don't talk: your cell phone may be eavesdropping. Thanks to recent developments in "spy phone" software, a do-it-yourself spook can now wirelessly transfer a wiretapping program to any mobile phone. The programs are inexpensive, and the transfer requires no special skill. The would-be spy needs to get his hands on your phone to press keys authorizing the download, but it takes just a few minutes—about the time needed to download a ringtone. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Whitopias - Refugees of Diversity
KeelyNet Imagine moving to a place where you can leave your front door unlocked as you run errands. Where the community enjoys a winning ratio of playgrounds to potholes. Where you can turn your kids loose at 3 P.M., not worry, then see them in time for supper. Where the neighbors greet you by name. Where your trouble-free high school feels like a de-facto private school. Where if you play hooky from work, you can drive just 20 minutes and put your sailboat on the water. Where you can joyride off-road vehicles (Snowmobiles! ATVs! Mountain bikes! Rock crawlers!) on nature's bold terrain. Where your family and abundant friends feel close to the soil. Where suburban blight has yet to spoil vistas. Just imagine. If you could move to such a place, would you? If so, you would join a growing number of white Americans homesteading in a constellation of small towns and so-called "exurbs" that are extremely white. They are creating communal pods that cannily preserve a white-bread world, a throwback to an imagined past with "authentic" 1950s values but with the nifty suburban amenities available today. "So many of the people that are here have come from areas where they have seen diversity done badly," says Carol Sapp, a prominent civic and business leader in St. George, Utah, a bona fide Whitopia. Denise Larsen moved to the St. George area from Milwaukee with her husband and young daughters in 1997. "When we heard the gang shootings, we thought, 'It's time to move,'" Larsen tells me over soda pop at Wendy's. "This kid tried to leave a gang; they shot up his dad down the block from us. I guess you don't try and leave a gang. We could no longer let our kids ride their bikes around. Here, they could ride all the way down to the Virgin River, and we don't have to worry about it." For a mother frustrated with having her daughters bused across town due to a desegregation order, fed up with shoveling snow, and terrified of the gunshots ringing out, her new, Whitopian community is the perfect elixir. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - The End of the Email Era
Email has had a good run as king of communications. But its reign is over. In its place, a new generation of services is starting to take hold - services like Twitter and Facebook and countless others vying for a piece of the new world. And just as email did more than a decade ago, this shift promises to profoundly rewrite the way we communicate - in ways we can only begin to imagine. We all still use email, of course. But email was better suited to the way we used to use the Internet—logging off and on, checking our messages in bursts. Now, we are always connected, whether we are sitting at a desk or on a mobile phone. The always-on connection, in turn, has created a host of new ways to communicate that are much faster than email, and more fun. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - UFO Micro Furnace – For Performing Assays Of Precious Metal Ore
KeelyNet UFO Micro Furnace is the world’s smallest, lightest, most portable, easiest to use and most affordable furnace for performing assays of precious metal ore. It is the only one that can be taken to the mine site, and is so simple to use that a trip to the assay office in town is no longer necessary. UFO stands for Unbelievable Firing Object. What you receive with the UFO Micro Furnace is the docking station, 4 1.5 inch cupels, 1 base peice, 1 top, 1 pair of tongs, 1 torch with a four foot hose and swirl flame tip, and 4 ounces of Amalgamite. You will also recieve the new instructional cd. This is what you need to get started. With this unit, you can easily melt gold, platinum and silver… This unit also purifies the precious metals more each time you process it. There is no need for MAPP gas, as plain old propane does the trick. For the first time ever, the prospector or miner can do on-the-spot assays, at the mine site or clean up concentrates at the river’s edge, and go home with sellable gold in their hand. This unit will all fit in a backpack, along with two or three bottles of propane and you still have room for your lunch. The furnace itself will fit right in your shirt pocket. This “little hottie” will easily melt gold, silver and platinum, (with Amalgamite). - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Rage at Government for Doing Too Much and Not Enough
Americans have historically swung between anger at big business and anger at Washington. This year their rage has targeted business and government with equal fury. Public frustration over Wall Street failures that led to the financial crisis was typified by the uproar over bonus payments to American International Group Inc. executives. Those feelings haven't dissipated, political strategists say. At the same time, Americans are equally upset at what they call overreaching by Congress and federal bureaucrats, with protesters taking to the streets to decry "socialism" and a "government takeover" of the economy. Policy makers face a quandary. With voters simultaneously recoiling at laissez-faire policies and a big-government approach neither party in Washington seems capable of corralling an angry public. "I think this is a very populist moment," said Vin Weber, a former Minnesota congressman and now a top Republican strategist. "People held onto their distrust of big business and Wall Street, but what has happened is their distrust of big government has come back as well." - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - The DIY fish supper: Future kitchen grows its own vegetables and seafood
KeelyNet A study produced to help buyers at John Lewis plan for changing lifestyles details how technology can preserve the quality of life while dramatically cutting energy and water use. It highlights advances already in development such as washing machines and dishwashers which clean with sound waves. Future cooks will use an indoor biosphere which grows vegetables and fish ready to be prepared with absolute freshness. There will also be 'frugal fridges' which will suggest recipes based on what is inside and even compact and recycle food waste. But perhaps most dramatic is the self-contained biosphere farm, created by Philips, to provide fish and fresh produce 52 weeks a year. It will also deliver fresh hydrogen, which can be used to power a car, and run on food waste from the kitchen. The plants produce oxygen, which is fed into the fish tank to keep the occupants happy. The tank is kept clean by shrimps, which can also be eaten. Elsewhere in the house, showers will filter waste water through a bed of reeds, allowing it to be reused to flush the lavatory or even make a cup of tea using, of course, a low-energy kettle. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - App Store 'Name Squatters' Drawing Attention
Recombu publicizes complaints from App Store developers about other users "squatting" on application names, taking advantage of Apple's policy requiring that each application have a unique name to claim certain names for themselves without actually releasing an application. The issue was brought to light by iPhone game developers at Atomic Antelope who recently discovered that the name they desired for their latest iPhone game was unavailable despite there being no application by that name in the App Store. The issue arises because iTunes Connect allows users to partially submit an application at any time without requiring that an application binary be submitted. Consequently, a developer need only register for the iPhone Developer Program, select a unique application title, and add entries for a few required data fields. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Look into my eyes: The power of hypnosis
KeelyNet "I think hypnosis is underaccepted and undervalued," says psychologist Irving Kirsch at the University of Hull, UK. "Partly because of lurid tales published in books and movies, which lead to views of hypnosis as a strange and unbelievable state. Still many people scoff." Aside from improving the reputation of hypnosis, Oakley also aims to better understand some of the strangest neurological conditions out there. The idea is to use hypnosis to induce symptoms in otherwise healthy people. This creates "virtual patients" with symptoms that can literally be switched on and off with a snap of the fingers, making it easier to study the abnormal brain activity that causes them. "It's like reverse engineering," says Peter Halligan, a neuropsychologist at Cardiff University, UK, who works with Oakley. "It's only when things break down that you appreciate the mechanism involved." For their experiments, Halligan and Oakley have focused on a range of rare and bizarre conditions. They include hysterical blindness (the person cannot see but has no perceptible damage to their eyes or brain), hysterical paralysis (an inability to move a part of the body despite having no physical injury - the same limb may move while the person is asleep), prosopagnosia (an inability to recognise faces despite having good sight), alien limb syndrome (the feeling that an arm or leg is acting of its own accord), visual neglect (total lack of awareness of half of the visual field) and Capgras syndrome (a delusional belief that a loved one has been replaced by an imposter). These are all conditions that the researchers believe can be recreated in healthy people using hypnosis. Many of them are somatoform disorders, in which people develop physical symptoms in the absence of an identifiable physical cause. All are rare, and when they occur it is often in people with other problems, such as depression or schizophrenia, making them hard to study. Halligan and colleagues put 12 highly hypnotisable students under and then either suggested that their left leg was paralysed, or told them to merely pretend that their left leg was paralysed, with the promise of a reward if they managed to fool an investigator. The investigators, unaware of which group the participants were in, couldn't tell who was faking paralysis - until they saw scans of the volunteers brains. There were clear differences in brain activity. One of the brain areas that was highly active, or "lit up", in the hypnotically paralysed volunteers was the right orbitofrontal cortex - a region thought to be involved with emotional inhibition, and which has also been seen to light up in hysterical paralysis. Yann Cojan at the University of Geneva in Switzerland recently tried a similar experiment where volunteers' left hands were "paralysed" by hypnosis. He and his colleagues also found that brain scans distinguished those under hypnotic suggestion from the fakers. - Full Article Source. For more information and learn how to do it, along with fascinating experiments, check out my 3 eBooks on one CD at Learn how to Hypnotize!.

10/14/09 - Curse Removal Fee $1,250
A woman claiming to be a psychic was arrested Friday for trying to scam a Long Island woman out of more than $1,000 by telling her she was cursed and selling her a stone and a clear plastic bag filled with a red liquid to lift the curse, police said. Tiffany Evans, 22, was arrested by undercover officers at Smith Haven Mall in Lake Grove after pretending to read a Smithtown woman's fortune, and trying to settle a debt of $650 for removing a supposed curse, police said. Evans also tried to sell the woman candles for $550, which she claimed would get rid of negative energy, police said. She was charged with fraudulent accosting, fortune telling and attempted grand larceny, all misdemeanors. It's legal if you call it religion. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Man Of Your Dreams - Psychic Projection or what?
KeelyNet In January 2006 in New York, the patient of a well-known psychiatrist draws the face of a man that has been repeatedly appearing in her dreams. In more than one occasion that man has given her advice on her private life. The woman swears she has never met the man in her life. That portrait lies forgotten on the psychiatrist's desk for a few days until one day another patient recognizes that face and says that the man has often visited him in his dreams. He also claims he has never seen that man in his waking life. The psychiatrist decides to send the portrait to some of his colleagues that have patients with recurrent dreams. Within a few months, four patients recognize the man as a frequent presence in their own dreams. All the patients refer to him as THIS MAN. From January 2006 until today, at least 2000 people have claimed they have seen this man in their dreams, in many cities all over the world: Los Angeles, Berlin, Sao Paulo, Tehran, Beijing, Rome, Barcelona, Stockholm, Paris, New Dehli, Moskow etc. - Full Article Source

10/14/09 - Aim Tasers lower, police told
Taser International said in a bulletin that it's no longer advisable to aim the conducted energy weapon, which sends out a jolt of electricity, at a target's chest area to avoid impact to the heart. "[W]e have lowered the recommended point of aim from centre of mass to lower centre of mass for front shots," the company said in a new training bulletin. Rather than the chest area, which could lead to electricity affecting the heart, the company said police officers should target the back, legs or abdomen. "Finally this is an acknowledgment from Taser that the weapon isn't as safe as they've been claiming," she said Sunday. "Hopefully this will make police even more skeptical about using Tasers." Amnesty International says 330 people died in the United States after being jolted by stun guns between June 2001 and late 2008. In Canada, the human rights watchdog says at least 26 such deaths occurred from 2003 to 2008. - Full Article Source

10/12/09 - Peugot BB1 Electric has 75 mile range
KeelyNet The Peugeot BB1, a cross between a scooter and a car, is powered by two electric motors which are mounted in the rear wheels. nspired by Peugeot’s electric VLV from the 1940s, the new all-electric BB1 represents the car firm’s view for the future of electrical-based urban mobility. At just 2.5m long, the bubble-shaped BB1 can amazingly seat four people in saddle-like seats and its packaging miracle is achieved by rethinking the driving task. There are no pedals so the driver sits more upright with the rear passenger's legs around the driver's torso, motorbike pillion-style. There is no room for a steering wheel either and the driver uses handlebars to control the mini vehicle, which is undoubtedly a real head-turner. The rear-wheel driven car is powered by two electric engines which give it plenty of poke. It can reach 0 to 19 mph in 2.8 seconds and 19 to 37 mph in an impressive four seconds, with a top speed of around 65mph. The power for the vehicle is provided by two lithium-ion battery packs supplying energy to the respective electric motors located under the right and left-hand rear seats, with a comfortable range of 75 miles. / As with a bike, the driver steers via a pair of handlebars, which rotates through 40 degrees each way for a very compact seven-metre turning circle. BB1 is propelled by two rear-mounted in-wheel electric motors co-developed with tyre-maker Michelin, which has been working on this technology for some years. Each motor develops 20bhp peak power, but more significantly, 236lb ft at each wheel. No wonder designer Yann Pissonier, who has driven the prototype, describes BB1's acceleration as 'vivacious'. The concept's body is carbonfibre, contributing to its low 550kg weight, though a production version would be clothed in different materials to reduce costs - a rough price for this city transport would be half the price of the Mitsubishi-based Peugeot Ion, at 15,000 euros (Ł13,000 or $22,152.35USD). - Full Article Source

10/12/09 - Dyson launches the bladeless electric fan
KeelyNet The Dyson Air Multiplier fan – which looks like something straight out of a sci-fi movie - uses advancements in airflow engineering instead of traditional blades to ‘multiply’ air 15 times and push out 119 gallons of smooth and uninterrupted air every second. As a result, Dyson claims the bladeless fan, which works by forcing a jet of air out of a narrow circular slit and then over an aerofoil-shaped blade, is at least as efficient as its bladed counterpart, more comfortable and much safer. Mr Dyson and his team of fluid dynamics engineers developed the technology behind the bladeless fan after studying the performance of an earlier Dyson invention, the Dyson Airblade commercial hand dryer that uses sheets of clean air travelling at 400mph to dry hands far more quickly and efficiently than rivals. A team of fluid dynamics engineers spent four years running hundreds of simulations to precisely measure and optimise the machine’s circular aperture and airfoil-shaped ramp before perfecting Dyson’s Air Multiplier technology. The new fan works by drawing air into the base of the machine. The air is forced up into the loop amplifier and accelerated through the 1.3mm annular aperture, creating a jet of air that hugs the airfoil-shaped ramp. While exiting the loop amplifier, the jet pulls air from behind the fan into the airflow (inducement). At the same time, the surrounding air from the front and sides of the machine are forced into the air stream (entrainment), amplifying it 15 times. The result is a constant uninterrupted flow of cooling air. The Dyson Air Multiplier is powered by an energy efficient brushless motor and air speed can be precisely adjusted with a dimmer switch. It will be available in two sizes, a 10-inch model costing $300 and a 12-inch model costing $330. / Available initially in America and Australia, the Dyson Air Multiplier fan uses engineering to ‘multiply’ air 15 times and push out 119 gallons of smooth and uninterrupted air every second according to the company. "We realised that this inducement, or amplification, effect could be further enhanced by passing airflow over a ramp," says Dyson. "And of course this was the point where the idea of a bladeless fan became a real possibility. Here was a way to create turbulent-free air and finally do away with blades." said James Dyson who became a technology tsar for the Conservative party in the UK. According to the company "Air is drawn into the base of the machine. The air is forced up into the loop amplifier and accelerated through the 1.3mm annular aperture, creating a jet of air that hugs the airfoil- shaped ramp. While exiting the loop amplifier, the jet pulls air from behind the fan into the airflow (inducement). At the same time, the surrounding air from the front and sides of the machine are forced into the air stream (entrainment), amplifying it 15 times. The result is a constant uninterrupted flow of cooling air." The fan will come in three versions and two sizes; a 10- an 12-inch option and two different colour schemes. - Full Article Source

10/12/09 - Amazing Wunder Boner
Aired several years ago late night on OLN. Yes, It's 100% REAL! You laugh now...juuuuuust watch! - Full Article Source

10/12/09 - Update on Cornish Hydrogen Generator US Patent #4,702,894
KeelyNet "We are setting up self dependent villages in the Southern African region. As an eg, one village (normaly arround 500) grows maize, the next produces Bio diesel from this maize, the third has cattle etc.

Our bio diesel plant runs on the Indian technology, we de-sal water through a Grahamtech reverse osmosis process, produce electricity through a Hydrogen generator feeding a generator."

This email initially caught my attention because he mentioned he was "producing electricity through a hydrogen generator feeding a generator". I had never heard of anybody doing that before, so I emailed him back to try and get a clarification on what he was doing. His response was...

Bill - The H2 is produced on demand in an HSU, more info at "cornish hydrogen" under google etc. The resultant pollution is virtualy 0, therefore high carbon credits. - Prof F Cornish

I was still a little skeptical, so I sent him another email inquiry trying to nail down exactly what he was doing down there in South Africa. His last response was...

Bill - We run all on aired down Hydrogen, we built our units together with Aerovlot back in the 80's & 90's, and as per the figures picked up, the unit runns alone for > 24 hours on a spool costing Rsa 12-00 ($1.80), which runs our remote pumps, heating and lighting for 10-20 houses. - Regards Prof F Cornish / (Thanks to Frane for the headsup! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/11/09 - 2012 stirs Apocalypse Predictions, Doomsayers
KeelyNet Next month Hollywood's "2012" opens in cinemas, featuring earthquakes, meteor showers and a tsunami dumping an aircraft carrier on the White House. A significant time period for the Mayas does end on the date, and enthusiasts have found a series of astronomical alignments they say coincide in 2012, including one that happens roughly only once every 25,800 years. Monument Six found at an obscure ruin in southern Mexico during highway construction in the 1960s, the stone tablet almost didn't survive; the site was largely paved over and parts of the tablet were looted. It's unique in that the remaining parts contain the equivalent of the date 2012. The inscription describes something that is supposed to occur in 2012 involving Bolon Yokte, a mysterious Mayan god associated with both war and creation. However – shades of Indiana Jones – erosion and a crack in the stone make the end of the passage almost illegible. Archaeologist Guillermo Bernal of Mexico's National Autonomous University interprets the last eroded glyphs as maybe saying, "He will descend from the sky."Spooky, perhaps, but Bernal notes there are other inscriptions at Mayan sites for dates far beyond 2012 – including one that roughly translates into the year 4772. / Additional Info - The Tortuguero inscription says that when the completion of 13 baktuns occurs on 4 ahau 3 kankin, December 21 2012, “it will occur – it will be the descent of the Bolon Yokte K’uh (Nine Support Gods) to the…” It’s tempting to imagine that the missing word is “Earth”, but we can see the outline of the glyph and a search in the Maya glyph dictionary didn’t find a match for Earth or World. However, the “it” that will occur is semi-visible and looks like the glyph for darkness. In the Chilam Balam of Chumayel, it says that in katun 4 Ahau (which is the katun from April 1993 to December 2012) the feathered serpent god, Kukulcan, will return. This god originated with the Toltecs as Quetzalcoatl and it is now known that the original Quetzalcoatl religion was about raising a serpent-like energy up the spine – the very same concept as the Hindu concept of kundalini. In the Aztec myth, Quetzalcoatl sacrificed himself, spent eight days in the underworld and reappeared as Venus. He is expected to return between Venus transits, and we are now between the Venus transit of June 2004 and the next one in June 2012. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - New wireless road-charging system gives electric vehicles endless range
A German auto engineering company is working on a project that just might solve the world's oil problems. IAV Automotive Engineering has secured a patent for their electric vehicle (EV) wireless road-charging system. Conceptually, roads would be fitted with electrical conductors that create magnetic fields, which charge your battery powered vehicle as you drive. Radio chips would identify your vehicle and bill you appropriately. The conductors are resistant to both weather and mechanical wear. This system eliminates many of the common difficulties and headaches associated with EVs. It extends the range of an EV to virtually limitless, and there is no need for long charging times or battery exchanges. The IAV system is completely cordless and can even charge an EV while it's parked. The conductors embedded in roadways are equipped with sensors that only activate them when a vehicle is present. They also use precisely controlled frequencies of alternating current. This ensures a high efficiency electricity transfer to and from circuits in the road and the vehicle. Test results at IAV show a 90% efficiency transfer. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Sentient cities may answer back
KeelyNet It may look like an ordinary rubbish bin, but don't let that fool you. Throw an aluminium can in here and you'd be none the wiser, but try chucking a plastic bottle away, and with an angry buzz it will throw it back out at you, fans whirring to rid itself of the wrong kind of rubbish. This is the 'smart trash can', part of the 'Toward the Sentient City' exhibition in New York, which explores how our lives might change when we can embed computers in anything and everything. / 'Natural Fuse' by Usman Haque, a London-based architect, who created a network of houseplants attached to the electrical system, which monitor energy use - if the system's members use too much power, some of the plants are killed, but if they collectively reduce their energy use the plants thrive, increasing their ability to capture carbon, and the energy available to all. The potential for technology to change our behaviour, for example by helping us engage with previously unseen places like rubbish dumps or rivers, or by holding our houseplants hostage, is a common theme, and one which the exhibition's curator, Mark Shepard, says he hopes will encourage debate about how we want our cities, and our lives, to change. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Why letting your cell phone charge overnight is killing the planet
What happens if you leave yours plugged in all night? According to measurements from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the average cell phone draws 3.68 watts of power from the outlet while it's charging and 2.24 watts when charged. Let's take the worst-case scenario and assume that you're over-juicing a charged battery for the entire night. Leave the average phone plugged in for eight unnecessary hours, and it'll use about 0.018 kilowatt-hours of electricity. Do that every night for a week, and the figure rises to 0.13 kWh; every night for a year, and you're looking at a grand total of 6.5 kWh of electricity. Given that the average American's residential electricity consumption is more than 4,000 kWh each year (PDF), the Lantern doesn't think that a handful of kilowatt-hours are worth much tossing and turning. You could do way more for the planet, for example, by swapping out a single incandescent light bulb in your home for a compact fluorescent one; as the Lantern pointed out in a previous column, that simple action alone can save 126 kWh a year. Plus, charging your gadgets while you sleep has the added benefit of shifting a tiny fraction of your energy usage from the daytime, when demand is highest, to the nighttime, making things just a bit easier on your local grid. What if you leave your phone charger plugged in all the time, even when the phone itself isn't attached—how much vampire power would that suck up? Again using the Berkeley Lab figures, if the average charger is plugged in for the entire 8,760 hours of the year, it'll use about 2.3 kWh of electricity. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - It has blades: Dyson’s little white lie
KeelyNet At first this seemed extremely exciting, but how is the air being moved? We were hoping for a device operating via ionic wind but that’s simply not the case. Some of us think the bladeless claim is an outright lie, others understand it from a marketing stance, but we all agree: a fan with blades is still moving the air. Dyson’s own information page states that “an energy efficient brushless motor” draws the air in with similar technology used in “superchargers and jet engines”, both of which use blades! The fan blades are in the base of this unit, they take in air and blow it out the ring. Just because you can’t see a fan, can we call our computers bladeless, or an air conditioner bladeless? Enter the P.T. Barnum reference. Known as a man who could sell anything, his legacy lives on in the Dyson corporation. At 200 british pounds (~$320) for a ten inch desk fan, what are you getting that’s better than a traditional fan? The design supposedly amplifies the air movement fifteen times, but we’re skeptical about that figure as there’s no energy-saving claim to go along with such an incredible power boost. One thing is certain, you will NOT get a fan without blades for your sterling… just one with hidden blades plus a huge marketing campaign. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Researchers Discover "Magnetic Current"
"Researchers have discovered a magnetic equivalent to electricity. From the article, 'The phenomenon, dubbed "magnetricity," could be used in magnetic storage or in computing. Magnetic monopoles were first predicted to exist over a century ago, as a perfect analogue to electric charges. Although there are protons and electrons with net positive and negative electric charges, there were no particles in existence which carry magnetic charges. Rather, every magnet has a "north" and "south" pole.'" - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - SolaRover – Mobile Solar Power Systems
KeelyNet Environmentally-friendly mobile power generation has arrived. SolaRover™ Mobile Solar Power Systems provide pure, consistent electricity for all types of commercial, industrial and emergency applications — wherever and whenever needed. Categorically clean, absolutely silent and far more economical than comparable diesel generators over the long term, SolaRover systems offer today’s best investments in portable power generators. With unparalleled engineering, leading-edge components, rugged steel construction and a variety of practical options, SolaRover sets the benchmark high. # 24×7 power option / # As low as 30% sunlight yields 60% charge / # Ruggedized for harsh terrain and severe weather conditions... - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Just a spoonful of honegar
Inventor of a honey and vinegar mixture, called Honegar, Dr. DeForest C. Jarvis. Honegar was said to be a folk remedy for aches and pains, though it mainly sounds like a cure for lack of nausea. With a label that evoked a bee hive and a consistency that mirrored that of caster oil, this seems like an invention that might have warned off would-be drinkers. Apparently it's still made -- here's a current recipe that " tastes better than it sounds." And those who drink a cider-vinegar version swear that it a homeopathic cure for arthritis. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Romanian student Air Filter wins bronze at ARCA invention fair
Romanian university student Corneliu Birtok-Baneasa of the eastern town of Deva has won bronze in this year ARCA international invention fair of Zagreb for a filter the allows a 20-percent cut in fuel consumption by cars. The air filter invented by him allows for an up to 20 percent cut in fuel consumption in urban traffic. The invention has been experimentally tested on at least 40 vehicles, from the less to the most expensive, and the results were commended by the users. The student does not intend to sell his invention and wants to create a production line in Romania that would manufacture the filters for affordable prices of between RON 80 and 100 ($28-$35US). - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - State Warns Of Top 10 Investor Traps
The annual list of the Top 10 Investor Traps is out with a warning from the Kentucky Department of Financial Institutions to be wary of offers that seem “too good to be true.” Shonita Bossier, the department’s securities division director, urges investors who are feeling pressure from the struggling economy to resist the lure of “too good to be true” offers of making money quickly or “guaranteed” returns. “An educated investor should be alert at all times. Falling into an investment trap makes it harder to get back on solid financial ground,” Bossier said in a release issued by the department. This year’s list identifies natural resources investments, Ponzi schemes, leveraged exchange-traded funds (ETFs), real estate investment schemes and private placement offerings as the greatest potential threats to Kentucky investors. The list is based on scams and traps that DFI examiners have seen in Kentucky and across the United States and is compiled by the Enforcement Trends Project Group of the North American Securities Administrators Association, of which DFI is a member. Many promise high returns to cash-strapped investors but provide little, if any, disclosure of risks. “When it comes to investing, verify everything and everyone before you part with your money,” Bossier said. “Call DFI to make sure the person and product are registered and that no complaints have been filed. Research the investment, and make sure you understand all the terms. Information is an investor’s best defense against securities fraud.” - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Welcome to the world of sci-fi science
Teleportation, time travel, antimatter and wireless electricity. It all sounds far-fetched, more fiction than fact, but it's all true. Everybody is used to science fiction featuring science that seems, well, not very scientific. But you might be surprised at the way some things that seem fantastical have a solid grounding in actual science. It's all closer than we think. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Weird and wacky inventions wowing London
Portable gyms, two-man submarines, aphrodisiac bedsheets, bra fixers and Wondercubes are among the wacky but smart innovations catching the eye at the British Invention Show. Pep Torres, an inventor from Barcelona in Spain, brought a handful of his innovations with him. They include scratch-off postcards, magnetic tea towels that stick to the refrigerator and a pressure-sensitive floor tile that keeps fridge raiders on their diet. "Hey! Put the cream cake down and back away from the fridge!" a strange voice says. Bulgarian entrepreneur Fredy Vasilev has invented Bathomatic, which lets busy people fill their bath at the touch of an iPod, to the right depth, temperature and aroma -- and keeps the water warm. "We tried to create the ultimate house of the future and there were systems for controlling lighting, heating, music -- and nothing for the bathroom," he told AFP. "This allows you to save energy and water." Ehsan Yazdani has invented a portable gym, a lightweight kit on which one can do 15 different workouts, which comes out before the New Year. "You can use it in a hotel, in the office you can have it in the drawer, on long flights, as long as you have a chair," the Iranian said. The exercise product was inspired by being "an office worker spending 10-12 hours a day at the laptop", the telecom consultant explained. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Kite-Powered Generator
KeelyNet The Italian firm KiteGen Research is developing a generator that harnesses the wind through kites. As a kite flies into the air, it unspools a cord that cranks the turbine. Carina Storrs writes in Popular Science: The company developed a prototype that flies 200-square-foot kites to altitudes of 2,600 feet, where wind streams are four times as strong as they are near ground-based wind turbines. As the kite’s tether unspools, it spins an alternator that generates up to 40 kilowatts. Once the kite reaches its peak altitude, it collapses, and motors quickly reel it back in to restart the cycle. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Tiny Implants Could Allow Greater Control Of Prosthetics
A novel implant seeded with muscle cells could better integrate prosthetic limbs with the body, allowing amputees greater control over robotic appendages. The construct, developed at the University of Michigan, consists of tiny cups, made from an electrically conductive polymer, that fit on nerve endings and attract the severed nerves. Electrical signals coming from the nerve can then be translated and used to move the limb. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Get Your Invention Noticed by Yakin’ About It
Yak About It – featured products all started off as ideas, ideas culminated from ordinary people like you and me. The people behind these inventive products had the courage to change their lives as they once knew them and take a risk on their dreams. This vision to bring a product to market and to start a company is not all-encompassing; it’s not a dream shared by everyone. The learning process, hard work, cash investment and time make it all the more special for inventors and independent entrepreneurs when their ideas are brought to market. The problem is that once a product is ready to sell doesn’t mean that a sale is guaranteed. It’s not that the invention or creative product is useless; rather, the product lacks awareness. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Rabbits As Fuel
Thousands of rabbits taken from Stockholm parks are being used to fuel a heating plant in Sweden, London's Daily Telegraph reported - and animal rights' activists are hopping mad. The frozen bunny corpses are transported to a heating plant in central Sweden, where they're incinerated to heat homes. "Those who support the culling of rabbits think it's good to use the bodies for a good cause," said Anna Johanneson of the Society for the Protection of Wild Rabbits. "But it feels like the power company is trying to turn the animals into an industry rather than look at the main problem," Officials target the rabbits to stem the damage done from their feasting on the parks' plants. Last year, 6,000 rabbits were killed, the paper reported. Activists claim it's not only wild rabbits being harvested, but also unwanted pets turned loose in Stockholm's parks. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Sphere bots get some new skills
Spherical robots , or in this case RC vehicles are pretty versatile. They travel about the same on most terrains, including water in some cases. That’s not to say that they travel particularly well on those terrains though. The common problem is that they can’t really climb over bumps very well, until now. We’ve seen a few versions of sphere bots, but they all seem to need fairly level smooth surfaces, aside from that one that went in the water. We hadn’t seen any that really had the oomph necessary to climb stairs though. Actually, we still haven’t seen that, but he says it can in the interview you can watch after the break. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - ScaryGuys Halloween Projects
Here you'll find several projects we've built for our Halloween parties and for our haunts. All are straightforward and relatively easy to build. Please remember to be careful when building anything! - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Job Losses Higher Than Reported
The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) recently announced that they will be making downward benchmark revisions to past monthly nonfarm employment data that casts doubt on the validity of the recent figures as well. As we will explain, it is highly likely that substantially more jobs are now being lost than is currently reported. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Smoking Bans Reduce Heart Attacks and Disease
Bans on smoking in places like restaurants, offices and public buildings reduce cases of heart attacks and heart disease, according to a report released Thursday by a federally commissioned panel of scientists. The report, issued by the Institute of Medicine, concluded that exposure to secondhand smoke significantly increased the risk of a heart attack among both smokers and nonsmokers. The panel also said it found that a reduction in heart problems began fairly quickly after a smoking ban was instituted and that exposure to low or fleeting levels of secondhand smoke could cause cardiovascular problems. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - ‘brain-to-brain communication’
British scientists that they have created a system that allows “brain-to-brain communication”, sending messages formed by one person’s brain signals though an internet connection to another person’s brain many miles away. The scientists used “brain-computer interfacing”, a well-established technique that allows computers to analyse brain signals. Dr James said that his innovation was the transmission of these signals to another person through the internet. During the transmission two people are hooked up to electrodes that measure activity in specific parts of the brain. The first person generates a series of zeros and ones, imagining moving their left arm for zero and right arm for one. The first subject’s computer recognises the binary thoughts and sends them over the internet to the second person’s computer. A lamp is then flashed at two different frequencies for one and zero. The second person’s brain signals are analysed after staring at this lamp and the number sequence is picked up by a computer. It takes about 30 seconds to send four numbers in this way. Dr James said that the next stage was to make the system quicker and simpler. “It’s not telepathy,” Dr James said. “There’s no conscious thought forming in one person’s head and another conscious thought appearing in another person’s mind. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Science addiction
"People have this idea, and I call it the Dilbert idea, that these careers are frustrating, dead-end jobs with a pointy-haired boss, but it's not that way at all," said Sawyer in a lab where Queen's students were working on a sophisticated pool-playing robot nicknamed Deep Green -- a machine he quickly noted had been imagined in the 1972 movie Silent Running. "What I tell young people, who are at the most idealistic point of their lives, is if they want to have a career that will keep them fascinated and busy for the next four decades, this is the field they need to be in." "If you look at Star Trek, which was a major critical success, it was dropped because it only got 35 million viewers," he said with some amusement. "Look at shows in today's 500-channel universe -- nobody gets 35 million viewers for a TV show." - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - The moon belongs to no one – yet
The race back to the moon has been prompted by the realisation that exploiting it may now be within reach. And it poses the question: who gets to use the moon's recoverable resources, such as oxygen or water? This could be resolved through negotiation, as space scientists happily lodging their instruments in foreign spacecraft hope. But the Lunar Treaty drafted by the United Nations in the 1990s has still not been signed by the space powers. Since this leaves the moon unprotected by law - the ultimate terra nullius - we may now see a scramble for territory. History shows that the first step is colonisation and - the pressing issue - staking a claim. Thanks to the explorers Amundsen, Scott and the early sealers, the UK and Norway now claim about one-sixth of Antarctica each. So we may be witnessing a slow-motion reworking of the Antarctica story in which lunar exploration lays the ground for claims. - Full Article Source

10/17/09 - Bad memories written with lasers
Researchers have devised a way to write memories onto the brains of flies, revealing which brain cells are involved in making bad memories. The researchers said that in flies just 12 brain cells were responsible for what is known as "associative learning". This finding, said Professor Miesenbock, has begun to unravel how animals and humans learn from mistakes and how "error signals" drive animals to adapt their behaviour. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - DARPA Tries to Tap Elusive Casimir Effect for Breakthrough Technology
KeelyNet Named for a Dutch physicist, the Casimir effect governs interactions of matter with the energy that is present in a vacuum. Vacuums generally are thought to be voids, but Hendrik Casimir believed these pockets of nothing do indeed contain fluctuations of electromagnetic waves. Recent research done at Harvard University, Vrije University Amsterdam and elsewhere has proved Casimir correct—and given some experimental underpinning to DARPA's request for research proposals. Investigators from five institutions—Harvard, Yale University, the University of California, Riverside, and two national labs, Argonne and Los Alamos—received funding. DARPA will assess the groups' progress in early 2011 to see if any practical applications might emerge from the research. Program documents on the DARPA Web site state the goal of the Casimir Effect Enhancement program "is to develop new methods to control and manipulate attractive and repulsive forces at surfaces based on engineering of the Casimir force. One could leverage this ability to control phenomena such as adhesion in nanodevices, drag on vehicles, and many other interactions of interest to the [Defense Department]." Nanoscale design is the most likely place to start and is also the arena where levitation could emerge. Materials scientists working to build tiny machines called microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) struggle with surface interactions, called van der Waals forces, that can make nanomaterials sticky to the point of permanent adhesion, a phenomenon known as "stiction". To defeat stiction, many MEMS devices are coated with Teflon or similar low-friction substances or are studded with tiny springs that keep the surfaces apart. Materials that did not require such fixes could make nanotechnology more reliable. Such materials could skirt another problem posed by adhesion: Because surface stickiness at the nanoscale is much greater than it is for larger objects, MEMS designers resort to making their devices relatively stiff. That reduces adhesion (stiff structures do not readily bend against each other), but it reduces flexibility and increases power demands. Under certain conditions, manipulating the Casimir effect could create repellant forces between nanoscale surfaces. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Secretive Startup EEStor Worth More Than $1.5 Billion
The secretive startup in Austin, Texas, claims to have developed a new kind of capacitor that can store enough energy to propel an electric car 300 miles on a single charge. The company is not publicly traded, so investors who want to speculate on its “breakthrough technology” claims have only one way to get in on the action: Zenn Motor Company (ZNN: CA). - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Growing Numbers Of Americans Landing In Shelters Due To Foreclosure
KeelyNet Growing numbers of Americans who have lost houses to foreclosure are landing in homeless shelters, according to social service groups and a recent report by a coalition of housing advocates. Only three years ago, foreclosure was rarely a factor in how people became homeless. But among the homeless people that social service agencies have helped over the last year, an average of 10 percent lost homes to foreclosure, according to “Foreclosure to Homelessness 2009,” a survey produced by the National Coalition for the Homeless and six other advocacy groups. In the Midwest, foreclosure played a role for 15 percent of newly homeless people, according to the survey, reflecting soaring rates of unemployment — Ohio’s reached 10.8 percent in August — and aggressive lending to people with damaged credit. Most people who become homeless because of foreclosure had been low-income renters whose landlords stopped making their mortgage payments, leaving them scrambling for new housing with little notice and scant savings, according to the survey and interviews with shelters. But in recent months, there has been a visible increase in the number of former homeowners showing up in shelters. “These families never needed help before,” said Larry Haynes, executive director of Mercy House in Santa Ana, Calif. “They haven’t a clue about where to go, and they have all sorts of humiliation issues. They don’t even know what to say, what to ask for.” Many start off camping out in cars, particularly in warmer places. “We’ve seen a rise in people sleeping in their cars,” said Rick Cole, city manager in Ventura, Calif., which recently allowed car-camping in designated areas. “Some are foreclosed former homeowners, and some couldn’t afford their rent. People will give up their house before they give up their car.” Those with means try to rent homes or apartments, though tainted credit often makes that impossible. Growing numbers are landing in motels that rent by the week, cramming whole families into single rooms and using hot plates as kitchens. But as unemployment expands, many are losing the wherewithal to remain. Many take refuge with families and friends, occupying extra bedrooms, basements and attics. But such hospitality rarely lasts. So, as lean times endure and paychecks disappear, homeless shelters are absorbing those who have run out of alternatives. / (I feel so sorry for all these people being kicked out of their homes, DAMN all who caused it and aren't trying to fix it...you know who....screw health reform and 'the war', it's the ECONOMY STUPID! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Energy glider designer seeks $5M to take off
Inventor Dmitri Cherny's energy glider would rise 1,200 feet into the sky like a kite on a string, and generate electricity as it rises and falls in the winds, its tether turning a flywheel on the ground. Although the company has not yet shown that one of its gliders can be launched and produce electricity, the design is for the flywheel to generate up to 30 kilowatts of power, or up to 130,000 kilowatt hours per year. Highest Wind says its target market is more than 100,000 farms which use more than 150,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year. Cherny said proof-in-principle has been shown by Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor David Olinger and his students, who have put such a glider into operation. Cherny believes he has found a way to make the system stable enough to commercialize. He is developing proprietary software to monitor the glider's in-flight performance through the use of sensors, radio frequencies and computer command. "The software is critical," Cherny said. "The software makes the glider smart enough to know when it's too windy to fly, when the sky is darkening, when the wind speeds are changing, when a storm is coming and it's a good idea to sit on the ground and wait it out." Cherny said the 300-pound, 40-foot glider will fly at a maximum altitude of 1,200 feet within the range of 20 to 40 mph winds, and its altitude can be automatically adjusted to stay within the wind range. If winds are too light, too strong or ice storms advance, radio frequencies should signal the glider to come down. It should stay in the air 85 percent of the time, he said. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - New Method To Help Keep Fruit, Vegetables And Flowers Fresh
KeelyNet Did you know that millions of tons of fruits and vegetables in the United States end up in the trash can before being eaten, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture? Microbiologist George Pierce's method uses a naturally occurring microorganism -- no larger than the width of a human hair -- to induce enzymes that extend the ripening time of fruits and vegetables, and keeps the blooms of flowers fresh. The process does not involve genetic engineering or pathogens, but involves microorganisms known to be associated with plants, and are considered to be helpful and beneficial to them. "These beneficial soil microorganisms serve essentially the same function as eating yogurt as a probiotic to have beneficial organisms living in the gastrointestinal system," Pierce said. The process works by manipulating the organism's diet so that it will over express certain enzymes and activities that work in the ripening process and keeping the flower blooms fresh. In a very simple sense, climacteric plants -- such as apples, bananas, peaches and tomatoes -- respond to climactic change, and when they do, they produce increased levels of signal compounds like ethylene. For fruit such as peaches, ethylene causes the peach to ripen, increases aroma chemicals, but unfortunately, makes the peach very fragile. "If you've seen ripe peaches, they will simply fall apart," Pierce said. "It will lose 90 percent of its ability to resist pressure, which means that if a peach responds normally to ethylene, it is subject to bruising when you ship it." The enzymes produced from Pierce's new method reduce the response to signal compounds so that it takes a longer period of time for fruits to ripen, doubling the time it takes for ripening. The catalyst in this process can be distributed through various formulations and configurations. These include being incorporated into shipping boxes, packing materials or used to treat the air of shipping containers. It could be used either with individual fruits or vegetables or for larger, bulk quantities. This new process could have a big impact on preventing waste, improving the consumption of healthy fruits and vegetables, allowing companies to ship produce longer distances. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - The Medical Benefits of Carbon Monoxide
"For more than a century, carbon monoxide has been known as a deadly toxin. In an 1839 story, Edgar Allan Poe wrote of 'miraculous lustre of the eye' and 'nervous agitation' in what some believe are descriptions of carbon monoxide poisoning, and today, cigarette cartons warn of its health dangers. But a growing body of research, much of it by local scientists, is revealing a paradox: the gas often called a silent killer could also be a medical treatment. It seems like a radical contradiction, but animal studies show that in small, extremely controlled doses the gas has benefits in everything from infections to organ transplantation." - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Shawnee inventor’s advice to stop burglaries is simple: Zip it
KeelyNet A new locking system promises to thwart thieves, and its developer says it will be made in Shawnee. Stan Demster has begun to produce and market the Doorzipper, a new device that “turns anybody’s door into a bank vault,” Demster says. “We do our testing on the cheapest door you can buy at Lowe’s, and you cannot beat it in,” he said. Doorzipper engages 24 interlocking stainless steel tabs along the edge of any door when a key or latch, just like a deadbolt, is used to twist them into place. The first Doorzippers were installed last year, Demster says, and the product’s patent has been pending for about nine months. Demster said he quickly realized his first locking mechanism had several flaws. “Being a young man, I didn’t realize it was a great lock, they couldn’t pick the lock or anything, but they could just kick the door in,” he said. “I realized the issue was making the door force proof.” It then took another 15 years to develop a lock that would reinforce the doorjamb and the door itself, and even stay hidden from sight: the Doorzipper. Similar to putting several locks down the side of a door, as often seen in popular culture images of New York City apartments, the Doorzipper reinforces the door along its length. But because one strip of upward-facing steel tabs is put on the inside of the door, and one strip of downward-facing tabs is put on the inside of the doorframe, it is invisible when the door is closed. The strip on the doorframe is nailed into the studs of a home, further reinforcing it, whereas many deadbolts are only nailed into a flimsier wooden support inside the doorframe, Demster said. Other benefits of the lock: it is easy to rekey; it is unable to be broken into with “bump keys,” keys that will work for all locks of the same type, or “key bumping,” a way of picking locks; and it more forcefully pulls the door up against weather sealing, saving energy. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - The US's Reverse Brain Drain
TechCrunch has a piece by an invited expert on the reverse brain drain already evident and growing in the US as Indian, Chinese, and European students and workers in the US plan to return home, or already have. From an extensive interview with Chinese and Indian workers who had already left: "We learned that these workers returned in their prime: the average age of the Indian returnees was 30 and the Chinese was 33. They were really well educated: 51% of the Chinese held masters degrees and 41% had PhDs. Among Indians, 66% held a masters and 12% had PhDs. These degrees were mostly in management, technology, and science. ... What propelled them to return home? Some 84% of the Chinese and 69% of the Indians cited professional opportunities. And while they make less money in absolute terms at home, most said their salaries brought a 'better quality of life' than what they had in the US. ... A return ticket home also put their career on steroids. About 10% of the Indians polled had held senior management jobs in the US. That number rose to 44% after they returned home. Among the Chinese, the number rose from 9% in the US to 36% in China." - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Alzheimer’s victims fitted with GPS-like U-TDOA
KeelyNet First it was for finding stolen cars, then keeping track of criminals, now Alzheimer’s sufferers are being fitted with tracking devices. This has been going on for some time now, but unlike the old tracking devices we’re seeing an update in technology to take advantage of the cell network for communications. The person wearing the device can be located using Uplink Time Difference Of Arrival or U-TDOA. This is the same technology that is used by 911 services to calculate the location of a cell phone. Alzheimer’s is a frightening disease. The thought of a loved one wandering off with nothing to identify them and no recollection of who they are is a fear of every family dealing with the illness. There’s no doubt that this is a cost-effective solution that really works. / U-TDOA - Uplink Time Difference of Arrival, is a real time locating technology for mobile phone networks that uses multilateration based on timing of received signals to locate a mobile phone. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Cosmic Radiation Makes Trees Grow Faster
"The BBC reports that researchers at the University of Edinburgh have found that Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs) somehow makes trees grow faster. GCRs vary according to the 11-year solar cycle, with more GCRs hitting the Earth during solar minimum when there is a lull in the solar wind, which normally acts to protect the inner solar system from external galactic radiation. The mechanism might have something to do with GCRs increasing cloud cover, which diffuses sunlight and increases the efficiency of photosynthesis. Nevertheless, the researchers remain mystified and are requesting further ideas and research collaboration to test hypotheses. (How about Radiation Hormesis, AKA 'Vitamin-R?')" Here is the paper's abstract at the journal New Phytologist. The researchers say: "The relation of the rings to the solar cycle was much stronger than to any climatological factors. ... As for the mechanism, we are puzzled." - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Firefox Now Auto-Blocks Microsoft .NET Extensions
KeelyNet Firefox users on Windows probably have the .NET Framework Assistant extension installed, even if they didn't try to install it. Microsoft issued a high-priority security patch for Windows systems and through Internet Explorer's update mechanism, but for Firefox users who haven't applied the patch, Mozilla has added the Microsoft .Net Framework Assistant and Windows Presentation Foundation extensions to its blocklist, noting that users should see the extensions disabled upon their next log-in. Update: Mozilla security chief Mike Shaver writes in a blog post that Mozilla has removed .NET Framework Assistant from its blocklist, as the extension was determined not to be a vulnerability to the "browse once and own" code exploit. Shaver writes that a more thorough explanation, and tips on how to prevent and customize auto-blocking, will follow. If you still see those extensions enabled on your Windows system, Mozilla's security chief has written about the special means of removing them, as they often can't be disabled by default. Better still, if you see extensions in your Firefox Add-Ons menu that you can't quite remember installing, or question what purpose they serve, take this as a lesson in why uninstalling them might be a good idea. - Full Article Source / Firefox Disables Microsoft .NET Addon - "Around 11:45 PM Friday night, I was prompted by Firefox that it had disabled the addons that Microsoft has been including with .NET — specifically, the .NET Framework Assistant and the Windows Presentation Foundation. The popup announcing this said that the 'following addons have been known to cause stability or security issues with Firefox.' Thanks, Mozilla team, for hitting the kill switch and hopefully this will get Microsoft to release a patch sooner." - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Creators Try Pick-Your-Price Experiment
2D Boy, the independent game studio behind World of Goo, recently celebrated the game's one-year anniversary by offering it at whatever price buyers cared to pay. They've now released some sales statistics about how people responded to the opportunity. The average price during the sale was $2.03; the game normally retails for $20. According to a survey of why people paid what they did, 22.4% said it was all they could afford at the time, and 12.4% said they already owned World of Goo and were buying it for a different platform. (Yes, there is a Linux version.) Over 57,000 people took advantage of the offer, which was enough for 2D Boy to term it "a huge success." Interestingly, they also saw a significant increase in sales through Steam, and a smaller increase through Wiiware. They've decided to extend the experiment until October 25th. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Tiny Pallet House offers cheap, quick Emergency Housing
KeelyNet As hurricane Gustav plowed across Cuba headed for the gulf coast of the United States memories of Katrina and the potential displacement of thousands got me thinking. I wanted to do something to help. It occurred to me that someone else might find what I now [sic] about building with shipping pallets useful in the coming weeks and months. So I setup this simple micro-blog to make it easy to show others one way to build with pallets. The tiny house pictured here would use about 50 to 70 pallets. I left the roof off the design because I’m thinking more and more that the roof should be conventionally framed. Pallets over head just seems a little too risky, although I think Roy is going to find a way to do it safely. For those of you playing with Google SketchUp here is my SketchUp file. Also note that the pallets in the drawing are an odd size, 45? by 40?. That may explain why Roy had such a hard time getting rid of them. Standard 48? by 40? pallets tend to be easy to sell and give away, odd sized pallets are a different story. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Smoking Bans Reduce Heart Attacks and Disease
Bans on smoking in places like restaurants, offices and public buildings reduce cases of heart attacks and heart disease, according to a report released Thursday by a federally commissioned panel of scientists. The report, issued by the Institute of Medicine, concluded that exposure to secondhand smoke significantly increased the risk of a heart attack among both smokers and nonsmokers. The panel also said it found that a reduction in heart problems began fairly quickly after a smoking ban was instituted and that exposure to low or fleeting levels of secondhand smoke could cause cardiovascular problems. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Youth of Today are the Lost Generation
KeelyNet Bright, eager - and unwanted. While unemployment is ravaging just about every part of the global workforce, the most enduring harm is being done to young people who can't grab onto the first rung of the career ladder. Affected are a range of young people, from high school dropouts, to college grads, to newly minted lawyers and MBAs across the developed world from Britain to Japan. One indication: In the U.S., the unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds has climbed to more than 18%, from 13% a year ago. For people just starting their careers, the damage may be deep and long-lasting, potentially creating a kind of "lost generation." Studies suggest that an extended period of youthful joblessness can significantly depress lifetime income as people get stuck in jobs that are beneath their capabilities, or come to be seen by employers as damaged goods. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Senate Approves Bill for Hydrogen Car Research
The hydrogen car may have legions of fervent fans, but Energy Secretary Steven Chu apparently is not among them. Earlier this year, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist essentially zeroed government funding for the clean vehicles and came close to mocking their potential, saying the technology needs four "miracles" before it can become widely adopted. "Saints only need three," he cracked in a magazine interview. But the hydrogen car is back. On Thursday, the Senate agreed to restore nearly all the money for hydrogen car research that the administration had proposed to cut. The measure, part of an appropriations bill previously approved by the House, is expected to be signed by President Obama. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Energy Dept. Audit Finds Flaws in Its Energy Star Program
KeelyNet The Energy Department has concluded in an internal audit that it does not properly track whether manufacturers that give their appliances an Energy Star label have met the required specifications for energy efficiency. Some manufacturers could therefore be putting the stickers on unqualified products, according to the audit, by the Energy Department’s inspector general, Gregory H. Friedman. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Dems look to debt for 'doc fix'
When President Barack Obama promised that health care reform would be fully paid for, many wondered how Democrats would fund a key provision whose cost is almost a third of the reform’s $900 billion price tag: protecting doctors from annual cuts to their Medicare reimbursement rates. The Senate’s answer? Leave it out of the health care bill, rename it a “budgetary problem” and fix it separately — but without paying for it — by lumping it into the national debt. Voilŕ, promise kept. That’s how Senate Democrats are dealing with their $245 billion Medicare reimbursement dilemma. The so-called doc fix was long expected to be part of comprehensive health care reform, but House and Senate Democrats now are signaling that they plan separate bills to deal with the expensive problem. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Nobel winner slams Bible as 'handbook of bad morals'
KeelyNet KeelyNet

A row broke out in Portugal on Monday after a Nobel Prize-winning author denounced the Bible as a "handbook of bad morals". Speaking at the launch of his new book "Cain", Jose Saramago, who won the 1998 Nobel Prize for Literature, said society would probably be better off without the Bible. Roman Catholic Church leaders accused the 86-year-old of a publicity stunt. The book is an ironic retelling of the Biblical story of Cain, Adam and Eve's son who killed his younger brother Abel. / "The Bible is a manual of bad morals (which) has a powerful influence on our culture and even our way of life. Without the Bible, we would be different, and probably better people," he was quoted as saying by the news agency Lusa. Saramago attacked "a cruel, jealous and unbearable God (who) exists only in our heads" and said he did not think his book would cause problems for the Catholic Church "because Catholics do not read the Bible. "It might offend Jews, but that doesn't really matter to me," he added. / (Amen! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - America Moving from Kingdom of Cash to Socialism Slowly but Surely
Philosophers say that capitalism is driven not by hard cash, but rather, striving for hard cash. It’s driven not by the production of goods, but rather, striving for consumption of these goods. If everyone had these values, the “dog-eat-dog” principal would be the major principal in the world history. But America failed to do it. There are plenty of “underdeveloped” people in the world who continue to cherish spiritual values. There are not that many chances left to force them into worshiping money since these “underdeveloped” people adopt western technology and become stronger. The appeal to adopt American values doesn’t work either. Why would we adopt the system if the system is in crisis? Pragmatic America realized that billions of people are not willing to live in the kingdom of hard cash and decided that it would be better off leaving this kingdom itself. Now the USA is talking about introducing elements of socialism. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Commandos Field Test ‘Plasma Knife’
KeelyNet Special Operations Command have “completed ongoing testing and field evaluation studies” of the next best thing, according to a Pentagon budget document. It’s a Plasma Knife which cuts through flesh with a “blade” of glowing ionized gas. But rather than being a weapon, the Plasma Knife is a surgical instrument that could save lives. Commandos often find themselves in remote areas without the luxury of medical backup, which is why they require their own emergency medical capability. And that’s where the Plasma Knife comes in. If you survive the massive tissue damage caused by a bullet or an improvised bomb, then the biggest immediate risk is bleeding to death. The Plasma Knife is a tool to stop bleeding. In a sense it goes right back to the old technique of cauterization , where you stop the bleeding by applying red-hot irons. Modern surgeons have electrocautery which uses an electrically-heated wire, for the same purpose. The more advanced version is radiosurgery, which replaces the wire with high-energy radio-frequency radiation which heats tissue directly. All of these work on the same basic principle of stopping bleeding by creating an impermeable layer of necrotic tissue. Or to put it another way, you melt the flesh the form a bandage. The necrotic – that is, dead – tissue is comprised of two layers, a porous outer layer in which all the moisture has been completely vaporized, and an impervious layer where proteins have been broken down but some water remains. The key thing is not to simply blast the bleeding wound with heat, as that literally burns away the flesh and makes the injury deeper. Energy has to be applied in a controlled fashion. The Plasma Knife resembles tools used for radiosurgery, but has the advantage that it produces plasma (hot ionised gas – not the liquid sort of plasma found in blood) which penetrates the outer porous layer of dead tissue without damaging it. In principle this means that more serious blood flow, such as that caused by large blood vessels being severed, can be stemmed without doing major damage. As the name suggests, the Plasma Knife can also be used as a surgical cutting instrument. As with laser and radiosurgery tools, it can be sterile even in field conditions. And it cauterizes and seals the incision as it goes. A normal medical Plasma Knife relies on mains power, but the commando version is described as being low-power and wearable, suggesting it has a separate power pack. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Ultracapacitor Bus Recharges At Each Stop
"A US company and its Chinese partner are piloting a bus powered by ultracapacitors in Washington DC. Ultracapacitors lack the capacity of regular batteries but are considerably cheaper and can be recharge completely in under a minute. Sinautec Automobile Technologies, based in Arlington, VA, and its Chinese partner, Shanghai Aowei Technology Development Company, have spent the past three years demonstrating the approach with 17 municipal buses on the outskirts of Shanghai. The executive director of Sinautec touts the energy efficiency of this approach: 'Even if you use the dirtiest coal plant on the planet [to charge an ultracapacitor], it generates a third of the carbon dioxide of diesel.'" - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Fortress Moon
KeelyNet Anyone with two brain cells to rub together had to wonder what was up with NASA bombing the moon last week. They were looking for water? Really? The entire surface of the moon is pitted with craters. They had to gouge out two more to look for water? Nobody bought it. The conspiracy theories sprouted instantly all over the Internet. One of the funniest is my friend Alan Cabal's, on this CounterPunch site, managing to link President Obama's Nobel to the deaths of two Jewish astronauts to the old saw about secret Nazi fortresses on the moon. (I think maybe Robert A. Heinlein was the first to expound that one, in his 1947 novel Rocket Ship Galileo.) Or it was alien moon bases they were bombing. Or it was to alter the moon's gravitational effect on earth's tides. Or to stop the gradual expansion of the moon's orbit, which they tell us is increasing at 3.8 centimeters a year. Or — this was as inevitable as the tides — it was yet another attempt to cover up the fact that the Apollo landings were faked. This is a classic example of the way the federal government actively encourages conspiracy theories to distract us rubes from whatever it's really up to. The Air Force let ufologists natter about the alien crash at Roswell for half a century as a handy distraction from what was really going on there. No doubt some large percentage of the UFOs sighted over the decades have been test flights of military aircraft in development. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Berlin ‘Green’ Brothel Offers Discounts to Cyclists
KeelyNet A brothel in Berlin has leapt on the “green” bandwagon by offering discounts to clients who can prove they arrived by public transport or bicycle. “Everyone’s a winner,” explained Regina Goetz, a former prostitute who runs the “Maison d’envie” (House of Desire) brothel in Berlin’s Prenzlauer Berg, a district in the former East Berlin. “The environment is a topic on everyone’s lips and it’s pretty difficult to park around here. So we came up with the idea of an ‘eco discount’ of five euros (Ł4.50) to anyone who leaves the car at home,” Ms Goetz said. “The crisis has slashed our turnover in half in the last year,” the 56-year-old said. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - New Impulse rocket engine could make trips to Mars realistic
Ion propulsion, discussed since the original Star Trek TV series, is now close to the point where it could be tested on a flight to the moon, says Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield. It would take about 39 days to reach Mars, compared to six months by conventional rocket power. Because Mars and Earth only pass close together every two years, space experts have always assumed a crew would have to travel one way, wait a year, then fly back the next time the planets were close together - raising huge problems for food, air and water storage. But ion drive could make a return trip possible during a single close approach of Earth and Mars. “It turns electrical power into thrust so that we can use solar energy” to power a spaceship, he said. The engine would accelerate a spaceship non-stop until it's halfway to Mars, producing a tiny stream of argon gas that it fires out the rear of the spacecraft. Then it turns the engine around and decelerates non-stop until reaching Mars. “You accelerate halfway, decelerate halfway,” he said. There are also plans to use the ion engine on the space station to counteract the slight drag from wisps of Earth's atmosphere. This drag makes the station slow down slightly (creating tiny amounts of gravity) and forces crews to burn fuel regularly to boost their orbit. Ad Astra says its first tests were successful, and it is now working with Nautel on a more powerful engine. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Jupiter's Moon Europa Has Enough Oxygen For Life
KeelyNet New research suggests that there is plenty of oxygen available in the subsurface ocean of Europa to support oxygen-based metabolic processes for life similar to that on Earth. In fact, there may be enough oxygen to support complex, animal-like organisms with greater oxygen demands than microorganisms. A model of Europa's interior, including a global ocean. If a 100 kilometer-deep ocean existed below the Europan ice shell, it would be 10 times deeper than any ocean on Earth and would contain twice as much water as Earth's oceans and rivers combined. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - PriceFalls.com - catch deals as they fall
Pricefalls.com is an online reverse auction site using the “Dutch Auction” method of entering your bid as prices fall in a steady decline. You can buy the item immediately at any point in the falling prices. The auction ends when a predetermined floor is reached. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Sound Effects you can capture or download
If you'd like to provide some sound effects while you read this blog, try this: Virtual Studio Audience Soundboard. Try playing different sounds at the same time. Use them on your friends, or add sounds to your videos from the download section.

KeelyNet
- Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Open Letter to Bill Maher on Vaccinations
Editor of 'Skeptic Magazine', Michael Shermer writes, "Years ago you invited me to appear as a fellow skeptic several times on your ABC show Politically Incorrect, and I have ever since shared your skepticism on so many matters important to both of us: creationism and intelligent design, religious supernaturalism and New Age paranormal piffle, 9/11 “truthers”, Obama “birthers”, and all manner of conspiratorial codswallop. On these matters, and many others, you rightly deserved the Richard Dawkins Award from Atheist Alliance International. However, I believe that when it comes to alternative medicine in general and vaccinations in particular you have fallen prey to the same cognitive biases and conspiratorial thinking that you have so astutely identified in others. In fact, the very principle of how vaccinations work is additional proof (as if we needed more) against the creationists that evolution happened and that natural selection is real: vaccinations work by tricking the body’s immune system into thinking that it has already had the disease for which the vaccination was given. Our immune system “adapts” to the invading pathogens and “evolves” to fight them, such that when it encounters a biologically similar pathogen (which itself may have evolved) it has in its armory the weapons needed to fight it. This is why many of us born in the 1950s and before may already have some immunity against the H1N1 flu because of its genetic similarity to earlier influenza viruses, and why many of those born after really should get vaccinated. Vaccinations are not 100% effective, nor are they risk free. But the benefits far outweigh the risks, and when communities in the U.S. and the U.K. in recent years have foregone vaccinations in large numbers, herd immunity is lost and communicable diseases have come roaring back. This is yet another example of evolution at work, but in this case it is working against us. (See www.sciencebasedmedicine.org for numerous articles answering every one of the objections to vaccinations.) - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Need to document your Accident? Try Accident Sketch
KeelyNet Here's a site that lets you draw a diagram of your traffic accident: Accident Sketch. Draw a perfect sketch of the accident online just with a few mouse clicks and add your sketch to your personal digital accident report. Including helpful advices for your settlement of claim. / Vehicles, streets, traffic signs, arrows, braking marks etc. can be dragged out of the accordion menu on the left side into the drawing area by pressing and holding the left mouse button. You can change the position of items by clicking once and holding down the left mouse button while dragging. All elements can be rotated by using the green point or by holding the right mouse button.. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - Remove Pet Hair With Rubber Gloves
There's no trick or gimmick with this tried and true method of pet hair removal. All you need is a pair of typical rubber gloves found in the cleaning aisle at your local grocer or big box store. Slide them on and you're set to get frisky with your sofa and car interior. After a good rub down (hubba hubba) the fur should lift and stick to the glove. Simply submerge your hands in water and the hair will unstick and float on top of the water for you to gather and dispose of. You can of course remove the excess fur without water, but we've always been fans of the quickest and easiest method possible, and from experience, I can say this works like a charm. - Full Article Source

10/21/09 - De-Stink Smelly Shoes With Cat Litter
To eliminate odors inside your shoe, simply fill a loose knit sock or some pantyhose with litter and tie it off. Work it into each shoe and allow to sit for 24 hours. The litter will help dry up the stinky bacteria that causes the smell, and it's likely a lot cheaper than powders and potions sold at big box stores (especially if you've already got it on hand). That's about all there is to it. Outdoors web site Trails.com has more details, so head to their instructions for the full low-down. Cat litter isn't just useful for your precious feline friends, of course—we've already shown you how it can be used to save your soaked cellphone. - Full Article Source

Mommy...
KeelyNet

10/18/09 - Autonomous Indoor Robocopter
"Researchers at MIT's Robust Robotics Group have developed a robotic helicopter capable of autonomously flying inside buildings or other GPS-denied environments. It has an on-board camera and a laser scanner that maps the local environment. The video talks about search-and-rescue and civil engineering applications, but it also brings somewhat scary reminders of Minority Report to my head. How long till I see one of these chasing me down a dark alley? The team's website has more videos showing earlier stages of the project." - Full Article Source

10/18/09 - A Step Closer To Cheap Nuclear Fusion and true OverUnity
KeelyNet KeelyNet
The Focus Fusion Society reports that the scientists and engineers at Lawrenceville Plasma Physics have finally built an operational Dense Plasma Focus device. While still at less than half power, they were able to achieve a pinch on their device. The small company that Eric Lerner started recently gathered enough funding to start a two-year study on the validity of his theory regarding fusion-inducing plasmoids. If the theory holds, the device will produce more electricity than it consumes. In contrast to the billions of dollars spent on Tokamak fusion (think ITER), LPP is conducting their research on a budget around a million dollars. Yet, if it works, it will provide nuclear fusion with much simpler equipment and much less cost. Eric Lerner and Focus Fusion have been discussed on Slashdot before." - Full Article Source

10/18/09 - Oath Keepers pledges to prevent dictatorship in United States
Depending on your perspective, the Oath Keepers are either strident defenders of liberty or dangerous peddlers of paranoia. Launched in March by Las Vegan Stewart Rhodes, Oath Keepers bills itself as a nonpartisan group of current and retired law enforcement and military personnel who vow to fulfill their oaths to the Constitution. More specifically, the group's members, which number in the thousands, pledge to disobey orders they deem unlawful, including directives to disarm the American people and to blockade American cities. By refusing the latter order, the Oath Keepers hope to prevent cities from becoming "giant concentration camps," a scenario the 44-year-old Rhodes says he can envision happening in the coming years. It's a Cold War-era nightmare vision with a major twist: The occupying forces in this imagined future are American, not Soviet. "The whole point of Oath Keepers is to stop a dictatorship from ever happening here," Rhodes, a former Army paratrooper and Yale-trained lawyer, said in an interview with the Review-Journal. "My focus is on the guys with the guns, because they can't do it without them. "We say if the American people decide it's time for a revolution, we'll fight with you." Oath Keepers is not preaching violence or government overthrow, Rhodes said. On the contrary, it is asking police and the military to lay down their arms in response to unlawful orders. The group's Web site, www.oathkeepers.org, features videos and testimonials in which supporters compare President Barack Obama's America to Adolf Hitler's Germany. They also liken Obama to England's King George III during the American Revolution. The homeland security report added that "disgruntled military veterans" might be vulnerable to recruitment by right-wing extremist groups. That warning was enough to make Rhodes feel paranoid. "They're accusing anybody who opposes Obama of being a racist or a potential terrorist," he said. "What they're saying is, 'We're coming after you.'" The motto of Oath Keepers: "Not on our watch!" The message Rhodes hears from the government: We're watching you. "When you believe in something, you have to do more than just pay it lip service," said Freeman, the group's Southern Nevada director and national peace officer liaison. "This is a crusade I believe in." Rhodes said he hopes Oath Keepers members think about the lawfulness of day-to-day orders they receive. For example, if a police officer feels he is being asked to do an illegal search of a home or vehicle, he should stand down. Rhodes eventually wants to create a legal defense fund for Oath Keepers who are disciplined by their employers for defying orders they deem unlawful or immoral. "The message to law enforcement is not to become a tool of oppression," he said. / From the Oath Keepers website - Ten Orders we will NOT OBEY because we will consider them unconstitutional (and thus unlawful) and immoral violations of the natural rights of the people. Such orders would be acts of war against the American people by their own government, and thus acts of treason. We will not make war against our own people. We will not commit treason. Recognizing that we each swore an oath to support and defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign and domestic, and affirming that we are guardians of the Republic, of the principles in our Declaration of Independence, and of the rights of our people... - Full Article Source

10/18/09 - A weird, though surprisingly well done take on Chemtrails vs Contrails
KeelyNet Remember the 1988 John Carpenter movie 'They Live'? Part science fiction thriller and part dark comedy, the film echoed contemporary fears of a declining economy, within a culture of greed and conspicuous consumption common among Americans in the 1980s. In They Live, the ruling class within the monied elite are in fact aliens managing human social affairs through the use of a signal on top of the tv broadcast that is concealing their appearance and subliminal messages in Mass media. Character George Nada accidentally picks up a pair of sunglasses, when he later dons the glasses for the first time, the world appears in shades of grey, with significant differences. He notices that a billboard now simply displays the word "Obey"; without them it advertises that Control Data Corporation is "creating a transparent computing environment." Another billboard (normally displaying "Come to the Caribbean" written above a lovely woman lying on a beach) now displays the text "Marry and Reproduce." He also sees that paper money bears the words "This is your God." All printed matter around him contains subliminal advertising. Additionally, he soon discovers that many people are actually aliens, who are human-looking except for skull-like faces. When the aliens realize he can see them for what they truly are, the police suddenly arrive. Nada escapes and steals a police shotgun; he eventually stumbles into a local bank filled with aliens. Upon entering he proclaims, "I have come here to chew bubblegum and kick ass.. and I'm all out of bubblegum." A shooting spree ensues and after killing many of them, one of the aliens sees him and disappears after twisting a dial on his wristwatch. / Thanks to KatMan for the link. - JWD - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Not dark energy, dark fluid
KeelyNet The simplest way of explaining the universe's acceleration is to invoke a cosmological constant, originally proposed by Einstein to allow the universe to remain the same size in the presence of matter. This describes a universe filled with uniform, outward-pushing energy. But there are other possible explanations for acceleration. One idea is that the entire universe exists on a membrane, or brane, floating inside an extra dimension. While matter will be confined to three dimensions, gravity could be leaking into this extra dimension. When the universe becomes large enough, this gravity could interact with matter in the brane, to produce acceleration on large scales. A deviation could also be a sign that dark energy is a more complex "fluid" that exerts varying pressures in different directions. The snag is that telling the difference between a more exotic form of dark energy and a modification to our understanding of gravity could be tricky. "If we were to detect a departure," says cosmologist Alessandra Silvestri of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, we might not be able to tell whether there is a flaw in general relativity or just evidence that dark energy is "some sort of fancy fluid". - Full Article Source and check out the theories of Osborne Reynolds where the Aether is a dilatant fluid at;

UFOs, Osborne Reynolds, and the One Wind
Osborne Reynolds' Submechanics of the Universe
A structured context for: matter, energy, space, time and PSI phenomena

Demonstration of Dilatancy in a Toy
Wacky Wall Crawlers - Patent 3,601,923

In 1968 while employed as a research engineer at the Franklin Institute Research Laboratories in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, I invented a device which consisted of a dilatant fluid enclosed and sealed in a rubber sack. At the time I had no idea what dilatancy was, so I asked some of my associates in the physics department, got the basic vocabulary and set off to the Franklin Institute Library to do some research. This was the beginning of my education in rheology and the work of Osborne Reynolds. Also in 1968, totally unknown to me, the Osborne Reynolds Centennial Celebration was being conducted at the University of Manchester.

Whilst researching the prior art in dilatancy, I was surprised and intrigued to find, in a book on rheology (4, p. 4), that Osborne Reynolds' had based an entire theory of the universe on a dilatant medium. I continued to pursue my applications and subsequently received a patent on a toy (5) and later, through the US Navy, I was granted a patent on an impact absorber based on the same principle (6). The rheologically dilatant suspension used in my patents has a critical shear rate which can be kinaesthetically perceived on handling it. Below a critical shear rate it behaves as a liquid, above this rate it behaves as a solid. There seemed to be some analogy between this critical flow rate and relativistic phenomena at the speed of light.

"If the elastic container 10 is made up in the form of a snake or reptile, as shown in FIG. 15, having a head portion 68 and a body portion 70, a child can amuse himself and acquire tactile sensitivity in many ways. Thus he can elongate all or portions of the snake rapidly and form a plurality of lumps as in FIG. 9 which ultimately will become absorbed and when released and dropped on a surface will twist and wiggle until it returns fully to its original shape and form."

Speed is Everything

10/29/09 - iRobot's Soft Morphing Blob 'Bot Takes Its First Steps
The Pentagon has unveiled a new robot that's most a blob of goo. Called the "chemical robot," or ChemBot, it moves by changing its shape, by inflating and deflating different areas. Researchers say the research could lead to robots that can seep through cracks, and help rescue people trapped in collapsed buildings. / It gets around by way of a process called “jamming,” in which material can transition between semiliquid and solid states with only a slight change in volume. In ChemBot’s case, a flexible silicone skin encapsulates a series of pockets containing a mix of air and loosely packed particles. When air is removed from the compartments, the skin attempts to equalize the pressure differential by constricting the particles, which shift slightly to fill the void left by the evacuated air.(via http://www.therawfeed.com/) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Maple Seeds Inspire New Monocopter Flying Machine
Clark School Aerospace Engineering students solve 60-year-old design dilemma by mimicking Maple tree seeds. Kids call 'em "helicopters" -- maple seeds that rotate as they fall to the ground. They're actually monocopters because they have one blade. And, for 60 years, they've been an engineering dilemma. Graduate student Evan Ulrich is the primary inventor of a new flying machine modeled after the maple tree seed. It works. Ulrich demonstrated several of his devices to a gaggle of reporters on an engineering plaza in College Park, today. Ulrich placed the awkward looking device on the ground, walked back to his remote radio controller, and began turning controls. The machine vibrated. Its single propeller started turning, and, woosh, the gizmo was up in the air and flying. Ulrich, who will earn his doctorate in May, says the prototypes cost about $500 each. But the flying monocopter might turn into a $100 toy with enough mass production. How does it feel to fly it? "It's a blast," says inventor Ulrich. Two patent applications have been filed, and Ulrich envisions the toy version of this monocopter being in production within months. In the 1950s, researchers first tried to create an unmanned aerial vehicle that could mimic a maple seed's spiraling fall. Ever since, their attempts have been foiled by instability, resulting in a lack of control over the tiny (less than one meter) vehicles, which were easily knocked off course by wind. As recently as June 2009, this was considered as an open challenge for engineers. The Clark School students have solved the steering problem and provided a solution that allows the device to take off from the ground and hover, as well as perform controlled flight after its initial fall to the ground after being deployed from an aircraft. The device can also begin to hover during its initial descent, or after being launched by hand. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Electrisitree solar/wind energy in One
The growing popularity of solar panels — which capture renewable energy generated from the sun — should lead to new forms of solar panels that are more attractive than the common gray, flat panels seen on top of buildings, Strang said. His resulting invention, the Electrisitree, is the answer to that problem, he said. The fronds on the artificial palm tree, when put outside, would absorb light just like solar panels, said Strang. “They’re more aesthetically pleasing,” Strang said of the product. Eventually, Strang said, he plans to develop a version of the Electrisitree that would have spinning branches, so the machine would also function as a turbine, to capture wind power. Strang estimates one eight-foot tall tree would cost homeowners roughly $15,000 to install. One tree generates roughly 80 watts of power, according to Strang. It would take eight to power a 1,200-square-foot home, Strang said. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Competitors strive to create new life-forms
KeelyNet Building microscopic critters via genetic tinkering was confined to the world's most sophisticated laboratories a generation ago. But with more powerful computers and cheaper equipment, it is within reach of students at high schools, community colleges and universities, hundreds of whom are competing this year to create the coolest new organism on the planet. The International Genetically Engineered Machine (IGEM) competition, which will be held Halloween weekend at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass., is built on the premise that life can be broken down into a warehouse of off-the-shelf, interchangeable parts and reassembled into creatures that have never existed. Adherents call this kind of science synthetic biology. Critics call it scary. "It's sold as, 'it's light, it's fun, it's hip, it's green.' It's not being sold as risky, as untested. One of the big concerns is that kids are being taught that DNA is a computer code, and you can program biological organisms the same way you can program a computer. I think that's going to prove to be a bad analogy." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Air Conditioned Bed Sheets to save Energy
AIR-CONDITIONED bed sheets, a contraption devised by a Tamworth inventor, have won first prize in a national competition to find the best new energy-saving products. The energy-saving sheets are designed to reduce the cost of cooling homes in warm climates at night. They work by blowing chilled air into the bed space either from a sort of leaky lilo placed above or under your top sheet or in your duvet. This would cool your top sheet or duvet. Alternatively, chilled air can be blown directly into the empty space in your mattress and this will cool your bottom sheet. The sheets have been patented, but they are still in the invention phase and have not yet been produced. Mike is on board with the company European Thermodynamics to produce the sheets, he just needs an investor to help fund production. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Creepy Human Gait Robot
Boston Dynamics is at it again. This time, they’ve created a creepy biped with a natural gait. It may look very similar to BigDog, because it really is almost the same system. Named PETMAN, this biped system is being designed to help test chemical protection suits. This bot can stress the suit by walking, running, and even crawling in a room filled with poison gas. Not only can PETMAN walk, run, and crawl, but it can also sweat and change its temperature. That’s pretty cool. Like BigDog, the most impressive part is when they give it a shove and it recovers with a motion that seems almost organic. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Using Plasma to produce Nanoparticles
Plasma is like a gas, but many of its atoms have been stripped of an electron or two. These positively charged atoms swim about in a crackling-hot sea of negatively charged loose electrons, making plasmas great electrical conductors. Scientists have harnessed it to make welding torches, fluorescent lights and bright, sharp big-screen TVs, as well as those glass novelty globes full of snaking purple current that make your hair stand on end when you touch them. But plasma can do more, much more, and Idaho National Laboratory's Peter Kong is giving the world a glimpse of its true potential. Kong, technical lead for plasma processing at INL, has built a career of putting plasma to work. He's using it to mass-produce nanoparticles, a project that in August received $1 million in federal stimulus funding. He's also employing plasma to find ways to store hydrogen efficiently, and he'll soon start a project using plasma to convert natural gas, coal and heavy oil to gasoline and diesel. These last two efforts could help the United States break its addiction to foreign oil and, perhaps, to fossil fuels altogether. "I found plasma to be a very interesting subject," he says, "one that could be applied to a lot of areas other than welding, cutting or spraying." One of these areas is the production of nanoparticles, bits of matter tens of thousands of times smaller than the diameter of a human hair. Because nanoparticles are so tiny, a high percentage of their constituent atoms are on their surfaces rather than hidden away inside. Surface interactions thus dominate the lives of nanoparticles, and as a result, nano-sized specks of a particular substance often have different physical and chemical properties than larger chunks. Scientists are just beginning to exploit nanoparticles, but they hold great promise in many applications, including anti-microbial and cancer-fighting drugs, stronger, corrosion-resistant materials and more efficient solar panels, fuel cells and batteries. But nanoparticles can be difficult and expensive to make. Kong is hoping to change that with his unique Plasma Nanoparticle Fabricator, a man-sized conglomeration of cables and shiny steel that looks a bit like a robotic squid. Sand-size grains of material fed into the PNF get vaporized by a plasma arc exceeding 12,000 degrees Celsius, twice as hot as the surface of the sun. As the vapor exits the reactor's processing zone, the gas cools down so fast—a rate of 1 million degrees per second—that its atoms have very little time to glom together. Each atom clumps with only a few others, forming nanoparticles. Other nanoparticle-production methods grind raw materials down, burn them up using fossil fuels or dunk them in various chemical baths. But Kong's PNF is a step above. It makes high-quality (very small and relatively uniform) nanoparticles more cheaply and can handle a wider range of raw materials. And, because it converts 100 percent of its feedstock to nanoparticles, it generates no byproducts. Other conventional plasma reactors can't come close to this conversion rate, which the PNF achieves with a much longer plasma arc. Also contributing are the higher, more uniform temperatures in the PNF's processing zones, and the fact that raw materials remain in these zones for longer periods of time. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Gyrowheel: Revolutionary Way To Learn To Ride A Bicycle
The Gyrowheel has a fast spinning disk inside that can spin for up to three hours on a full charge of its built-in rechargeable NiMH battery. The spinning disk is completely enclosed for safety. The Gyrowheel replaces the front wheel of the child’s bike, and the spinning disk inside keeps the bike upright and stable, even when a wobbling child is aboard. The Gyrowheel has three speeds, with the highest speed being the most stable. At this speed the wheel is able to resist knocks and shoves even when it is stationary, and without a bicycle attached can travel upright, letting itself down gently when it stops. The gyroscope gives the bicycle high stability even at very slow speeds. As the novice rider gathers more confidence, the speed can be decreased, until the child is riding unaided. The Gyrowheel has been tested on over a hundred children, and all learned to ride very quickly without needing training wheels. Daniella Reichstetter, the CEO of Gyrobike, the Gyrowheel’s developer, explained that the old system of training wheels did nothing more than stop the child falling over, and could start the novice off with bad habits and riding techniques that had to be unlearned when the training wheels were removed. The wheel was originally intended to teach someone how to ride a unicycle, but Reichstetter and her team soon realized the device could be used equally well on a young child’s bicycle to help them learn more safely and quickly. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Carbon Nanotubes Make Tomatoes Grow Faster
Tomato seeds exposed to nanoparticles in the form of carbon nanotubes that are only 1/50,000 the width of a human hair, sprouted sooner and grew faster in what researchers are describing as a step toward the “goals of nanoagriculture.” - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - First Hyperlens For Sound Waves Created
KeelyNet Ultrasound and underwater sonar devices could “see” a big improvement, thanks to development of the world’s first acoustic hyperlens. Created by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), the acoustic hyperlens provides an eightfold boost in the magnification power of sound-based imaging technologies. Clever physical manipulation of the imaging sound waves enables the hyperlens to resolve details smaller than one sixth the length of the waves themselves, bringing into view much smaller objects and features than can be detected using today’s technologies. The key to this success is the capturing of information contained in evanescent waves, which carry far more details and higher resolution than propagating waves but are typically bound to the vicinity of the source and decay much too quickly to be captured by a conventional lens. “We have successfully carried out an experimental demonstration of an acoustic hyperlens that magnifies sub-wavelength objects by gradually converting evanescent waves into propagating waves,” said Xiang Zhang, a principal investigator with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and director of the Nano-scale Science and Engineering Center at the University of California, Berkeley. “Our acoustic hyperlens relies on straightforward cutoff-free propagation and achieves deep subwavelength resolution with low loss over a broad frequency bandwidth.” Zhang and his co-authors fashioned their acoustic hyperlens from 36 brass fins arranged in the shape of a hand-held fan. Each fin is approximately 20 centimeters long and three millimeters thick. The fins, embedded in the brass plate from which they were milled, extend out from an inner radius of 2.7 centimeters to an outer radius of 21.8 centimeters, and span 180 degrees in the angular direction. “As a result of the large ratio between the inner and outer radii, our acoustic hyperlens compresses a significant portion of evanescent waves into the band of propagating waves so that the image obtained is magnified by a factor of eight,” says co-author Fok, a graduate student in Zhang’s lab. “We chose brass as the material for the fins because it has a density about 7,000 times that of air, a large ratio that is needed to achieve the strong anisotropy required for a flat dispersion of the sound waves.” / (This is PURE KEELY! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Getting bugged by e-mail subpoenas
KeelyNet What if Congress proposed that every telephone call made or received in the United States should be recorded, just in case something anyone said might later be relevant in a legal proceeding? You'd be outraged. I'd be outraged. Those on the left, on the right and on the yellow line down the middle of the political road would see it as an unconscionable invasion of privacy and march on Capitol Hill with pitchforks and torches to be sure such a proposal never passed. If the law wants to put our conversations under surveillance, it had better first prove to a judge that it has a very good reason for doing so. So where is our outrage over the way judges and lawyers now are often able to go back in time and retrospectively listen in on our e-mail and text exchanges? These exchanges are often as loose and unguarded as actual spoken conversations -- sloppy, blunt, intimate, haphazard -- but because they usually end up living on some disk or server somewhere whether we want them to or not, the courts, with a little effort, can go back and, in effect, eavesdrop... Just as it would be a shame if we had to conduct all our private conversations as though a judge and jury were listening, it's become a shame that the cautious person must make that very assumption when conducting private e-conversations via instant message, text or mail services. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Alcohol Activates Cellular Changes That Make Tumor Cells Spread
Alcohol consumption has long been linked to cancer and its spread, but the underlying mechanism has never been clear. Now, researchers at Rush University Medical Center have identified a cellular pathway that may explain the link. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Highway Hypnosis
KeelyNet Highway hypnosis is a mental state in which the person can drive a truck or automobile great distances, responding to external events in the expected manner with no recollection of having consciously done so. In this state the driver's conscious mind is apparently fully focused elsewhere, with seemingly direct processing of the masses of information needed to drive safely. 'Highway Hypnosis' is just one manifestation of a relatively commonplace experience, theoretically where the conscious and subconscious minds appear to concentrate on different things; workers performing simple and repetitive tasks and people deprived of sleep are likely to experience similar symptoms. Therefore, it is a sort of subconscious "driving mode." / (Reminds me of how chickens are hypnotized by drawing a chalk line and putting their beak on it so they go into a catatonic trance...see my 3 eBooks on Hypnotic Phenomena and how to do it. - JWD) - Full Article Source and Hypnosis eBooks 3 for $24.95 on CD

10/29/09 - Mind control via serial port
KeelyNet Zibri] found a very simple method for using brain waves as a controller via a DB9 serial port. He’s using Uncle Milton’s Force Trainer which we saw yesterday in the brain controlled Arduino. In that project the Arduino tapped into the LEDs and interfaced those signals with a computer via USB. This time the connection was made using an RS-232 transceiver to pass data from the programming header inside of the toy’s base unit to a computer over the serial port. Tapping into the programming header has a lot more potential and should be more reliable than sniffing logic out of LED connections. [Zibri] has written an application to display the received data but it doesn’t look like he’s made the code available for download. Apparently he tipped us off about a week ago. We recall seeing this submission but as you can tell it’s a little bit light on the detail. So if you want your tips to be at the front of the line, make sure you do what you can to fill us in on all the details of your project. At our request [Zibri] provided a picture of the PCB from the Force Trainer’s base unit. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - The Force Trainer brings Star Wars to Life
KeelyNet Ever wanted to use the force to move objects with your brain? Will it may not be possible without the use of technology, but where there’s a will, there’s a way. The Force Trainer comes with a headset that uses brain waves to allow players to manipulate a sphere within a clear 10-inch-tall training tower. The wireless headset reads your brain activity, in a simplified version of EEG medical tests, and the circuitry translates it to physical action. If you focus well enough, the training sphere will rise in the tower. A state of deep concentration is needed to achieve a Force-full effect. Star Wars sound effects and audio clips are emitted from the base unit to cue progress to the next level (from Padawan to Jedi). The Force Trainer is expected to sell for between $90 and $100. / Scientists call the technology BCI, or Brain Computer Interface, and more sensitive, medical-grade versions are used to help amputees move artificial limbs and victims of paralysis communicate using a computer and software that reacts thought. The Force Trainer, expected to sell for about $120, is not medical-grade hardware, but it uses a headset to monitor the brain, and then transmits a signal to a base that features a fan and a ball in a tube. The headset is calibrated to sense beta waves, a specific type of brain waves associated with concentration. When you focus, the headset reads the electrical pattern from inside your head and sends a signal to a microchip that switches on the fan in the base unit and levitates the pingpong in a clear tube. The more intense the focus and concentration, the faster the fan spins and the quicker the ball rises. When concentration is broken or weak, the ball drops. A computer chip programmed with the voice of Yoda the Jedi master guides users through several increasingly different levels of control. Another mind toy, Mattel’s Mind Flex, uses the same mind-bending technology to guide a ball through a series of obstacles. It will be available in the fall. / The toy company Uncle Milton brings you closer than ever to the Force with its Star Wars Force Trainer. As part of its new series of Star Wars science products unveiled at the 2009 NY Toy Fair, the Force Trainer will help budding Jedis learn to master their thoughts and channel their own powers of the Force. The Force Trainer comes with a headset and base unit. Once the user places the headset on, this component captures brain signals and sends that information to the base unit which controls a floating ball, or Training Sphere, similar to the one found in the first Star Wars movie (episode IV). The more the user can focus their mind on something, the higher the Training Sphere will float within a clear tube chamber. To control the height of the ball, the user has to control the intensity of their brain activity, a challenging balance between active concentration and mental rest. The voice of Yoda helps guide the user through mastery of all 15 levels of game play. The Force Trainer will become available this coming August and will cost just under $130. - Full Article Source and Star Wars Shop - Force Trainer $129.99

10/29/09 - (Colored) Lights Help Injured Mice Walk Again
KeelyNet "Researchers have been able to affect the brains of lab mice using light. Working in a new field called Optogenetics (optical stimulation plus genetic engineering), scientists injected lab mice with genes that can stimulate or inhibit neural activity based on the color of the light they're exposed to, and can be targeted to infect only on certain cell types. Additionally, another gene has been added to make neurons glow green when firing, allowing two-way communication between a brain and a machine." - Full Article Source and Spectro-Chrome Color Therapy and Uses of Color and Dinshah Health Society

10/29/09 - Swiss Experimenter Breeds Swarm Intelligence
"Researchers simulated evolution with multiple generations of food-seeking robots in a new study of artificial swarm intelligence. 'Under some conditions, sophisticated communication evolved,' says one researcher. And in a more recent study, the swarms of bots didn't just evolve cooperative strategies — they also evolved the ability to deceive. ('Forget zombies,' joked one commenter. 'This is the real threat.') 'The study of artificial swarm intelligence provides insight into the nature of intelligence in general, and offers an interesting perspective on the nature of Darwinian selection, competition, and cooperation.' And there's also some cool video of the bots in action." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Clean Smells Promote Ethical Behavior
"The researchers see implications for workplaces, retail stores and other organizations that have relied on traditional surveillance and security measures to enforce rules. Perhaps the findings could be applied at home, too, Liljenquist said with a smile. 'Could be that getting our kids to clean up their rooms might help them clean up their acts, too.' The study titled "The Smell of Virtue" was unusually simple and conclusive. Participants engaged in several tasks, the only difference being that some worked in unscented rooms, while others worked in rooms freshly spritzed with Windex." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Nigerian "Scam Police" Shut Down 800 Web Sites
KeelyNet "Nigerian police, in what is named Operation 'Eagle Claw,' have shut down 800 scam web sites and arrested members of 18 syndicates behind the fraudulent scam sites. Reports on Breitbart.com and Pointblank give details on the busts. The investigation was done in cooperation with Microsoft to help develop smart technology software capable of detecting fraudulent emails. From Breitbart: 'When operating at full capacity, within the next six months, the scheme, dubbed "Eagle Claw," should be able to forewarn around a quarter of million potential victims.'" (Give these guys a raise! - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - New Optomechanical Crystal Allows Confinement of Light and Sound
"Physicists and engineers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have developed a nanoscale crystal that traps both light and sound. The interaction of light quanta (photons) and sound quanta (phomons) are so strong that they produce significant mechanical vibrations. 'Indeed, Painter points out, the interactions between sound and light in this device—dubbed an optomechanical crystal—can result in mechanical vibrations with frequencies as high as tens of gigahertz, or 10 billion cycles per second. Being able to achieve such frequencies, he explains, gives these devices the ability to send large amounts of information, and opens up a wide array of potential applications—everything from lightwave communication systems to biosensors capable of detecting (or weighing) a single macromolecule. It could also, Painter says, be used as a research tool by scientists studying nanomechanics. "These structures would give a mass sensitivity that would rival conventional nanoelectromechanical systems because light in these structures is more sensitive to motion than a conventional electrical system is."'" - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - "2012" a Miscalculation; Actual Calendar Ends 2220
KeelyNet "News is spreading quickly here that scientists writing in a popular science periodical (Dutch) have debunked the 2012 date (google translation linked) featuring so prominently in doomsday predictions/speculation across the web. On 2012-12-21, the sun will appear where you would normally be able to see the 'galactic equator' of the Milky Way; an occurrence deemed special because it happens 'only' once every 25.800 years, on the winter solstice. However, even if you ignore the fact that there is no actual galactic equator, just an observed one, and that the visual effect is pretty much the same for an entire decade surrounding that date, there are major problems with the way the Maya Calendar is being read by doomsday prophets." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Tesla Roadster Breaks Distance Record For Electric Car
"The CEO of an Australian ISP has driven his Tesla Roadster into the record books, completing 501km on a single electric charge in the 2009 Global Green Challenge — beating the Roadster's official specifications, which rate the all-electric sports car as being capable of a maximum of 390km (242mph) per charge. The previous record was held by another Roadster in the 387km Rallye Monte Carlo d'Energies Alternatives in April this year. In a race specifically designed for alternative energy vehicles (such as hydrogen and electricity), the Roadster was the only vehicle to complete the entire course. Though to be fair, that race course was a mixture of twists, turns and hills." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Russia Develops Spaceship With Nuclear Engine
KeelyNet "The Russian Federal Space Agency Roscosmos has developed a design for a piloted spacecraft powered by a nuclear engine, the head of the agency said on Wednesday. 'The project is aimed at implementing large-scale space exploration programs,' Anatoly Perminov said at a meeting of the commission on the modernization of the Russian economy. He added that the development of Megawatt-class nuclear space power systems (MCNSPS) for manned spacecraft was crucial for Russia if the country wanted to maintain a competitive edge in the space race, including the exploration of the Moon and Mars." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Study Says US Needs Fewer? Science Students
'It's an article of faith: the United States needs more native-born students in science and other technical fields. But a new paper by sociologists at the Urban Institute and Rutgers University contradicts the notion of a shrinking supply of native-born talent in the United States. In fact, the supply has actually remained steady over the past 30 years, the researchers conclude, while the highest-performing students in the pipeline are opting out of science and engineering in greater numbers than in the past, suggesting that the threat to American economic competitiveness comes not from inadequate science training in school and college but from a lack of incentives that would make science and technology careers attractive. Cranking out even more science graduates, according to the researchers, does not give corporations any incentive to boost wages for science/tech jobs, which would be one way to retain the highest-performing students.' - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Auto parts makers target new markets
KeelyNet In reaction to the auto meltdown, Canadian firms are looking at aerospace. mining, alternative energy producers and even lawn mowers. “We just know it's not good to have your eggs in one basket,” says Marty Solcz, executive vice-president and chief operating officer of the privately held company. The automotive meltdown over the past year has delivered a blaring wakeup call to Canada's auto parts makers – the need to diversify. The near failures of General Motors Corp. and Chrysler LLC sent shock waves through the North American parts industry as plummeting vehicle production battered business for many companies. Eager to insulate themselves from any further deterioration in the sector, parts companies are now hitching their fortunes to broader industrial areas by tapping into everything from solar and wind energy technology to consumer products, aerospace and mining equipment. Auto production cutbacks have put an end to an era when simply shipping to assembly plants in Ontario and the U.S. Midwest was enough. One such program is to produce power conversion units for Stirling Energy Systems, which builds solar dishes that convert the sun's energy to electrical power. Stirling is supplying a solar farm in the Mojave Desert and will begin manufacturing 100 of its SunCatcher units a day next year. Tapping the expertise of auto parts makers on such projects makes sense, notes Jeff Collins, vice-president of global supply chain for Stirling, which is in Scottsdale, Ariz. “From a buyer perspective, there is no industry like the auto industry in terms of taking a concept, assisting the customer in developing the concept, incorporating ideas like design for manufacturability, design for assembly [and] design for serviceability,” Mr. Collins says. The contract, which will generate $200-million in revenue annually for Linamar, involves more than a supplier shipping a part, he says. “It's tapping into their engineering capability, their knowledge of manufacturing, their knowledge of their supply chain and their thinking about how to assemble this in high volume.” Linamar has set up a so-called skunk works team that will do research and development into new products and processes at the technology centre the company opened in Guelph last month. In another move to tap the auto parts industry's expertise, Stirling has sourced the reflective surface in the SunCatcher's 11.6-metre-in-diameter parabolic dish to metal basher Tower Automotive LLC. Toronto-based Martinrea, which competes against Tower for auto maker contracts, is using its expertise in metal forming to find new customers. “You've got a stamping press, it doesn't really care what it's stamping,” says chief operating officer Nick Orlando. “If you want to stamp parts for air conditioners or parts for washing machines, refrigerators, stoves, it really doesn't matter.” (You see this Jim R.? - JWD) - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - 'Younger wife' for marital bliss
The secret to a happy marriage for men is choosing a wife who is smarter and at least five years younger than you, say UK experts. These pairings are more likely to go the distance, particularly if neither has been divorced in the past, according to the Bath University team. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - The Sex-Housework Link
KeelyNet Housework may seem like the ultimate romance-killer. But guess what? A new study shows that for husbands and wives alike, the more housework you do, the more often you are likely to have sex with your spouse. Earlier studies have hinted at this connection for men; the sight of a husband mopping the floor or doing dishes sparks affection in the hearts of many wives. But the more-housework-equals-more-sex link for wives, documented in a study of 6,877 married couples published online recently in the Journal of Family Issues, is a surprise. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - That money is washing away
There's a growing public workforce, retiring early but living longer while drawing benefits. Do the math. The basic problem is that pension funds created to finance retirement benefits for thousands of public employees -- teachers, police officers, firefighters, and state, city and county workers of every description -- lack sufficient funds to meet their obligations. The result could be sharp reductions in future benefits, significant tax increases, or both. In 1950, about two-and-a-half times as many Americans were employed in manufacturing as in government -- 15 million in manufacturing, 6 million in government. Today, governments have 22.5 million employees, while manufacturing has 13.4 million. No state has added either construction or manufacturing employees in the past recessionary year. But 32 states have added government employees. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Cash for Clunkers Tab: $24,000 Per Vehicle
KeelyNet This summer's so-called Cash for Clunkers program cost taxpayers $24,000 per vehicle sold, according to an analysis by Edmunds.com. Nearly 690,000 vehicles were sold during the Cash for Clunkers program, officially known as the Car Allowance Rebate System (CARS), but Edmunds.com analysts indicate that only 125,000 of the sales were incremental. The rest of the sales would have happened anyway. Analysts divided three billion dollars by 125,000 vehicles to arrive at the average $24,000 per vehicle sold. The average transaction price in August was $26,915 minus an average cash rebate of $1,667. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Tintii Gives Colorful Boost to People and Objects in Your Photos
KeelyNet Windows/Mac/Linux: If you're a fan of photos that are desaturated save for an interesting burst of color left behind—often a vibrant one like a yellow flower or red carpet—Tintii makes it easy to play with the technique. Tintii is available as a stand-alone tool, the one we're reviewing here, and as a plugin for Photoshop and Paint Shop Pro. The stand-alone version is free to try out the application, activating the plugins costs $16. For casual use however the stand-alone version is more than adequate for tinkering and experimenting with your photos. The sample photo in the screenshot above only took a matter of seconds to tinker with before we arrived at a pleasing outcome. Tintii has a host of settings which are probably best played with to see their full effects. You can adjust the decay and edge parameters for both saturation and hue, increase the number of color detections—it starts with the basic primary colors but you can increase from there activating and deactivating colors within the photo's palette. Finally you can play with the channel mixer to further push and tweak the colors. Tintii is available as a free stand-alone tool, registering the plugins is $16. Tintii is available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - UN investigator warns US on use of drones
A U.N. human rights investigator warned the United States Tuesday that its use of unmanned warplanes to carry out targeted executions may violate international law. Philip Alston said that unless the Obama administration explains the legal basis for targeting particular individuals and the measures it is taking to comply with international humanitarian law which prohibits arbitrary executions, "it will increasingly be perceived as carrying out indiscriminate killings in violation of international law." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Faster Maintenance with Augmented Reality
KeelyNet In the not-too-distant future, it might be possible to slip on a pair of augmented-reality (AR) goggles instead of fumbling with a manual while trying to repair a car engine. Instructions overlaid on the real world would show how to complete a task by identifying, for example, exactly where the ignition coil was, and how to wire it up correctly. A new AR system developed at Columbia University starts to do just this, and testing performed by Marine mechanics suggests that it can help users find and begin a maintenance task in almost half the usual time. A user wears a head-worn display, and the AR system provides assistance by showing 3-D arrows that point to a relevant component, text instructions, floating labels and warnings, and animated, 3-D models of the appropriate tools. An Android-powered G1 smart phone attached to the mechanic's wrist provides touchscreen controls for cueing up the next sequence of instructions. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Software That Fixes Itself
Martin Rinard, a professor of computer science at MIT, is unabashed about the ultimate goal of his group's research: "delivering an immortal, invulnerable program." When a potentially harmful vulnerability is discovered in a piece of software, it takes nearly a month on average for human engineers to come up with a fix and to push the fix out to affected systems, according to a report issued by security company Symantec in 2006. Rinard's group hopes that its new software, called ClearView, will speed this process up, making software significantly more resilient against failure or attack. ClearView works without assistance from humans and without access to a program's underlying source code (an often proprietary set of instructions that defines how a piece of software will behave). Instead, the system monitors the behavior of a binary: the form the program takes in order to execute instructions on a computer's hardware. By observing a program's normal behavior and assigning a set of rules, ClearView detects certain types of errors, particularly those caused when an attacker injects malicious input into a program. When something goes wrong, ClearView detects the anomaly and identifies the rules that have been violated. It then comes up with several potential patches designed to force the software to follow the violated rules. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Insecurity not education determines church attendance
KeelyNet The long-standing theory has been that the higher educated someone is the less religious he will be. But new research in 60 countries proves otherwise. It is economic security that leaves churches empty. "Higher educated people rely more on facts and less on beliefs that can't be validated or are clearly false. Or at least that's the theory," Van Tubergen says. "But that's not what we've seen." Why not, he can't say. "That's not what we investigated, but we have a hunch. Other research has shown that highly educated people are indeed less religious. But at the same time they tend to be more actively involved in political parties, associations and thus also in churches. Less educated people are more religious, but less active about it. There is a higher rate of churchgoers amongst educated believers than low-skilled believers." The two other elements of modernisation can be explained: economic (in)security and the nature of social relationships. "Economic uncertainty has enormous impact on church attendance. In countries with large socio-economic inequality, the rich often go to church because they too could lose everything tomorrow, as was clear from the dramatic collapse of Enron and Lehman Brothers." Religiosity is also strongly influenced by the social environment, says Van Tubergen. "There have to be parents, neighbours or fellow villagers who say 'let's go' or 'why have I not seen you in church on Sunday?' Whether your friends are practising, what your teachers tell you and how your future partner feels about it are major influences. People who grow up in a religious environment often remain very religious." But changes in life can change that pattern, such as moving to a city and decreasing social control as a result of that. People who do so are more likely to become detached from their religion. On the other hand, religious communities tend to be very close-knit and children often remain in the community," Ruiter says. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Deep brain stimulation eases tics in Tourette's syndrome
Deep brain stimulation, already used for treating Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and dystonia, can ease the tics and other symptoms associated with Tourette's syndrome, British researchers reported today in the journal Neurology. Tourette's is a congenital neuropsychiatric disease affecting an estimated 1% of the population. It is characterized by physical tics, such as eye blinking, shoulder shrugging and head-and-shoulder jerking. It is also marked by vocal outbursts, many of which are obscene, providing great embarrassment. Sufferers often also have obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, anxiety or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. There is no cure for Tourette's and no medication that works in all patients. Deep brain stimulation involves embedding electrodes deep in the brain--often called a brain pacemaker--and applying a minute electrical current to specific areas of the brain, depending on the condition being treated. Its underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. Isolated case reports have suggested that the technique might be useful in Tourette's, so Dr. Andrea Cavanna of the University of Birmingham and her colleagues decided to perform a formal study. They treated 18 patients, with an average age of 30, who also had obsessive-compulsive disorder and who did not respond to other forms of therapy. Three of the patients were lost to follow-up. But the other 15, who were followed for two years, had an average of 52% fewer tics and a 26% to 33% improvement in the symptoms of OCD, depression and anxiety. The treatment did not interfere with their cognitive abilities. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Halloween props: Servo eyes (watch the video)
KeelyNet If you’re wanting to spice up a Jack-o-lantern, why not give it some spooky eyes that will look around? [todbot] shows us how to set this up using an Arduino and 3 servos. His rig uses a hobby servo to control the entire head’s orientation and a smaller servo for each eye’s movement. Their motion is random, but quite convincing. He has them all stuck together with popsicle sticks, but you would probably move the location of the large servo to rotate the entire pumpkin, or whatever other prop you put it all in. You can download the Arduino sketch and give it a try your self. We might suggest building a simple rack and pinion rig to rotate both eyeballs with a single servo. / (I saw these at the Exploratorium in San Francisco several years ago, but their's had a tracking sensor so the eyes FOLLOWED YOU! - JWD) - Full Article Source and Video - Scary Shifty Servo Eyeballs and Halloween prop: glowing spooky LED eyes

10/29/09 - The Underground Market of Sperm Donors
KeelyNet Those "in need" are single women, lesbian couples, and married couples challenged by male infertility who can't afford the expense -- or in some countries, who don't have the "right" social status -- for traditional sperm banks. Trent is an independent contractor in a growing online gray market of free sperm donors. This market now includes Craigslist ads, Yahoo groups with names like Free Sperm Donors or Spermdonorneed, and websites like DIY Baby, the Free Fertility Clinic, and Feelingbroody.com, a site in the United Kingdom that acts as a matchmaker between free donors and women desiring to become pregnant. Big sperm clinics evolved in order to give women more control by making the process of getting a sperm donor less secretive and safer, and also to offer the highest-quality product. Today, that means genetically sound, disease-free sperm that has been quarantined for six months. That's just the minimum to meet FDA mandates. Donors also pass psychological health checks, background checks, and tout their Ivy League degrees or resemblance to A-list celebrities. Dr. Cappy Rothman, the medical director of the California Cryobank, told me that his customers will walk away knowing more about their donor than he does about his wife of 40 years. The problem is that with less secrecy and more established legal standards, sperm donation has also become an expensive and exclusive process. Vials of sperm cost up to $500 each, and an insemination through a private doctor's office can run more than $1,000 for each pregnancy attempt, depending upon one's insurance. Single women and lesbian couples now make up 50 percent of the business of sperm banks like the California Cryobank, which sells on average 30,000 vials of sperm a year. In the United Kingdom, clinics that are part of the national health care system will not inseminate a single woman in her 20s, nor will they offer any background information about a donor. Unlike in the United States, the concept of an "Open Identity" donor who would give the child the opportunity to meet his or her biological father at 18 does not exist in the United Kingdom. And for donors, says Rothman, "It's now harder to get accepted to our bank than it is to get into Harvard. We only accept nine out every 1,000 applications." This has led to the booming gray market. Since free sperm donors are the Wild West of sperm donation, there are no official statistics on how many there are. Based on an extensive web search, most of the donors are based in the United States and England, but some come from as far away as Bahrain. There has been no official legal crackdown on free sperm donors because technically it's not illegal, but the FDA does have mandated requirement that sperm donors must meet. "If it was a sperm bank not meeting the mandate, no one would be arrested and thrown in jail for a civil suit, but the bank would be shut down," says Dr. Rothman. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Painful ‘4-hour erection’ may soon be history
A research team from United States and China suggests adenosine deaminase enzyme therapy could successfully prevent or treat penile fibrosis in men with priapism. Penile fibrosis is a condition associated with the build up of scar tissue and eventual impotency. “Coping with priapism is hard enough, but knowing that it can ultimately lead to fibrosis within the penis adds insult to injury,” said Dr Gerald Weissmann, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, where the study is published. “Because of our study, we have revealed that increased adenosine signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of the progression of priapism to penile fibrosis,” said Yang Xia, a scientist involved in the study from the University of Texas-Houston Medical School’s Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. “This finding led to a novel therapeutic possibility to treat and prevent this dangerous complication seen in priapic humans by targeting on this signaling pathway in the near future,” Xi added. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Exploring With an Armada of Autonomous Robots
KeelyNet JPL has a fun article on their website detailing what future robotic exploration might entail: an armada of robots could one day fly above the mountain tops of Saturn's moon Titan, cross its vast dunes and sail in its liquid lakes. This is the vision of Wolfgang Fink, from the California Institute of Technology. He says we are on the brink of a great paradigm shift in planetary exploration, and the next round of robotic explorers will be nothing like what we see today. "The way we explore tomorrow will be unlike any cup of tea we've ever tasted," said Fink. "We are departing from traditional approaches of a single robotic spacecraft with no redundancy that is Earth-commanded to one that allows for having multiple, expendable low-cost robots that can command themselves or other robots at various locations at the same time." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Toyota to release solar charger for electric vehicles
Toyota is developing a solar charging station for electric cars and plug-in hybrids, making a green technology even greener. It has also designed a battery charger for mounting inside an electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid to recharge the storage batteries. Toyota's solar charging station will consist of solar cells capable of generating 100/200V of electricity. The station includes storage batteries to store the electricity generated until it is required to recharge electric vehicles. The station also has a communication facility to authenticate users' identification information, and to communicate the amount of charge and other data to a remote data center. The communication system is expected to use LANs and Mobile networks. Earlier this year Toyota Industries unveiled a new public charging station for electric vehicles, which went on sale a few months ago at a cost of 450,000 Yen (around 4,600USD). Both the earlier public charging station and the new solar charging system were developed in collaboration with Nitto Kogyo Corporation. - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Discovery - chemical that attracts mosquitoes to humans
KeelyNet The groundbreaking research, published this week in the early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, explains why mosquitoes shifted hosts from birds to humans and paves the way for key developments in mosquito and disease control. Entomology professor Walter Leal and postdoctoral researcher Zain Syed found that nonanal (sounds like NAWN-uh-nawl) is the powerful semiochemical that triggers the mosquitoes' keen sense of smell, directing them toward a blood meal. A semiochemical is a chemical substance or mixture that carries a message. "Nonanal is how they find us," Leal said. "The antennae of the Culex quinquefasciatus are highly developed to detect even extremely low concentrations of nonanal." Mosquitoes detect smells with the olfactory receptor neurons of their antennae. Leal and Syed found that nonanal acts synergistically with carbon dioxide, a known mosquito attractant. "We baited mosquito traps with a combination of nonanal and carbon dioxide and we were drawing in as many as 2,000 a night in Yolo County, near Davis," Syed said. "Nonanal, in combination with carbon dioxide, increased trap captures by more than 50 percent, compared to traps baited with carbon dioxide alone." - Full Article Source

10/29/09 - Finalists announced for Twitter star seance
The Tweance? Yes, the Halloween seance to be performed upon the heavenly medium that is Twitter. Famous and entirely reliable psychic Jayne Wallace is to tweet her way to and through heaven and hell this Friday, between the hours of 10 a.m. and midday British Thoroughly Awful Time (3 a.m. to 5 a.m. Pacific) An attempt to use the gestalt of Twitter to contact Michael Jackson, Kurt Cobain, River Phoenix and William Shakespeare. Yes, you can go to twitter.com/Tweance at the appointed time and listen to William Shakespeare himself. - Full Article Source

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10/28/09 - Imagine a world without America...
KeelyNet On the front blackboard was what looked like a piece of modern art; different colored streaks like jagged lightning descending from upper left to lower right. I walked in and discovered it was a chart detailing the decline of every major civilization, the Roman, the Greek, the Persian, the Carthaginian, the Ottoman; even the Mayan and Aztec. Decline! "Could this ever happen to America?" I thought about that for about eight seconds before deciding, "No!" The world loved us too much. And they had a lot of reason to love us even more than they did.

No. We're here for keeps. So, here comes professor Niall Ferguson with a convincing argument that America is waving a feeble goodbye while China is storming onto center stage. He may be right, particularly considering present management, but it may stall or even reverse America's decline if enough Americans put aside the Niagara of anti-Americanism – imported and domestic – and consider how far up America is declining from.

Who, from professor to peasant, is able to name another country that ever amassed more power and abused it less than America? Or, amassed more wealth and distributed it more fairly? What other country was ever attacked, then rallied and destroyed the aggressors and, instead of the traditional rape and plunder, rewarded its attackers with rehabilitation and democracy? And what country ever won a war and wound up with less territory than when the war began?

After spending much blood and treasure ejecting the Japanese from the Philippines, America gave the Philippines independence. The victorious Soviet forces subjugated Eastern Europe. Victorious American and British forces liberated Western Europe. All we asked from the nations we liberated was enough land to bury our dead.

Continents don't forget things like that quickly. Every German mother in that war prayed that her son would be captured by the Americans or the British, not the Soviets. That kind of compliment is not achieved by propaganda. Far from least and far from last, America had the nuclear bomb exclusively for four solid years. After the war it was never used, not even to brandish, blackmail or bluff.

Instead, America took the lead and founded the United Nations, fully allowing for America to be out-voted as that great "Parliament of Man" became a VIP lounge for dictators, aggressors, oppressors, thugs, thieves, sexual predators and other varieties of truly awful people.

Folk wisdom tells us, "Be nice to those you meet on your way up. You may meet them again on your way down." America was nice on our way up. A rip-roaring patriot published a list of almost a hundred countries that owed their existence, their freedom or their prosperity to America. I could only challenge the inclusion of two or three. "The world looks DOWN on America with the UTMOST ENVY." - Full Article Source

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~ ~ ~ 10/28/09 - Your attention for a moment please! ~ ~ ~
As you might know, KeelyNet went down last Friday from a crashed hard drive and worse on Dan's server in Dallas. Really bad so we decided it was best to move to another host which is hostgator.com. I am currently uploading all the files to restore KeelyNet so if you find some weirdness like missing pics or missing files, could you please
email me with the specific location, filename or url?
Once I get it all done, I'll update the news in a day or two I 'spect.
I would appreciate it mucho! Thanks! - Jerry

High Voltage & Free Energy Devices Handbook
KeelyNet This wonderfully informative ebook provides many simple experiments you can do, including hydrogen generation and electrostatic repulsion as well as the keys to EV Gray's Fuelless Engine. One of the most comprehensive compilations of information yet detailing the effects of high voltage repulsion as a driving force. Ed Gray's engine produced in excess of 300HP and he claimed to be able to 'split the positive' energy of electricity to produce a self-running motor/generator for use as an engine. Schematics and tons of photos of the original machines and more! Excellent gift for your technical friends or for that budding scientist! If you are an experimenter or know someone who investigates such matters, this would make an excellent addition to your library or as an unforgettable gift. The downloadable HVFE eBook pdf file is almost 11MB in size and contains many experiments, photos, diagrams and technical details. Buy a copy and learn all about hydrogen generation, its uses and how to produce electrostatic repulsion. - 121 pages - $15.00 - Source

DVD - the Physics of Crystals, Pyramids and Tetrahedrons
KeelyNet This is a wonderful 2 hour DVD which presents one man's lifelong study of pyramids, crystals and their effects. Several of his original and very creative experiments are explained and diagramed out for experimenters. These experiments include; 1) transmutation of zinc to lower elements using a tetrahedron, 2) energy extraction from a pyramid, 3) determining mathematic ratios of nature in a simple experiment, 4) accelerating the growth of food, 5) increasing the abundance of food, 6) how crystals amplify, focus and defocus energy, 7) using crystals to assist natural healing, 8) how the universe uses spirals and vortexes to produce free energy and MORE... - $20 DVD + S&H / Source to Buy and Youtube Clip

14 Ways to Save Money on Fuel Costs
KeelyNetThis eBook is the result of years of research into various methods to increase mileage, reduce pollution and most importantly, reduce overall fuel costs. It starts out with the simplest methods and offers progressively more detailed technologies that have been shown to reduce fuel costs. As a bonus to readers, I have salted the pages with free interesting BONUS items that correlate to the relevant page. Just filling up with one tank of gas using this or other methods explained here will pay for this eBook. Of course, many more methods are out there but I provided only the ones which I think are practical and can be studied by the average person who is looking for a way to immediately reduce their fuel costs. I am currently using two of the easier methods in my own vehicle which normally gets 18-22 mpg and now gets between 28 and 32 mpg depending on driving conditions. A tank of gas for my 1996 Ford Ranger costs about $45.00 here so I am saving around $15-$20 PER TANK, without hurting my engine and with 'greener' emissions due to a cleaner burn! The techniques provided in this ebook begin with simple things you can do NOW to improve your mileage and lower your gas costs. - $15 eBook Download / Source to Buy

KeelyNet BBS Files w/bonus PDF of 'Keely and his Discoveries'
KeelyNet Finally, I've gotten around to compiling all the files (almost 1,000 - about 20MB and lots of work doing it) from the original KeelyNet BBS into a form you can easily navigate and read using your browser, ideally Firefox but it does work with IE. Most of these files are extremely targeted, interesting and informative, I had forgotten just how much but now you can have the complete organized, categorized set, not just sprinklings from around the web. They will keep you reading for weeks if not longer and give you clues and insights into many subjects and new ideas for investigation and research. IN ADDITION, I am including as a bonus gift, the book (in PDF form) that started it all for me, 'Keely and his Discoveries - Aerial Navigation' which includes the analysis of Keely's discoveries by Dr. Daniel G. Brinton. This 407 page eBook alone is worth the price of the KeelyNet BBS CD but it will give you some degree of understanding about what all Keely accomplished which is just now being rediscovered, but of course, without recognizing Keely as the original discoverer. Chapters include; Vibratory Sympathetic and Polar Flows, Vibratory Physics, Latent Force in Interstitial Spaces and much more. To give some idea of how Keely's discoveries are being slowly rediscovered in modern times, check out this Keely History. These two excellent bodies of information will be sent to you on CD. If alternative science intrigues and fascinates you, this CD is what you've been looking for... - Source

New Vanguard Sciences eBooks - Save a Tree! eBooks make great gifts!
KeelyNet Shape Power - Dan Davidson's analysis of the mysterious pyramid energies, Keely's aether force, Reich's orgone energy, Schauberger's diamagnetic energy, plus a host of others, and shows how shape and materials interact with the universal aether to modify the aether into electromagnetic, gravitic, and various healing energies... - Shape Power Youtube

KeelyNet The Physics of the Primary State of Matter - published in the 1930s, Karl Schappeller described his Prime Mover, a 10-inch steel sphere with quarter-inch copper tubing coils. These were filled with a material not named specifically, but which is said to have hardened under the influence of direct current and a magnetic field [electro-rheological fluid]. With such polarization, it might be guessed to act like a dielectric capacitor and as a diode...

'The Evolution of Matter' and 'The Evolution of Forces' on CD
KeelyNet Years ago, I had been told by several people, that the US government frequently removes books they deem dangerous or 'sensitive' from libraries. Some are replaced with sections removed or rewritten so as to 'contain' information that should not be available to the public despite the authors intent. A key example was during the Manhattan Project when the US was trying to finalize research into atomic bombs. They removed any books that dealt with the subject and two of them were by Dr. Gustave Le Bon since they dealt with both energy and matter including radioactivity. I had been looking for these two books for many years and fortunately stumbled across two copies for which I paid about $40.00 each. I couldn't put down the books once I started reading them. Such a wealth of original discoveries, many not known or remembered today. / Page 88 - Without the ether there could be neither gravity, nor light, nor electricity, nor heat, nor anything, in a word, of which we have knowledge. The universe would be silent and dead, or would reveal itself in a form which we cannot even foresee. If one could construct a glass chamber from which the ether were to be entirely eliminated, heat and light could not pass through it. It would be absolutely dark, and probably gravitation would no longer act on the bodies within it. They would then have lost their weight. / Page 96-97 - A material vortex may be formed by any fluid, liquid or gaseous, turning round an axis, and by the fact of its rotation it describes spirals. The study of these vortices has been the object of important researches by different scholars, notably by Bjerkness and Weyher. They have shown that by them can be produced all the attractions and repulsions recognized in electricity, the deviations of the magnetic needle by currents, etc. These vortices are produced by the rapid rotation of a central rod furnished with pallets, or, more simply, of a sphere. Round this sphere gaseous currents are established, dissymetrical with regard to its equatorial plane, and the result is the attraction or repulsion of bodies brought near to it, according to the position given to them. It is even possible, as Weyher has proved, to compel these bodies to turn round the sphere as do the satellites of a planet without touching it. / Page 149 - "The problem of sending a pencil of parallel Hertzian waves to a distance possesses more than a theoretical interest. It is allowable to say that its solution would change the course of our civilization by rendering war impossible. The first physicist who realizes this discovery will be able to avail himself of the presence of an enemy's ironclads gathered together in a harbour to blow them up in a few minutes, from a distance of several kilometres, simply by directing on them a sheaf of electric radiations. On reaching the metal wires with which these vessels are nowadays honeycombed, this will excite an atmosphere of sparks which will at once explode the shells and torpedoes stored in their holds. With the same reflector, giving a pencil of parallel radiations, it would not be much more difficult to cause the explosion of the stores of powder and shells contained in a fortress, or in the artillery sparks of an army corps, and finally the metal cartridges of the soldiers. Science, which at first rendered wars so deadly, would then at length have rendered them impossible, and the relations between nations would have to be established on new bases." - Source

$5 Alt Science MP3s to listen while working/driving/jogging
KeelyNetNo time to sit back and watch videos? Here are 15 interesting presentations you can download for just $5 each and listen to while driving, working, jogging, etc. An easy way to learn some fascinating new things that you will find of use. Easy, cheap and simple, better than eBooks or Videos. Roughly 50MB per MP3. - Source

15 New Alternative Science DVDs & 15 MP3s
An assortment of alternative science videos that provide many insights and inside information from various experimenters. Also MP3s extracted from these DVDs that you can listen to while working or driving. Reference links for these lectures and workshops by Bill Beaty of Amateur Science on the Dark Side of Amateur Science, Peter Lindemann on the World of Free Energy, Norman Wootan on the History of the EV Gray motor, Dan Davidson on Shape Power and Gravity Wave Phenomena, Lee Crock on a Method for Stimulating Energy, Doug Konzen on the Konzen Pulse Motor, George Wiseman on the Water Torch and Jerry Decker on Aether, ZPE and Dielectric Nano Arrays. Your purchase of these products helps support KeelyNet, thanks! - Source to Buy

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What happened to our beloved
United States of America?


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From the Simpsons: "The potential for mischief varies inversely with one's proximity to the authority figure."
Ellen Glasgow "The only difference between
a rut and a grave...is the depth."
Grebennikov
(click here)

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Cree Indian Prophecy
Only after the Last Tree has been cut down,
Only after the Last River has been poisoned,
Only after the Last Fish has been caught,
Only then will you find that
Money Cannot Be Eaten.

Looking for 'PoP'
Proof of Principle
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Need an Energy Boost? - Try the MexiStim
the article tells you how to build or buy your own for $230 + S&H

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...Read about the MexiStim...

Chaos Converters
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Rhythmodynamics


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Who is Decker???


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University of Phoenix Atlanta

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Jerry Decker
Chuck Henderson


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